Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Can dogs get pregnant without a tie?

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by Mollieeeeee, Jan 13, 2022.


  1. Mollieeeeee

    Mollieeeeee PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2022
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    So my friend and I have been trying to breed my Pug female to my friends chihuahua male. There hasnt been a tie but it has gone inside a few times. Someone told me they could still get pregnant without a tie but others said they cant. If they cant well keep trying.

    The reason we would really like pups from them is because on a walk we saw the most adorable Chug. She looked exactly like a pug but tiny like a chihuahua. I fell in love with it and since my friend owns a male chihuahua and my Pug is 2 and a half we though wed have a litter.

    We are planning on keeping one each and the rest will go to family members. I know small dogs dont have big litters. Im hoping one of our chugs looks like the one I saw on the walk.

    So can the bitch get pregnant without a tie?
     
  2. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    Messages:
    15,605
    Likes Received:
    24,084
    The answer is yes, a slip mating can result in a pregnancy.

    However, it sounds as though both you and your Friend are very inexperienced and you really need to be more aware of the potential pitfalls.

    Had these two achieved a tie, then they would have needed careful managing, assuming the bitch is a maiden and the dog inexperienced.

    Have either of them had health tests relevant to their Breed, to ensure, as much as possible, that their pups are born healthy?
     
  3. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    28,409
    Likes Received:
    46,310
    Yes they can, but this is the worst possible way to breed.

    I would neuter the female asap.
     
    Calvine, simplysardonic and O2.0 like this.
  4. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2014
    Messages:
    6,657
    Likes Received:
    11,495
    So because you saw a mongrel you liked, you want to breed more mongrels
    Why not go to rescue and give any one of the small mongrels available,?

    What if none of them do?
    What then?
    Going to dump them onto a rescue to re-home because they look more chi than pug or look like neither?
    Genetics don't work on a 50/50 ratio
    Or
    what if the puppies have all the worst possible genetic problems both breeds carry?
    Pop eyes, breathing problems, luxating patellas, heart problems, just to name a few!
    Not forgetting you could actually lose mum and all pups as mum is likely to need a c section and pugs don't do well with anaesthesia
    All you're doing is chucking two random dogs together
    With no health TESTS ( not vet checks, actual tests you have to pay for) your looking at a litter of possible ticking time bombs

    Sorry
    but,
    With these reasons for breeding, you epitomise the very worst of bybs
     
    #4 mrs phas, Jan 13, 2022
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2022
  5. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    16,637
    Likes Received:
    29,496
    This is one of the problems. A cross breed pup can look like one or other of the parents, no guarantees that it will look like the puppy you saw and fell for.
    Also the pups can inherit health issues from either parent, both breeds have serious potential genetic conditions that pups can inherit.
    Pugs
    • Hip score testing, with the breed’s mean hip score being 24.9. This figure is significantly higher than that of the vast majority of other breeds, and indicates a general propensity to poor hip health.
    • DNA testing for a propensity to pug encephalitis, an inflammatory brain disease that leads to seizures, and is often fatal.
    • DNA testing for degenerative myelopathy, a condition of the spinal cord that can lead to paralysis.
    • Breed club testing for hemivertebrae in parent dogs, by means of x-ray examination. However, even parent dogs that do not possess the condition themselves may be carriers of it.
    Chihuahua https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/he...ng-started-with-health-testing-and-screening/
     
    #5 SusieRainbow, Jan 13, 2022
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2022
  6. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    14,880
    Likes Received:
    18,026
    This can't be a real post. Can it?
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  7. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    16,637
    Likes Received:
    29,496
    Indeed it can and probably is.
     
  8. Mollieeeeee

    Mollieeeeee PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2022
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would never dump a puppy! Why would you assume I would do that! Both our dogs are healthy they have been checked by a vet before breeding. Just because its not two pedigrees doesnt mean its a bad thing! Actually adding a chihuahua or other non flat faced dog to a pug will actually improve it by making the nose longer.....
     
  9. tyg'smum

    tyg'smum PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2018
    Messages:
    810
    Likes Received:
    2,186
    Oh dear. There's no guarantee that any puppy will be an "improvement": you're just as likely to to end up with one (or more) flat-faced chihuahua-types. And a health check by your vet doesn't mean that there won't be any genetic problems - only health tests (which can be eye-wateringly expensive) can indicate genetic issues which are likely to appear in later generations.
     
    Calvine, Lurcherlad, Sarah H and 3 others like this.
  10. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    Messages:
    15,605
    Likes Received:
    24,084

    I'm afraid that is not so.

    Any pups from such a mating will either take after the Pug or the Chi. Mating a flat faced dog to a longer nosed dog does not create a 'mix' of the two noses.

    When breeding for a specific characteristic, it has to be done over several generations. That is, you would keep a bitch pup from the litter, with the longer nose of the Chi and mate her to a dog with normal nose length. Again, you would keep a pup from that litter and mate her to a dog with normal nose length, and then, you would be on the right track, although the end result would likely be something that looks very much like a Chihuahua.

    Please be assured, if you persist with your plan, you most certainly not doing it for the betterment of either breed.

    If you go ahead with this, do be aware that, if you work, you are going to need to take a week off, the week your bitch is due, as she will need to be supervised, then you will need another two weeks off, to care for her and her puppies after delivery.

    When the pups are three weeks old, you will have to begin weaning, which involves five feeds a day, so you will need to be around to do that.

    You do need to stop and think carefully about whether you are really in a position to take proper care of your Pug and her litter.
     
  11. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2014
    Messages:
    6,657
    Likes Received:
    11,495
    To quote myself (bad form I know)

     
  12. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    19,350
    Likes Received:
    14,064
    That's nothing like enough. You should hip score (X-ray judged by a panel of specialists) and DNA screen for diseases the pups could inherit; a spinal x-ray would be desirable too as pugs have a lot of spinal issues linked to the kinked tail. Not to do that is irresponsible.
     
    mrs phas, Sarah H, Lurcherlad and 2 others like this.
  13. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    14,919
    Likes Received:
    10,506
    Most vets are surprisingly ignorant about breeding.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice