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Can dogs eat cheese and if so how much

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Mr Kipling, Mar 23, 2011.


  1. Mr Kipling

    Mr Kipling PetForums Member

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    Sook is preety good with food and will never take it but she does give me those sad eyes when I get a snack from the fridge. Never at main meal times, she lets us eat uninterrupted but if I get a snack and sit in front of the TV I get that, "where's mine" look.

    Lately I've been giving her a small slice of cheddar cheese when I get my sandwich at lunchtime, this is most days is it doing any harm and how much can she eat without issue.

    She's a GSD/Whippet cross, medium size and weight 25kg.

    Thanks.
     
  2. BenMac

    BenMac PetForums Senior

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    they love cheese!

    Lots of people use cheese cubes or squeezy cheese as a training treat, so a little bit now and then won't do any harm :)
     
  3. Helbo

    Helbo PetForums VIP

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    Cheese is full of fat - so I wouldn't give them too much, especially if you're feeding it every day lately.

    But they love it :D
     
  4. kimdelyse

    kimdelyse PetForums Senior

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    Flo has little cubes of cheese as a high value reward. Personally I'd be careful not to give it out for free too much or you'll loose your leverage! ;)
     
  5. shazalhasa

    shazalhasa PetForums VIP

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    I always do an extra few slices of cheese for the dogs when I'm having some. I break them up and get them to do things like sit, lie down and wait before letting them have the bits :)
     
  6. Mr Kipling

    Mr Kipling PetForums Member

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    Thanks folks,
    Sounds like a slice a day isn't doing any harm but I should make her work for it, she loves the stuff.

    I swear she has a full range of facial expressions including "i'm very cute give me some"
     
  7. sailor

    sailor PetForums VIP

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    Dito to whats already been said.

    I`m always cutting up cheese into small cubes for Sailor as rewards, he loves the stuff and will bend over backwards for even the smallest crumb of the stuff lol :D
     
  8. sailor

    sailor PetForums VIP

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    I don`t think a dog should have to work for every single treat... there are times when I have the children waiting for toast and Sailors sat with them, as if joining the que... the fact his sat patiently with the children, is work in itself ... he rarely sits still :rolleyes: so for nice calm things like that, Sailor just gets a slice of toast along with the kids...as if he was a 3rd child waiting

    It would be a good idea to get her to just go through her basics before you give her a slice of cheese... sit, down, paw etc I do these with Sailor atleast once a day, whether for food rewards or just a fuss.... sometimes I dont have to ask, he sees me near the fridge and he will go through them all himself because he knows whats coming lol :D
     
  9. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    Cheese will not hurt a dog as long as it is only small pieces and not too much. Perhaps you could get some low fat cheese if you are worried, then he can have some of that. My retriever would only take his tablets if embedded in a piece of cheese, Joshua will do almost anything for cheese, but Ferdie will spit it out. He is the only dog I have ever met who does not like cheese.
     
  10. Zaros

    Zaros Pet Forums, P/resident Evil

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    As everyone else has already stated cheese is fine just so long as it is given in moderation.
    Zara loves cheese and prefers mature/extra mature good old English Cheddar. She point blank refuses to eat the plastic cheese they seem produce in Finland whereas Oscar, on the other hand, has decided cheese is deadly poisonous just like he does with his dry food and won't eat anything other than fresh meat, 'Frolic' and adult 'Friskies'.
    :rolleyes::
     
  11. jetsmum

    jetsmum PetForums VIP

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    Jets super reward, the highest value there is for him, is a kong with cheese and peanut butter separated by a few little biscuits. It's not something he has every day, or even every week, it's saved for when he's been really good.
     
  12. Dazadal

    Dazadal PetForums Member

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    My dogs love cheese just small cubes and not too often. The more mature (and smelly) the more they like it. I only use cheese for training and ring bait with the Dalmatians as it is very low in Purine (that can cause bladder stones in Dallies).:D
     
    #12 Dazadal, Mar 23, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2011
  13. Nicky10

    Nicky10 PetForums VIP

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    Buster's favourite ever treat he'll do anything for cheese. The squeezy primula cheese especially. As long as they're not lactose intolerant it's fine to give small amounts as training treats.
     
  14. Milliepoochie

    Milliepoochie PetForums VIP

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    Millie loves a little bit of cheese as a treat :) But she normally has to rollover or speak for it. Mean Mummy! :D
     
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