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Can bucks and does (unspayed/unneutered) live together?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Amy Byer, Apr 21, 2020.


  1. Amy Byer

    Amy Byer PetForums Newbie

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    Hello!
    I have a question... Can bucks and does live together even if not fixed? Of course the consequence will be a litter but will they live happily? I have two unfixed buns that I want to breed but would like to keep them together permanently.

    I know breeders keep them separated then when they want them to mate they put them together, then separate again.

    I just wonder how stressful it would be for each other with constant hormones, or would it be a more natural process?
     
  2. Merixie

    Merixie PetForums Junior

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    It will all depend on the bunnies sex drive but nearly always they will be stressed. The buck will be triggered by the doe and the other way around.

    They will mate and the doe will get kits and mate again, they will breed like bunnies. So you would often end up with a lot of bunnies in just two months times.

    So it’s better keeping them separated until the bunnies have been neutered and spayed.

    If you are breeding, you will have it easier to control the situation, when they are separate and make sure the kits and mom will have it safe.
     
  3. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    There will be fighting, breeding, killing of kits to breed some more. Life of an intact community is not all sunshine and rainbows. Wildies can get away with it because they can literally run for the hills when fights kick off. Watership Down had some truth to it.
     
  4. Amy Byer

    Amy Byer PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your reply! They're quite active in the morning then they will lay around together during the day, and again more active at night. They both want to hump each other and she will lay down for him so I don't know if that's a good sign or not? They circle each other and honk so they seem happy.. I just don't know if they are actually happy or not, and if I separate them will that stress each other out more?
    Also he has been neutered but 14 days ago so I'm hoping he will calm down soon and not actually be fertile!
     

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  5. Amy Byer

    Amy Byer PetForums Newbie

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    Oh that sounds horrible... They're free roam in my flat and I was thinking when or if she does have a litter then I can keep them in separate rooms until I eventually get her spayed. He has been neutered but 14 days ago so I was hoping this would just last for a few weeks until he settles down
     
  6. Corneal

    Corneal Cornealia

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    Nope, they WILL breed and they WILL kill each other
     
  7. Amy Byer

    Amy Byer PetForums Newbie

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    Basically my buck was neutered 14 days ago but I didn't realise he could be fertile still and they've already been together for a few days. They hump each other and have definitely done the deed by now.. I'm accepting she will most likely be pregnant and I will do my best to research how to look after her and the litter if there is one. I just wonder now they're bonded and snuggle each other alot and no fights, is it worth separating? I suspect his hormones will calm down soon
     
  8. Merixie

    Merixie PetForums Junior

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    Separate them his hormones will first calm down 8 weeks post-neuter during this period with a pregnant doe and kits that might come. The stress around your doe can make her kill her kits or the buck can kill them.

    Bunnies have no problem killing their kits if they are stressed or feel like it will not be a good time. Specially for a first time mom, the litter might not survive. But you as an owner should be able to take it in considerate and try to make the optimal and calm space for your doe.

    She won’t feel lonely and you can put them together first after the kits have moved away or if you keep a kit and make a larger bunny gang.

    We still need to bare in mind bunnies are still animals and they won’t have the same attachment to the kits. They are prey animals and will react differently. One of my bunnies as a kit was nearly killed by his mother because he was the runt of the litter.

    So you need to take out the factors that can make it dangerous for your doe. Also think about your buck pumped with hormones and always want to mate, while your doe doesn’t want they will cause stress to each other.
     
    Amy Byer likes this.
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