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Can anyone offer any insight ?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Pinky1, Apr 14, 2011.


  1. Pinky1

    Pinky1 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all,
    I've been enjoying reading your discussions for advice but just joined today to see if anyone may be able to advise! I'll try to be succinct!
    We have 2 rescue dogs, a female mastiff who we have had for 1 year who is a good girl, and we recently adopted a 9 month old (teen!!) crossbreed.
    He is a typical teen puppy and we have been working hard on his training and giving plenty of exercise with road walks to work on his lead manners as well as running on the beach most days to let off excess energy.
    He and our female dog play a LOT , which is very boisterous to the point of seeming too rough sometimes but no harm done apart from the house looking like a whirlwinds been through!
    We studied the notes on here about preventing separation anxiety, by de sensitisation and he's been mainly ok... until a couple of days ago when he's forgotten everything And has destroyed cushions, chewed the leather sofa, pooed and weed( even after a one hour walk and I only left him for 1.5 hours) pulled books off shelf and chewed them, ate dog basket cushion etc etc you get the picture!
    my husband often works from home and I am wondering if the problem is
    spending TOO much time with him, as when we have to leave him it's a
    horrible shock. Today I popped home from work mid morning as was ( rightly
    ) worried , and I've ended up taking the afternoon off to sort things out/ clean
    up!


    I've started going back to basics by popping out for 2 mins, 5mins etc which I do with no fuss . I don't want to crate him- I think he'd go berserk plus on days when we are both out at work he'd be in there for 4 hours which seems wrong. I leave him with a frozen stuffed kong or treat ball, tv on .

    Am I missing something ? Am scared for my lovely house that he's going to wreck it ... Have developed my own reverse separation anxiety where's I am scared to open my front door when I come home to see what he has done!
     
  2. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    Might be worth seeing if you can film it to. If it's seperation then he ought to act anxious early. If he just got bored, then he'd settle down and then kick off later for the sheer fun of it.

    Unfortunately if he's been trained by the "No! Don't do this" method, rather than giving him good alternative well behaved activities as a puppy, he may be inhibited until noone's around and then just be having destructive fun. And it might even turn out not to be him, like you expect.
     
  3. haeveymolly

    haeveymolly PetForums VIP

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    Try a wind chime while you are in the house, choose the right time to begin with, either after play or a walk when hopefull he is a little calmer, put it near an open window when it begins to chime/tinkle say bed time and when he goes into bed or you might have to put him there and work on this depending if your dog understands that command and totaly ignore him, no eye contact or speaking, do this for as long as it takes if he gets up straight away stop the windchime and repeat it over again. When you leave him to actually go out set the windchime off say bed and walk out with no fuss.

    This has been very successful as the dog should eventually associate the wind chime with no contact with its owner, when returning, ignore the dog until the windchime has been stopped and then acknowlege your dog.
     
  4. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    I would think some of this is because at 9 - 12 months ish is when the adult teeth settle into the jaw and is consequently the worse chewing stage.

    Also about 9 months is the terrible teenage stage (think Harry Enfield's 'Kevin').

    I would personally cage him. I have always left mine caged for four hours when I worked part-time. Far safer than having your house destroyed or him chewing through an electric cable.
     
  5. lucysnewmum

    lucysnewmum PetForums Senior

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    contrary to popular belief crates are an absolute Godsend when rehabilitating nervous, anxious dogs. they create a place of safety, a den if you like, where the dog knows it can relax until someone comes to feed or play with it.
    all of my foster dogs are crated for this reason and it works wonders on their self esteem and confidence.
     
  6. Pinky1

    Pinky1 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for the advice everyone! I've also made inquired for a trainer/behaviourist recommended by my local RSPCA so will be doing our best to get over this issue
     
  7. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    Phew! I'm glad Twiggy ain't my Mum! :001_smile:
     
  8. Pinky1

    Pinky1 PetForums Newbie

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    I've "pretended" to go out 12 times today, leaving him for 1 min to about 8/10 mins and the last time he didn't get out of his basket to pace and whine at the door and didn't even bother getting up to greet me when I came back!
    He probably realises I'm just stood in the front garden and thinks I've lost the plot!! ( as do my neighbours I expect)
     
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