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Buying a labradoodle (mum has no hip scores)

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Dudu15, Dec 12, 2018.


  1. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

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    Why not just get a purebred Labrador or a Poodle if you would prefer non shedding? it won't be hard to get a well bred Lab as they are a dime a dozen. A Poodle you'd likely have to wait longer for. There are so few ethical breeders of crossbreeds that it isn't even something I would consider.
     
  2. Sairy

    Sairy PetForums VIP

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    Given your situation (first time dog owner with young children) I would personally not touch a labradoodle with a barge pole. I have seen a number of them come through training classes and they are generally very high energy and, well, a handful. A trainer I know who has a labradoodle and has known quite a few over the years says "labradoodles were created purely to test your patience". In the right hands and with the work put in they can be great dogs, but they are not for people who don't have a huge amount of time to keep them occupied.

    I would encourage you to re-think your choice of dog (there are other low-shedding breeds that would suit you better). I would also suggest waiting until your youngest children are a bit older. Puppies and young children are not easy to manage at the same time. Your puppy will most likely be very bitey as a youngster and your children will need to be able to understand the concept of sitting still and being calm around the pup.
     
  3. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    I hate being negative especially when someone wants a dog as I know they bring great joy and happiness to family life but I have a less popular breed of low shedding cross ended up with her aged 10 months when the family found her high energy too much for them with 3 children aged between 5 and 10. Also, the commitment to the coat is huge they do need a daily comb or brush my girl makes more mess than my long haired lassie dog did as mud clings in the coat.

    Anyway, with a 2 and 3-year old you have a big commitment not that a puppy isn't doable with young children and you do have a 13-year-old to help. You have thought a lot as you have obviously read up

    However, winter with toddlers and a puppy is hard. If you get this pup you will be outdoors at 3 am in the worst weather for toilet training. No sleep, cold and daily toddlers is tough. I would think about waiting a couple of months as this pup is ringing alarm bells. I would also think about an older rescue and if that might be a better fit.

    February is also a great month for rescue pups of all types.

    If you decide on buying a puppy along with the relevant health tests you could look for a breeder who socialises the pups with a family environment as children can be scary.

    In the meantime get some visiting young dogs to your home for the children to interact with. Try dog sitting for a few days if you know anyone.

    Other breeds to look at besides the poodle are the Bichon, the Schnauzer, Yorkshire terrier, Tibetan terrier, Havanese, Maltese terrier, greyhound, whippet. I believe you have been given a great link to breeds that fit your requirements.


    Good luck I hope you will have a lovely dog one day.
     
  4. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    Oh, I forgot one other bit of advice. Whatever type of dog you decide on see if there is a breed Facebook group, you can often get a good idea of breeders and breed traits by lurking for a while.

    Not everyone is honest about issues their favourite breed has or it's just that once you have the breed their intelligence or cuteness makes you forget the small negative.
     
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  5. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Happy to give a very honest appraisal of the Tibetan Terrier :Hilarious
     
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  6. Chatcat

    Chatcat Guest

    How true! I just adore Collies and I don't think i would want a different breed, despite their, err....intelligence!
     
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  7. Lauren5159

    Lauren5159 Lover of Terriers, loser of the plot.

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    Sorry, late to the party.

    I think everyone has given you very good advice OP.
    Labradoodle or any ‘doodle’ type are a minefield. And I don’t mean that to be derogatory as there are a couple of good breeders out there, they’re just vastly outnumbered by those who are less than stellar.

    When it comes to health tests, enough importance cannot be laid. Especially when it comes to Labradors. Poodles should also be hip scored so ideally, you’d want hip scoring on both sides and better than that? Generations of hip scoring. But those scores are minimal. There’s so many other genetic tests that both Labs and Poodles should undergo before being bred. No health tests at all? I’d walk away. I know it’s tough but you really should want to stack the odds in the favour of your pup.

    As for the ‘low shedding’ claim.
    I hate it. I truly do.
    Here’s why:
    Poodles are hypoallergenic. Poodles.
    Labradors shed HEAVILY.
    You mix the two and you ARE NOT guaranteed that all the puppies will inherit the poodle coat type gene. It’s a possibility that not a single puppy will inherit the poodle coat. Or maybe they all will... There’s absolutely no way to know.
    The only way to find out is to individually test the coat of every puppy and guess what? That can’t be done until they’re a bit older. Usually the puppies are in their new homes by that point.
    So you’ve bought your ‘hypoallergenic Labradoodle’ because there’s Poodle in it. Only, you realise later that the dog sheds. Your puppy has inherited the Labrador coat. Now what?
    Chances are you love the puppy and you realise the hypoallergenic claim doesn’t matter because your puppy isn’t going anywhere and you’ll keep it regardless. So what was the original point of wanting a hypoallergenic dog?

    Worse that that! You end up with a dog with a mashed up Lab/Poodle coat. I met one once. It was awful. I touched this dog and it set my teeth on edge. The only way I can describe it is, imagine stroking Hagrid’s beard. That was this dog’s coat. I shiver whenever I think about it.

    There’s also the massive variation in size of Labradoodles.
    There’s three sizes of poodle so what size was used to make your pup? Standard poodles are massive! People often forget or don’t realise how big they are. So imagine your two toddlers with a dog the size of a standard poodle but the bouncy attitude and personality of an adolescent Labrador :Wideyed
    Because that’s the reality of what you may end up with.

    They’re both gundog breeds and gundog puppies are mouthy! I cannot explain to you how bitey and mouthy this puppy will be. Then consider the size and brute strength of this puppy when it’s jumping all over the house and all over your kids, because it will. That’s what puppies do -they jump around, they nip hands and legs and feet and fingers, they grab clothes and bark and knock kids over running from room to room with shoes in their mouths... And then one of the kids slips and falls in a pee your puppy has left as a surprise. Kids are crying, dog is barking and running riot... The realities of large boisterous puppies are no fun.

    Yes, chances are it will grow in to a fabulous addition to your family and a couple of years in you’ll wonder how you ever got by without a dog... But getting to that point is the real tough part and all I ask you do, is seriously consider what breed and what type of dog and personality will truly fit in and allow you and the pup to live happily together.

    All puppies are hard work but stack the odds in your favour and really research the best breed for you.
     
  8. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Lauren5159 and tabelmabel like this.
  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Then get a Poodle, which is guaranteed to be non-shedding (Labradoodles aren't). Of course, it's also possible to be allergic to dog saliva or dander, which all dogs have; there are no truly hypoallergenic dogs'. It will be much easier to find a decent, ethical breeder of Poodles., and they are every bit as cute.
     
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  10. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    When winnie's a world famous gundog and you write your memoirs, mind get this quote in somewhere! Absolutely brilliant!
     
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  11. kirksandallchins

    kirksandallchins PetForums VIP

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    All three of my Labradoodles came from parents who were hip and eye tested. The majority of breeders in most popular dog breeds don't carry out health tests. In things like Pugs, Bulldogs and Frenchies you will find that most non showing people only test for colour.

    With all dogs, training plays a big part in their attitude. My dogs are playful and energetic but have never been allowed to get hyper or manic. My 11 year old still loves her walks and still chases after a ball. The only health issue she has has was removing a fatty lump from her leg.
     
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