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Buying a labradoodle (mum has no hip scores)

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Dudu15, Dec 12, 2018.


  1. Dudu15

    Dudu15 PetForums Newbie

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    Hello, I'm looking for advice. We are about to buy a labradoodle. There is a litter that we like a lot but the trouble is that mum who is a Labrador and the family pet had not had her hips screened or eyes tested.

    The owners later sent a text to say they can't get hold of her breeders for more information and that they will be happy for a refund if we decide to take one pup home and aren't happy with anything.

    Should we go ahead and buy one?
     
  2. Chatcat

    Chatcat Guest

    The fact that you are asking......should tell you the answer! It is not good enough to say 'can't get hold of her breeder'. There is no-one on the planet you 'can't get hold of'. She says she will be happy for a refund now, but later, hmmm, maybe you won't be able to get hold of her!! :eek:

    I'd rather have a rescue, with all their baggage, than what you are suggesting. :D
     
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  3. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I do not think a refund is any use as the dog will be grown up before any problems show. At the same time I very much doubt if many, if any, labradoodle pups come from hip scored parents. The standard poodle side should be hip scored too so not just down to the bitch. It is completely up to you but if you want a labradoodle then you cannot be fussy over health testing. If hip and eye certificates are important to you then go for either a lab or a poodle which are both lovely dogs in their own right and you will know what you are getting. As hip scoring and eye testing has been done now for many many decades and hip dysplasia seems to be more common than ever I personally would steer clear of breeds that are too prone to it but also would not worry too much about scoring. Not a popular opinion on here but a normal one among most dog owners which is why the majority of litters you will see advertised have not had any health tests.
     
  4. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    Run a mile. This is not a good breeder. As others have said, both parents of this dog needed hip scoring, not just the lab side, plus the other health tests. If you take this pup you're likely to never be able to get hold of this breeder again and be faced with thousands and thousands in vets bills and potentially a dog that has to be put to sleep at a tragically young age. It's not worth the potential heartache.

    What is it in a Labradoodle that made you want that crossbreed?
     
  5. Dudu15

    Dudu15 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for the reply. Well we have no preference really, but the idea of a hypoallergenic low shedding dog is great. Good with kids. After looking and pups and researchijg it becoming more evident to us that the cuteness is also a major factor.
     
  6. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    The hypoallergenic thing doesn't always work out with crossbreeds - they can inherit from either side of the gene pool. I've seen Labradoodles with all sorts of coats! There are quite a few Labradoodles going through rescues who are NOT good with kids either. That all depends on how they are raised and how good the kids are with dogs as well ;) For example there's three at Dogs Trust right now, would be worth reading their write ups to get an understanding on the quirks of this crossbreed!
    https://www.dogstrust.org.uk/rehoming/dogs/filters/~386~~~~n~

    If hypoallergenic and low-shedding is a key factor, why not a regular Poodle? They don't have to have a daft hair cut but ALL low-shedding breeds need regular trips to the groomers so that has to be factored into their care budget.

    The Kennel Club have a good list of pure dog breeds who are low or no shedding. They will also have a list of more reputable breeders and breed rescues.
    https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/ge...ing-the-right-dog/non-shedding-breeds-of-dog/
     
  7. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Presumably the poodle side is what appeals to you. You only have a 50 percent chance of a poodle coat and non shedding so if that is the thing that matters to you and you like the poodle look then why not go for a poodle. Their temperaments are second to none. They are far less hyper than most labradoodles and you have more idea of what size your pup will grow to. You should be able to find a good breeder that health tests and knows the history of their dogs. They make fantastic family dogs, are great with children, very trainable and a lot less coat care than many labradoodles which tend to matt very easily and need clipping as often as a poodle. You can also choose whether you want a standard or a miniature or even a toy. I had standards and they were fantastic dogs and I now have miniatures who are also fantastic. They are very sporty dogs if you go to the right breeder. Mine walk miles with the horses and are great ratters.
     
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  8. Dudu15

    Dudu15 PetForums Newbie

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    It's just getting a bit too confusing and wanting to get it right as first time dog buyers. We have thought about it for many years and we have put it off for solo long but we feel now is the right time.

    It is a busy household, four children, both of us work (though I'm part time), so a dog that will adjust easily, who would grow into the family. We are looking for a dog who the kids can get involved in caring for but still won't take the dog out independently, minimal shedding, and looks cute. Size doesn't matter. But being realistic with our busy lifestyle should not need more than 1 hour of walks. We have a large garden.

    So we are researching and looking around as to find the most suitable dog for our lifestyle as it won't be fair on the dog otherwise.

    As suggested above I will look into a poodle and see if that's suited.
     
  9. Gemmaa

    Gemmaa PetForums VIP

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    I'm a little biased because the Scabradoodles I know are a pair of complete jerks (and both have cost an awful lot in vet bills already), but I wouldn't have one if you paid me, and especially not from a breeder who conveniently can't be contacted.
    Would definitely look into a nice pure bred Poodle over the cross, I honestly don't know how they got so popular.
     
  10. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    How old are the children? I wonder if a rescue dog would work for you rather than going the puppy route which can be a huge leap into dog ownership (just look at all the puppy woe trouble threads on this forum!!). A rescue dog may already have at least basic house training, a bit older may be a little less high energy than a lunatic puppy.

    A greyhound might suit you guys well.
     
    #10 bunnygeek, Dec 12, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
    Picklelily likes this.
  11. Dudu15

    Dudu15 PetForums Newbie

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    Well 2 of the kids are below 3... The other two are 13 and 9.
     
  12. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums Senior

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    Hmm with two under 3's and a puppy you may find yourself in a whirlwind of nipped children and destroyed toys. Are you really prepared for this?!! A lot of dogs end up in rescue due to small children and the dogs not working well together. Is waiting until the youngest is 4-5 a possibility? When they're that little bit older they're more likely to understand not to get in the dog's bed or try and snatch toys out the mouth. I know my 3 year old nephew would be a nightmare with a dog, he's very grabby!
     
  13. PawsOnMe

    PawsOnMe PetForums VIP

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    My grandma's poodle cross sheds loads so don't think they're hypoallergenic just because there is poodle in there. Labs are heavy shedders.

    If you're drawn to the look of a labradoodle the chances are you're drawn to the curly coat and puppy or teddy bear cut. Those are the poodle side.
    a0d22c7e61b937dd62773dc9cf214f02--einstein-poodle-cuts.jpg
    images.jpg
    Both poodles
    images-1.jpg LabradoodlePoodleLabradorRetrieverMixBennett3HalfYearsOldPoodleLook3.jpeg
    And labradoodles
    Have a look at poodles, you get a choice in sizes, they're gentle and not as clumsy as labs so not as likely to send your little ones flying, they're very trainable and they're such great characters. :)
     
  14. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    Just on the subject of hip scores - buying a pup from 2 parents with low scores is no guarantee your pup will have good hips. It just tips the odds in your favour a bit. I have a dog with hip dysplasia whose parents both had low hip scores - i think to really reduce the risk, you need to look back 5 generations. ( read that somewhere and has stuck in my head but cannot remember where)

    There are dogs with awful hips on x ray that manage well and appear fit and active and vice versa - you can further stack the odds in their favour by gentle exercise, right diet etc - as the exact factors causing symptomatic hip dysplasia aren't fully understood, there is lots of research out there worth taking a look at.


    I make no comment as to the quality of the pup you are considering!
     
  15. Dogloverlou

    Dogloverlou PetForums VIP

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    Regardless of the breed/mix, I would not buy from a breeder who does not do the necessary health testing. There is no excuse for it, it's just pure laziness & greed.

    Go elsewhere.
     
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  16. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Offering a refund for a puppy in the event that things go wrong is a useless proposition. By that time you will love your puppy to bits and will do/spend anything to keep it; unhealthy pups can be tragedy on four legs, for everybody.
    Also, I thought you could verify health testing via the Kennel Club, if you know the dog/bitch name and they were KC registered. If they werent, then this pup's parent can't be, so obviously no relevant checks.
    It's a big gamble to take, and personally I would opt for a properly bred Poodle; brilliant, clever little dogs.
     
  17. tabulahrasa

    tabulahrasa PetForums VIP

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    What information would they want from the breeder?... it was down to them to health check their bitch before breeding her and they didn’t bother to, or weren’t willing to spend the money.

    You could take a gamble, the puppy might be fine... or it might not be.

    It’s a gamble I took tbh, the parents weren’t health tested, but the grandparents were, they were from great lines.

    I got an amazing dog, but he was also a dog with elbow dysplasia and other health issues, years worth of operations and pain management, reduced exercise and worry - and I had to have him PTS on Monday because his body finally gave up on him at 6 years old, when he should have been only halfway through his life.

    I don’t regret taking him as such, but I do regret my naivety at the time and I really resent that I gave my hard earned money to someone who let him be born into the life he had and couldn’t even be bothered to do a couple of tests that might have prevented it.
     
  18. DaisyBluebell

    DaisyBluebell Earth, the insane asylum of the Universe

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    If in doubt (which you are) don't.
     
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  19. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    Sorry, but if I was you I'd walk way, wait until the New Year and look for a breeder that does health tests.
     
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  20. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
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    I would avoid the breeder, they don't sound very ethical.

    You will very unlikely get a 'hypoallergenic' or non shedding dog from mixing poodles with other breeds.

    As an example of how unpredictable genetics can be, I met what I thought was a liver flat coated retriever the other day, turned out he was a labradoodle.
     
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