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Buster and stroke symptoms

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by grumpy goby, May 22, 2020 at 6:22 AM.


  1. grumpy goby

    grumpy goby Grumpy wench.

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    So it’s been a traumatic day for poor old buster...(and me!)

    He was fine this morning, pretty chipper in fact. Then he at his lunch fine, as usual. I am working from home at the mo so I put him back to bed (he sleeps in a kennel, but indoors...he just likes being enclosed). An hour or two later I went to walk him and he couldn’t stand, back legs had given way and his eyes were moving side to side. When he did try to walk, he would turn in circles.
    He had been sick, but not lost control of his bladder...

    we rubbed his legs, and tried to settle him down, and eventually he did calm down and we got him to the vet.... where he was VERY sick again.... like everywhere.

    still he struggled to walk, or stand in a stable manner, although this didn’t stop him scavenging scraps of treat off the vet floor...
    Bloods, urine, heart and temp all ok.
    They don’t know if it’s a stroke, mini stroke or vestibular syndrome (which can also be stroke caused)...

    I am bringing him home Later tonight and sleeping downstairs with him... but any tips on how to help him if he feels dizzy, or tips on settling nausea? Or anyone with any Experience with a dog recovering from a stroke or stroke like symptoms?
     
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  2. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    No experience or advice, but sending positive vibes for a good recovery for him.

    Must have been very scary for you :(
     
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Maybe something with ginger would help with the nausea? Poor him and poor you :(
     
  4. niamh123

    niamh123 PetForums VIP

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    Sending healing vibes for Buster
     
  5. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Oh no, poor Buster and poor you! That must have been very traumatic for you both.

    My elderly cat had a massive stroke at the end of last year out of the blue. She couldn’t eat or drink by herself and couldn’t sit or stand. Unfortunately she didn’t recover.

    Buster sounds in a much better state than Tala was so fingers crossed he makes a good recovery :) I’m sure with a comfy place to lie and your company he’ll be fine overnight. I’m not sure what the temperature is like up your way but he might need a fleece on if he can’t quite regulate his body temperature?
     
  6. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    It sounds classic Vestibular - the sickness is balance nausea (as anyone who has had labyrinthitis will know :Hungover).

    My experience of this - if it is vestibular - is that it does settle and the nausea lessens - the balance will improve (although the dogs can remain wobbly - one of my old dogs walked in a curve for months following a vestibular attack). The reason is often unknown which is why it is called idiopathic vestibular syndrome but it is common in older dogs.

    In my experience leaving them to rest and deal with the 'sickness' themselves is best - generally they will self control (lay down if they feel wobbly and sick) until it passes. Don't try to get them up. If they are having trouble walking straight or the legs won't hold then you will have to help them out to the garden for their wee.

    I'm sure your Vet will keep an eye on Buster.

    J
     
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  7. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    When my dog had a vestibular episode, the vet offered anti-nausea medication; did your vet not?
    Travel sickness tablets for kids could help, but do check with the vet over the phone and don't tell the chemist they're for a dog. They won't be licensed for use in animals so the pharmacist would refuse to sell them.
     
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  8. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    And something to help support his weight and guide him when he tries to walk; an old towel cut up, or you can buy purpose built on line.

    My Mum’s elderly dog had Vestibular (if that’s what this is), and improvement was very very slow but he did recover, though left with a permanent head-tilt.
     
  9. grumpy goby

    grumpy goby Grumpy wench.

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    thanks all for the support!

    @Burrowzig no, they didn’t give any nausea meds to go home with although I have to go back tomorrow.

    he had an IV whilst at the vet, bloods were fine if Showing he is a bit dehydrated. The cortisone seems to have helped and he seems normal this evening, although I did ask they check his ears tomorrow as I read infection can lead to vestibular episodes, she hadn’t checked and said one was dirty so she will prescribe something for that tomorrow.

    He is sleepy and subdued but seems fine this evening! Hopefully the anti inflammatories are enough to get him through whatever it is!

    @McKenzie We did go and stock up on blankets to keep him snuggled up and settled, I used to have an equafleece for U.K. winters/snow but honestly, he hates wearing clothes, and at 15 I can’t convince him otherwise
     
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  10. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    Poor little mite. Must have been very scary for you all.
    Hoping it's just a passing thing and he's got a few more years ahead yet
     
  11. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I know he's a ickle older gentleman, and I would expect it to show earlier to be honest but your description also sounds like Spikes Disease. With the vomiting, quickish recovery, and still alert. Probably not at all, but usually triggered by excitement in my opinion.

    What a worry, but hope you have over come the shock, and Buster is OK now.
     
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  12. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I agree the walking in circles and eyes moving and nausea all sounds like classic vestibular disease. In our case too, the vet prescribed anti-nausea meds which did help greatly, I would definitely ask your vet about that. Another benefit of the nausea meds is that some have a mild sedative effect and help the dog relax and sleep, as the whole experience is understandably very upsetting for them.
     
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  13. polishrose

    polishrose PetForums VIP

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    have no experience of this so have no words of advice but I hope he's OK.
     
  14. natsrkuhl

    natsrkuhl PetForums Newbie

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    Has he been checked for an ear infection? My chow had a funny turn, head was bouncing, left eyes where bouncing, loss of balance. It was horrible. I thought she'd a stroke but it was an ear infection. Was a good week or so if treatments for her to recover.
     
  15. grumpy goby

    grumpy goby Grumpy wench.

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    I asked specifically when collecting him and she did check his ears, one was very dirty and she couldn’t see the ear drum so she is going to give us stuff today to clear it and clear any infection :)

    @lullabydream we did suspect spikes Disease when he was younger now you mention it (must have been 7 or so years ago) he had seizures for a while which baffled the vet but seemed to clear up with diet change (grains set it off).... there is probably a thread on here about it somewhere!!
     
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  16. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    He's definitely the breed type I would say Buster is..

    My only experience is my own JRT cross, who looked nothing like a JRT. It just so happened that my vet had been reading many articles at the time and no doubt numerous studies of Spikes Disease that I came in with my dog vomiting, shaking but wasn't in my eyes a seizure. Had lived breathed epilepsy with my old dog. So I had seen 'grande mal' petite mal' as they were called then and absences. Still frightening. At the time it was all, border terrier this, that thought. So I was either lucky, unlucky we were guessing it was Spikes. Guessing border terrier was in my Jasper's ancestry and unlucky as still no idea how to treat it really. More ideas, and better now but did note excitement was a trigger and all my dogs think walks, training and meal times are exciting. Really any interacting with us/me are and this was when it was its worse. I don't know why he grew out of it so to speak in later years but he did. It just like magically disappeared. But after about age 10 it went and we lost him at 13, nearly 14 to an agressive form of cancer.
     
  17. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I had one that had short episodes, often all I noticed was a head tilt and maybe a bit of eye movement. I did not go to the vet, she was never sick but eventually she had a much more serious 'doggy stroke' and was put to sleep, probably a year or so after the first episode and a respectable old age. I understand that they should recover well within 3 days if they are going to make a full recovery. My girl kept her head tilt, it got worse but never went away.
     
  18. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    I had a Groenendael bitch who had two strokes. One at ten years old, from which she recovered quickly, a much more serious one at fourteen years old. She took a week to begin to recover from that. The rapid 'side to side' eye movement is symptomatic.

    She lived until just short of her seventeenth Birthday and never had another.

    She was treated with Vivitonin.
     
  19. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    What they suggested with Zigs was an injection.
     
  20. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    How is Buster?
     
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