Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Breeding

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Bunnie, Jan 4, 2012.


  1. Bunnie

    Bunnie PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi I am new to this site and new to breeding just looking for advise and tips of experts. I hav already bin reading loads on Internet but I wanna chat with people with hands on experience so that I can be sure that when the time comes I will have all the best knowledge to breed healthy happy bunnies of a good standard. Xxx:)
     
  2. Kammie

    Kammie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Messages:
    4,146
    Likes Received:
    79
    My only advice is don't breed. There are far too many (35,000) rabbits sat in rescues waiting for homes that are being filled by cute fluffy baby bunnies that people have bred because they're cute.
     
  3. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    27,589
    Likes Received:
    12,712
    Agree with what Kammie says
     
  4. wacky

    wacky PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    1
    try goldenbunnies
     
  5. Lil Miss

    Lil Miss PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2010
    Messages:
    4,982
    Likes Received:
    140
    the best advice i can give you is, dont do it

    failing that the second best advice is to find yourself a GOOD breeder near yourself who will be happy to take you under their wing and mentor you (which will take years) you will also need to research genetics (both reccesive and dominant genes and how they work up on each other)
    and by good breeder i mean some one with good ethics and good standards who keeps their rabbits in good conditions and puts them first, with big, suitable hutches, and operate to a strict waiting list, with only a few litters a year, and breed rabbits for the reasons of bettering the breed and improving health and longlivity rather then just for the sake of it
     
  6. swatton42

    swatton42 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    7
    Personally, I'm pro-rescue. So my opinion would be not to, there are plenty of rabbits in rescue at the moment still needing homes and another breeder won't help the situation.

    However, this forum is supposed to support, as far as I understand it, all aspects of pet care, so that includes both breeding and rescue. Seeing that the cats and dogs forums have a breeding section each, it would seem a little unfair for the small animal forum to 'shun' you for it.

    If you decide that breeding is definitely the route you want to go down, find yourself a well established, reputable breeder who can coach you. Make sure you do your research and that you are breeding for ethical reasons such as improving family health lines and genetics, not just for the cute fluffy baby factor.

    Breeding is going to be expensive, hard-work. You will need to know all the cons more so than the pros first. Chances are if you don't then you will go into not expecting the tough side and find it's not what you want to do.

    Personally I have my heart set on opening a rescue and have been doing plenty of research up untill now and will still be researching months down the line.

    If you do your homework and get yourself a 'tutor' then I suppose it's your choice and good luck to you for it.
     
  7. B3rnie

    B3rnie Guest

    What breed are you focusing on? Why have you chosen to breed?

    Sorry to open my post with questions but your answers will help me with what advise to give you :)
     
  8. helebelina

    helebelina PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    765
    Likes Received:
    3
    Agree with the others. Why start breeding bunnies when there are thousands upon thousands of bunnies in rescues across the country with no home to go to? You are just adding to the problem. Especially at this time of year - right after Xmas when all those kids which were bought bunnies 4 Xmas are just getting fed up with them, like the rest of their toys.

    It's just asking for trouble and bunnies are the most abused of all pets in the UK yet being the most popular. And mainly because people just don't know how to look after them. They should NOT be stuck in a cage at the bottom of someone's garden, yet most are. They should have room to run around in, have a friend (they are social animals) and have a constant supply of hay (something most owners neglect) as their teeth will become overgrown otherwise. 80% of their diet should be hay.

    if you breed bunnies you should have at least 4 lines of faultless buns to go before them to be sure to be clear of genetic abnormalities.

    You really need to be sure of what you're doing first. Hope this helps. :eek:
     
  9. wacky

    wacky PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    1
    you can never say there are no faults in your line as faults can go way back further than four how do you know your rabbit is not a glucomer carrier you wont unless you breed withj another carrier and get full blown glucomer no matter how much reserch you do you minght still get some bad luck its weather or not you are prepaired for that it can be very upsetting
     
  10. swatton42

    swatton42 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    7
    You could never guarantee faultless animals whatever you do. Genetic mutations are a random thing and you could just have the luck that it affects one of your offspring.
     
  11. wacky

    wacky PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    1
    i totaly agree thats why if you are going to breed be prepaired for some bad luck as well as good
     
  12. B3rnie

    B3rnie Guest

    Nothing is 100% in life, but when breeding rabbits if you know the genetic history of both rabbits going back at LEAST 4 generations you can rule out a huge amount of problems before you start. Especially with certain breeds, which is why I asked what breed the OP wanted to focus on.

    Yes there are times when new blood has to be bought in, but only experienced BRC recommended breeders should do this IMO as all manner of problems can pop up if you just bring in a new animal, for example I know one breeder who had to stop one of their lines completely (all her rabbits went to pet homes) as a fault was bought up by bringing in a new buck, an inexperienced breeder would not have noticed this fault until it was too late..
     
  13. Obzocky

    Obzocky PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    3
    I'm not going to say "don't breed".

    I am going to ask, like others, why do you want to breed? What is your motivation? Not just "happy, healthy bunnies" but something more.

    Now i'm very much someone who thinks breeding should be reserved for those who wish to be the best. Not just a hobby, not just something fun, not just for money, or producing pets, but for a particular reason. Aims, objectives, goals.

    Do you wish to contribute to a particular breed, to focus on establishing a line of rabbits which have been selected for their health, longevity, structure and temperament?

    If you wish to breed to a good standard you have to ask yourself what standard are you breeding to? Are you going for rabbits that are equally at home on the show bench and the home? Then you need to get yourself to a BRC show and get talking. Go up to people, discuss what you want to do, take in what people are saying about particular breeders, see if anyone is willing to not only give advice but to mentor you.

    I always think a good new breeder will help the future of rabbit rescue as providing they are dedicated and selective they should, in theory, screen prospective owners to the point where the rabbits will not end up in rescue, or at the very least the owners will always know the breeder shall take back whatever animals they have bred should circumstances change.

    There are a host of reasons why I think a new breeder should breed.

    There are more for why I think most people considering breeding should not breed.

    Extensively conducting internet based research into this area is one thing, actually producing plans is another. It would be easier to view this thread positively if there were some indication of your plans and expectations in regards to breeding.
     
  14. swatton42

    swatton42 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    7
    Yes you are right about going back 4 generations reduces the chance of any problems as long as you understand what you are doing when breeding.

    The other person is also right in the fact that a undesirable gene could be passed on for many more than four sets of offspring. It would only become apparent when 2 animals are mated that have both carried that recessive gene for many generations without it being recorded or picked up on.

    The genetic mutation could affect any animal, regardless of either parent carrying that gene. That's why you could end up with 1 albino after decades of breeding pure black rabbits.

    I'm just not really sure why you quoted, all points are relevant but are just slightly different areas of genetics, and we're all just trying to advise on what we know.
     
  15. B3rnie

    B3rnie Guest

    I quoted both posts because "some" people accuse me of singling them out and "some" people use that excuse to justify not knowing genetic histories .

    Probably not the best example you could have used, if both rabbits mated are true blacks then there is no chance what so ever of an albino (REW) kit, black is dominant. It is only the dilution gene can have an impact (but they are still black, just a version of) and the brown gene can also come into play.
    If a breeder knows their colour genetics (which I believe all should before starting to breed) then most will not have random surprise colours, the only time that will happen is if an unknown rabbit is bought into their lines ;)

    Sorry to ramble and I hope you don't think I was having a go at you, but genetics are my thing even though I don't breed :lol:
     
  16. swatton42

    swatton42 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    7
    I agree with you mostly. I still stand by the mutation though. It's in the stages of meiosis when the strands of DNA are introduced from the mother and father. During replication the protein strands are re-assembled in the wrong order and therefore creating a mutated gene. Different to either parents. I used the albinoism because I am a saddo and watch big brother. There was an albino man on there although he was actually black, black parents, black family. For some reason that was the first thing that sprung to mind.

    I don't breed either. I'm kind of glad there is people on here i can have a genetic debate with. Most people I know think I'm weird for liking the subject.

    I don't breed either, have no intention of.
     
  17. Clare7435

    Clare7435 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,927
    Likes Received:
    519
    I can't offer any better advice than you have already been offered but my tke on it is this.... Rabbits in rescue are increasing by the year unfortunately. The last litter for me was ....god i can't remember now but 8 years ago I think but anyway, besides the point, 4 of those 10 bunnies ended up coming back to me which no, wasn't a prob for me but it showed me how little many people think of pets in this day of age and how many people buy on a whim however much you question them and check them out....and since then i have not and will not breed another bun. it's also hard work and involves lots of stress and worry so has to be thought through very carefully and fully researched before hand.
    I love rabbits and the joy of seeing a rabbit go from making a nest to having their litter and nurturing them is an amazing experience but for all of that there can be consequences that have a detrimental affect on both mum and babies so i just won't do it any more.
    God luck in whatever you decide to do but please research into everything both good and bad
     
  18. Hel_79

    Hel_79 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2011
    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    2
    Please note that my comments are generic in keeping with the conversation.

    My response to anybody thinking about breeding is: Why breed? Britain is overflowing with unwanted domesticated animals (including thousands of rabbits), yet we keep breeding more?! We desperately need to start putting the animals first and look at the bigger picture.

    Will you be keeping all the animals you breed? Can you afford vet bills? If giving away or selling, can you 100% guarantee that all the animals you breed will go to loving homes and enjoy the space and care they deserve? And what if their owners decide to breed...can you be sure that the same can be said of them? And of the next owners....??

    Breeding carries a moral responsibility, and these are just some of the questions that must be asked.
     
  19. B3rnie

    B3rnie Guest

    Oh I agree there are mutations of genes, but not in colour (in rabbits). For starters hairless animals are a genetic mutation so yeah I fully agree with that, I was just explaining why your example didn't work in this case :p
    As I said (and I know you agree) it isn't 100% but it helps rule out a huge amount of problems before they start if you know the history, so it is best to start with rabbits that are known rather than sticking two bunnies together and preparing for some bad luck...
    (I watched that BB too :lol:)
    But yay I have found another genetic freak, we are few and far between (especially ones that don't breed :lol:)
     
  20. swatton42

    swatton42 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    7
    It is exciting that I am not the only 1. I think our point still stands though that the OP decides they wish to breed, that all of this is very important to know, and needs someone who understands what's going on to guide them.

    I've never seen a hairless rabbit, I don't imagine them being is 'cute' looking as hairless guinea pigs or cats. I'm not a big fan of hairless dogs either.

    And since we are already so off topic, celeb big brother is starting soon. Not as good without Davina.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice