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Brain tumour

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Smalldogs, Dec 31, 2019.


  1. Smalldogs

    Smalldogs PetForums Member

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    Have just had a distressing phone call from a friend telling us his Labrador has now been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour. The dog has been undergoing tests for a while, with possibilities of thyroid trouble or Horner's syndrome, but now a brain scan has shown the worst. Options seem to be chemotherapy, with possibility of giving the dog a couple more years, or steroids, giving shorter lifetime but easing discomfort in the meantime. This is a sweet and very much loved dog, and owner is torn between wanting to do the best for him and not wanting to put him through stressful treatment which might only prolong discomfort.

    I know nothing about brain tumours and their treatment. Have been looking up on line, and it seems to me that chemotherapy would entail quite a lot of travel (possibly putting owner's job at risk if he has to take time off), cost a lot more than I suspect owner can realistically spare, be quite a lot to put a dog through, and have no guarantee of results. I've seen the treatment quoted as twelve sessions over four weeks, and none of the treatment centres seem to be near us in the south-west, so from where I'm standing it doesn't sound like the best option, given that it wouldn't give the dog his full lifespan and that there are possible bad side effects. But I know that if it were my dog I would be absolutely torn as to what to do, as is this dog's owner.

    Has anyone any helpful/supportive/practical comments that I can pass on? This is a horrible thing to happen to a great dog and a great owner, and I would love to be able to help in some way, even if only to support a decision to let the dog go.
     
  2. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Oh how sad. From what I've heard chemotherapy takes its toll, and if the prognosis isn't good it's not something I'd put my pet through personally, just to possibly get an extra year or so with the dog feeling like crap. I know what chemo is like for people and it's not nice, I can't imagine how a pet must feel not even knowing why they feel like that. BUT that's just me, and if the dog is otherwise fit and healthy and they can get it through insurance then it's something to consider.
    It sounds like it's a quality over quantity situation here, and if they go for chemo are they doing it for the dog or for themselves?
     
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  3. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    I'm sorry I have not advise for your friend, but I would never put my dog though long team treatment and make him suffer and to loss him in the end, it wouldn't be fair on the dog. I'd enjoy what time we had left together and let him go before he started to suffer.
     
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  4. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    I would not put an animal through chemo, but would perhaps look to keep them happy and free from pain but pts at the first inkling tbh.
     
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  5. EmCHammer

    EmCHammer PetForums VIP

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    Both my previous dogs had brain tumours..

    One had a pituatury gland one and had radiotherapy and suffered no side effects.

    My other one had a trigeminal nerve tumour and had metronomic chemo. She had no side effects for a good few months and as soon as she did we stopped.

    The dose that dogs get for both is far less than they would give humans as the dogs cant consent so they won't give strong/ aggressive doses

    It's not overly cheap but insurance paid for my dogs both time
     
  6. Smalldogs

    Smalldogs PetForums Member

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    Thank you to those who have replied. Friend has pretty much decided against chemo and is looking at ways of making dog's life as happy and comfortable as possible. Vet has prescribed corticosteroids, and friend is researching CBD oil, as a lot of people recommend this for helping with cancer. It's a very complicated field to research, as apparently many oils advertised as CBD oil for dogs don't contain the most important ingredient. Anyone know anything about this? (I think our friend is doing better with his research than I am - he's been up all night contacting forums and firms and individuals on-line - but any tips would be appreciated.)
     
    Sarah H likes this.
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