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Boxing tips...

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Orla, Oct 2, 2020.


  1. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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    Dylan finally had his first vaccination yesterday (he was too sick for the first couple of months in rescue so couldn’t even be added to the waiting list until a couple of months ago). Despite me practising picking him up and popping him on the bed to get used to being handled like that he was a nightmare to box. I opted for a top loading wire carrier, popped him in, had a friend there to pop the lid down, and he managed to squirm free and past the lid before we got it down. Tried again, same result. Eventually dragged out the big plastic front loader the rescue delivered him in. My friend scruffed him and we dropped him in bum first, but still spent ages prying his feet from the sides to get him in. Any other tips? Having been a rescue and having been trapped, he is so against being contained. I don’t normally have anyone to help so really don’t know how I’ll do this in future. On the plus, he had forgiven me and was back on my knee within a couple of hours! X
     
  2. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    Cats always associate carriers with bad things. Mine run the second they see one then smugly sniff at the occupant when they realise they are not today's 'victim'.

    I use top opening carriers, and gently lower the cat in while controlling it's legs to stop it splaying across the opening. Once in, I place the hand that was supporting the cats bottom onto its shoulders, then close the top using the other hand. Once the wire top is against my arm I slip my hand out so that the cat has less opportunity to spring out.

    However, I've heard that leaving the box out as a bed can work, as can feeding the cat in there. But I'm not sure how easily accepted it would be once the bad association has already been made.
     
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  3. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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    Thanks @Tigermoon that was what we were attempting with the wire carrier but he was wise to that trick and forced his big old Tom cat head out before I could get it shut.

    I love the comment about the others smuggly sniffing the victim!!! I’m hoping once he realises he gets to come back from the vets and doesn’t get moved back to a shelter he will be easier. X
     
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  4. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    Pet remedy sprayed in a day before may help or at least relieve stress somewhat on the vet trip.
     
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  5. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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    Thanks @Summercat he actually was fine on the journey, it’s just getting the bugger boxed that is the issue. I’m really lucky. The vet is literally 5 mins away so the journey isn’t traumatic once he is in a box. Wonder if he might take more to a wicker box. @chillminx did you say you had one of those?
     
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  6. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Yes, I have 2 of the wicker type as my boys have always been much easier to get into that sort of carrier ever since I adopted them as 16 month olds.

    They both hated the wire carriers and would fight like the dickens whenever I tried to get either of them in one of those. This included a top loading wire carrier and an extra large wire carrier.

    The girls on the other hand are happier in wire carriers. ;)

    I used to have some of the more closed-in plastic carriers but all my cats hated them.
     
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  7. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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    Thanks. How are they size-wise? He’s 4.7 kg with long lanky legs and a big Tom cat head (late neutered street boy!) I’m sure I’ve seen one in zooplus?
     
  8. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    My wicker carriers are tall enough for my boy to sit upright in. Both he (and his brother who died last year) are/were big boys, long legged and long in the body. The brother was a big longhaired chunky boy and he was fine with head room in the wicker carrier. The carriers are also big enough for the cat to curl up in.

    Note: when looking at wicker carriers, ensure there are no sharp ends of wicker sticking out inside the carrier, as these could cause injury to the cat while the carrier is in motion.

    Pets Corner sells a lovely big wicker carrier, well finished. But it was too wide to get into the back seat of my 2 door car. The smaller size would be too small for a big cat.
     
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  9. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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  10. Booksniffer

    Booksniffer PetForums Newbie

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    50368535662_641f73fcd5_c.jpg


    This is one of the two carriers that are in my living room permanently; they're very popular beds!

    (It looks like it overhangs more than it does, in reality it's perhaps 1 or 2 centimeter. The carrier is wedged in a corner formed by the stuff behind it, very stable)

    We also practice with me gently coaxing a cat into the carrier at various times of day, then giving them a (high-value) treat while inside, closing the front opening and carrying it around for a bit (while I keep giving treats through a small corner left open).

    It takes a *lot* of stress out of vet visit, for both cats and human! ;)


    With one of my previous cats, it was a week-long process getting her into the carrier, which involved feeding her near the carrier, then in front of it, and finally inside it... Which is not much use in emergencies, or when a cat has to fast for some reason (or is so ill they're not interested in food).
     
  11. Booksniffer

    Booksniffer PetForums Newbie

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    Also, I love having the carriers handy & having the cats go inside willingly; a few years ago we were evacuated suddenly because of a fire in the building.

    At the time, I only had a dog, who was easy to grab & bring along.
    If I'd had cats like my previous one, who feared the carrier, I don't know what I would have done!


    I am planning to work on a command that is 'neutral', not depending on my voice (perhaps a handclap or a certain whistle) that will tell the cats to go into ther carriers; that way, even neighbours or strangers could do it.
     
  12. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Orla likes this.
  13. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Booksniffer - having found the right carrier for each of my cats, it is no problem getting them to go in them. :)

    The real problem is the car journey e.g to the vets. They all get very stressed by it. Perhaps if I took them somewhere by car every day they might get used to it eventually but that would be too much for me to keep doing every day.
     
  14. Cully

    Cully PetForums VIP

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    Thankfully I have never had any problem getting cats into carriers as they have all been part of the furniture.
    This is the one I have now, perched up high where she loves to lie and keep an eye on things.
    IMG_20201004_080941~3.jpg

    It's fabric with a tubular metal folding frame. Has three openings and strong mesh panels. Quite large, it's actually for small dogs too.
    From Amazon but I believe is available at many other stores. I think it was around £20.
     
  15. SbanR

    SbanR PetForums VIP

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    My carrier sits permanently open, in my bed room.
    Previous cats used to sleep in it. They still knew the difference when put in it, ready for a trip to the vet!
     
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  16. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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    My girl will sleep in absolutely anything I put out. Dylan so far won’t sleep inside anything but I’m going to keep trying x
     
  17. Orla

    Orla PetForums VIP

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    what carrier is that? I’ve never seen anything like that!
     
  18. Psygon

    Psygon Yoshi Tonks! :-)

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    At one point we decided to try and get the tonks used to car journeys. This was when we just had Ted and Darcy and planned to possibly go on a long holiday to my mum's. Anyway, for about 3 months we took them on short trips in the car and they just wailed and wailed and wailed. They never got used to it, they always wailed louder if a motorcycle went by... Eventually we thought maybe we need to take a longer journey as people told us they would quieten down eventually so we did. And they didn't. They still just wailed the whole way there and back :D

    Jammy is much better with journeys having been to cat shows, and Waffles is to a degree. But the tabby tonks resolutely hate cars.

    We never did take them away with us. :D
     
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  19. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Psygon - I fear that I may have a similar experience to yours, were I to take my cats out in the car regularly. :D

    Someone once suggested to me it was the association of the vet's with the car ride, and that I should try and break the association by taking them to "nice" places in the car, LOL. But I don't think this is so, as they calm down once we reach the vets and are OK throughout the consultations. Once back in the car for the homeward journey the wailing starts again! :(
     
  20. urbantigers

    urbantigers PetForums VIP

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    Mosi is a nightmare to get into the carrier. Even though it’s left out in the living room permanently, with some vet bed in the bottom (and he does go inside occasionally). Catching him and getting him in sounds like I am torturing him. However, once he’s in, he’s not too bad on the journey at all, and is quite confident at the other end getting out. Kito on the other hand, tends not to catch on what I’m up to so I get him in with much more ease but the journey... oh my god, I feel as though I’m going to have a nervous breakdown and it’s a miracle I don’t crash the car with him shouting all the way there at the top of his voice. I use the pet cabrio solid plastic ones and find they work well for me.
     
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