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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi my name is david and i have an 9 month old border collie pup called sam. I have had him for nearly 2 months and he is a great wee dog, however during the last month or so the dog next door has had a go at him and a pair of golden retreivers went for him when i had him out for a walk. At all times sam was on his leash and always approached dogs in a friendly playful manner. now when he sees another dog he starts barking and trying to get at the dog he has also tried to chase passing cars when we're out for a walk. Has anyone had a problem like this before? if so how did you stop this bad behaviour. I am quite worried about this as he only started doing it over the last week or so.

David
 

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Hi and welcome to the wonderful world of border collies ,wish you were nearer i would love to help you with your boy , as a matter of intrest were abouts are you ?
my advice to you would be
1st find a training class near to you and go along and check out there training methods that they suit you and your dog and make the problems you are having clear to them also you need to get the dog into you, is it just you and Sam ? is Sam a rescue dog ? just figure from you saying he is 9 months and you got him at 6 months , please feel free to pm for more help
 

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Because of the attacks he will now feel very defensive when on lead, dogs either have a fight or flight response, they cant flee on lead, therefore they will fight. Dogs can feel very restricted on lead, therefore hes most proberly getting defensive on lead at other dogs because of what happened.

I would enroll him in a training class, he will get great socialisation that he needs, you will get lots of basic training which will help you both. Also make sure you find some nice friendly dogs that he can socialise with.

Car chasing is well known in border collies and it is something that is extremely dangerous and needs to be sorted ASAP. I knew a border collie that had severe car chasing behaviour and had to be PTS. It got taken to field miles and miles away from any road, and would look for cars to chase, could not get her focused ever because she was just waiting for cars.The only time she would focus for a few seconds was in a enclosed room, and even that was difficult. Obviously this is severe, but the behaviour does need to be corrected. Contact a trainer and they can give you advice on how to correct it.

You havent had him for long, so it will take time for him to settle in and for you both to create a bond. Training classes will help alot.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum.

I would imagine his behaviour towards other dogs has been caused by your neighbour's dog and the two retrievers - he's warning them off.

Collies are notorious car chasers, or anything else that moves at speed.

As Leoti has already said, a decent trainer would help you with both of these issues.
 

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Hi - I can't offer any help with the dog problem as I haven't had to deal with that myself.

The way I sorted my collie's brief flirtation with cars was to go and sit in a bus shelter at the side of a fairly busy road, ignore any interest in the cars and reward any interaction with me. We did this a few times a day for a week or so and he began to get fed up with the cars as I was more interesting and since then he's not really bothered about them.
 

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Your dog is still young so deal with the problem NOW before it gets out of hand. I suggest that training classes are a great idea and also when out walking get your dog to 'sit' or 'down' and 'wait' when cars are passing (keep his attention) give praise throughout with a treat at the end when the dog has remained still. This will take some time to master but persevere. as with most border collies they need more than just a walk and perhaps you could enlist in an agility or flyball club, the dog will then have a focus and also get to socilise with other dogs. If you haven't allready I would suggest the dog is neutered which will help with any dominance issue. Most collies are protective of their owners and surroundings, please take control of him before he takes control of you!
Good Luck
Sonya4403
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks folks i have looked into training classes and a course is starting in rwo weeks so i will be taking him to them. I will start applying the tips that have been given to me, i will keep in touch and let you all know how sam
 

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I have a collie a week off his first birthday...I know where you are coming from, it seems a light comes on & the chase/herd instinct kicks in. I work on asking him to do something else....i find if collies are left to make their own decisions about a fast moving object then it usually involves a chase....mine decided motorbikes & running/skipping kids were his kind of thing! I use simple reward based attention exercises, taught at home first without distraction & then used out and about on walks. You sometimes need eyes in the back of your head, but i think if you give them a behaviour to do that is acceptable...sit, down, look at me, etc then you can teach them to do that instead of unacceptable behaviour ie;chasing.
I think a good, collie savvy training class is so important, hope you find one :D

p.s. if you regularly meet noodles whose dogs have a go at yours, then do not be afraid to ask them politely and loudly to get their dogs under control. It really hacks me off! There is a guy near us with two massive black dogs who used to terrorise the life out of my last collie for fun....I shan't say what my private nickname for that man is :prrr:
 

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I saw a young border collie on lead last Sunday that my goldie was a bit overbearing on, hope that wasn't you, if it was I can only apologise. She didn't mean any harm, I think it was because he's nervous she gets more worried too.:rolleyes:
 

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Your dog is still young so deal with the problem NOW before it gets out of hand. I suggest that training classes are a great idea and also when out walking get your dog to 'sit' or 'down' and 'wait' when cars are passing (keep his attention) give praise throughout with a treat at the end when the dog has remained still. This will take some time to master but persevere. as with most border collies they need more than just a walk and perhaps you could enlist in an agility or flyball club, the dog will then have a focus and also get to socilise with other dogs. If you haven't allready I would suggest the dog is neutered which will help with any dominance issue. Most collies are protective of their owners and surroundings, please take control of him before he takes control of you!
Good Luck
Sonya4403
As he's only 9 months if I read the OP correctly he's too young for agility or flyball yet.
I would also say do NOT have him neutered yet (leaving aside the "if at all" arguement for another time) because:
1. he's having issues with other dogs that might be to some extent caused by fear so neutering could escalate this rather than eliminate it.
2. he's still got a good bit of growing to do and especially if you are thinking of doing dog sports like agility or flyball when he's older you don't want to risk his joints by getting him neutered before he's physically mature.
 
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