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Blood typing and responsibilty

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by Alansw8, Aug 5, 2009.


  1. Alansw8

    Alansw8 PetForums Senior

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    Hi there peeps.

    Bit of a strange one this.

    A friend has just enquired to a stud owner regarding possibility using of their boy and what blood group he was with the response:

    i thanks for the enquiry but i don't blood group my boys as i don't believe we should be eradicating the ab blood group.

    My point of view is if they are putting their boy up for stud they should know his blood grouping as i am sure any queen owner would be devastated to lose their kittens through not knowing this.
     
    #1 Alansw8, Aug 5, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2009
  2. messyhearts

    messyhearts PetForums VIP

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    What a peculiar lack of concern!
     
  3. Cat_Crazy

    Cat_Crazy PetForums VIP

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    I would stear clear.

    I would not use any stud without knowing their blood type, it's too risky!
     
  4. Alansw8

    Alansw8 PetForums Senior

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    Maybe their girls have been blood group A so they havent had the need to worry but i think maybe the gccf should act upon it making compulsory for stud owners to have their cat blood typed as it only costs 30.00.

    Make me wonder too if they have been pkd tested too.:):)
     
  5. kozykatz

    kozykatz PetForums VIP

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    I've never tested any of my cats' blood group because by all accounts all 3 of my breeds are virtually 100% group A. I have never to my knowledge had any kitten losses due to NI, certainly have never seen any of the usually reported symptoms.

    I would have thought it was sensible to test in those breeds with a significant percentage of group B.
     
  6. Alansw8

    Alansw8 PetForums Senior

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    In the British there are a lot of B's so if a breeder is using their stud as open i do feel strongly it is their responsibility to have him typed.

    Or as some one else said walk away, but i would make my feelings known that i dont agree with him been open stud with him not been typed.

    It saves a lot of heartache in the long run:):)
     
  7. Angelic1

    Angelic1 PetForums Member

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    How bizarre Alan!

    I've just recently had the very same comment back from a breeder when I enquired about a stud for my BSH girl.

    I was so surprised by the response as she has been breeding for many years!
    I know how important this is with BSH's as it can be totally devastating if it all goes wrong.
    :eek:

    She did not know her cats blood groups at all. Apparently as she was usually at closed stud it didn't really matter. But she was now offering this service to me....so I feel it was only right and fair that she should know their blood group.

    I too thought this was irresponsible. Also surely she should have known when she bought her own studs in...or her queens so that they were a match for her own breeding program and the safety of her own kittens?
    :confused:
     
  8. How bloody irresponsible. I would not be using that stud, and the breeder would get a piece of my mind.

    I have seen first hand the results of NI in a foster girl of mine, its bloody heartbreaking! Its very rare to have this happen in moggies, so i can only assume there was a fair amount of pedigree breeding in back generations. I will never know though as like so many the mum cat was dumped.
     
  9. Angelic1

    Angelic1 PetForums Member

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    Quite right...I won't be using her stud services! I could not bare to take the risk.:)
     
  10. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen PetForums Member

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    How ignorant. Knowing the blood group of our breeding cats has nothing to do with eradicating any blood type. It's simply about knowing which matings that are safe and not.

    I'm OK with stud owners not blood typing as long as they don't let their studs mate b-females!

    I've mated my A-female with an untested stud and I don't consider the stud owner irresponsible since I know she wouldn't breed him with a b-female. She's having him practise "safe sex".;)
     
  11. Faerie Queene

    Faerie Queene PetForums Member

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    Hi.:)
    My 3 cats are neutured, so I'm not in a position to breed, but I have found this thread very interesting.
    I really don't know anything about blood testing for type (A / B ) and breeding, and also NI, so for the benefit of me and anyone else reading this, could someone please post a brief summary of this most fascinating subject?
    Thank you in advance.
    (I know I could Google this, but what I didn't want to do was go along the wrong path, and post a load of rubbish.)
     
  12. Jen26

    Jen26 PetForums VIP

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    This may be of some interest to you:)

    Type B frequency Breeds

    None Siamese and related breeds, Burmese, Tonkinese, Russian blue

    1-10% Maine Coone, Norwegian Forest, DSH, DLH

    11-20% Abyssinian, Birman, Himalayan, Persian, Somali, Sphinx, Scottish fold

    20-45% Exotic and British shorthair cats, Cornish and Devon Rex

    Type AB DSH, Scottish fold, Birman, British shorthair, Somali, Bengal, Abyssinian
     
  13. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen PetForums Member

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    A brief summary:

    There are three feline blood types: A, Ab and b. A is dominant over Ab and b (therefor the capital A), Ab literally is a mix of A and b and is dominant over b and of course b is totally recessive.

    A- and b-cats produce antibodies against each other but A-cats normally only produce very low titres that won't harm a b-cat. Ab-cats don't produce any antibodies, if they would they would produce antibodies that attack their own erythrocytes which of course is bad and then b-cats generally produce high titres of A-antibodies. This is the problem.

    If a b-female is bred with an A- or an Ab-cat she'll pass antibodies agains blood type A through the colostrum. The antibodies till destroy the A- or Ab-kittens erythrocytes. This may cause necrosis in the outer limbs (ears, tip of the tail and toes) and worse case scenario is that the kittens die. The same thing happens if a blood transfusion is done.

    So, short story is that b-females that are bred with any male that isn't blood type b shouldn't be allowed to feed the kittens the first 24 hours. After 24 hours the gut closure has occured in the kittens, they don't absorb the antibodies and they can safely nurse from their mother. Short huh...
     
    bichonsrus and Jen26 like this.
  14. Faerie Queene

    Faerie Queene PetForums Member

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    Gosh - thank you!
    Well, that is certainly a worry.
    I would have thought that for what, £30, it would be prudent to have one's cat blood type tested. The thought of kittens being affected by this or at worst dying, because the parents weren't tested, would trouble me.
    Thank you again, Jen26 and Cerridwen.
    Edited to add : So what is NI and pkd?
    Thank you in advance.
     
    #14 Faerie Queene, Aug 10, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2009
  15. Jen26

    Jen26 PetForums VIP

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    NI = neonatal isoerythrolysis
    PKD = Polycystic Kidney Disease
     
  16. Cerridwen

    Cerridwen PetForums Member

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    And neonatal isoerythrolysis is what it's called when the antibodies passed over through the colostrum and attack the kittens erythrocytes.
     
  17. bichonsrus

    bichonsrus PetForums Senior

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    Well you learn something new everyday! Thanks for letting us know, i do get confused with all the abbreviations i see on some posts that i sometimes just stop reading, lol.
     
  18. lauren001

    lauren001 PetForums VIP

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    It is a very simple test, that saves lives.
    I cannot also see how anyone would not want to do this in a breed that has a mixture of blood groups.

    I suppose though if you always observed the 16-24 hour rule for the kittens then it wouldn't matter.
    But if you were selling kittens for breeding then the purchasers would want to know in advance I presume.
     
  19. Jen26

    Jen26 PetForums VIP

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    I think it depends from breeder to breeder. I would want to know what I was buying but some stud owners with B studs probably arent as fussed what blood group they are buying in.

    Myself I would not mix blood groups, I have B blood group and luckily there are plenty of B studs within a reasonable distance so I dont see the need to mix. I personally think seperating mom from kittens for the first 24hrs is stressfull for mom in those precious first hours where she should be bonding with her kittens and asking for trouble.
     
  20. lauren001

    lauren001 PetForums VIP

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    I would think so too.
     
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