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Blended Veggies & Meat for the BARF Diet (WARNING GORY PICS!)

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Sleeping_Lion, Jun 3, 2010.


  1. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    I did these as two threads on another forum and thought I'd combine them on here (someone asked on another thread for the meaty bit, if you are squeamish, please do not scroll down!!!!), it shows the bits I feed my dogs, and what I do to prepare it:

    I've been meaning to do this for a while, as I get asked, and see people post asking the question about what blended veg to feed, how much to feed etc. So whilst preparing a batch of veggies over the last day, I've even taken photos, to help people see clearly how I go about it, and hopefully other barf/raw feeders will add in their bits, for anyone who searches for info about it on the forum.

    First up is the selection of vegetables, which can be anything really, with a mix across the range of root, leaf and pulse. I was outside doing this yesterday as it was warm enough, and Indie and Tau got the occasional treats chucked their way. The only couple of things to avoid are broccolli and onions, although mine do occasionally get bits of broccolli that are left over, I don't buy it specifically to put in their veg mix.

    [​IMG]

    Carrots are a useful source of vitamins A, B1, B6, C and K.
    Cabbage (dark green like savoy) are a useful source of vitamins B1, Folate and C, along with Sulphur.
    Swede is a useful source of vitamins B1, B6, Folate and C.
    Parsnips are a useful source of vitamins B1, B6, Folate, C, along with Potassium and Phosphorus.
    Green beans are a useful source of vitamins A, Folate and C.

    Other things I put in there are:

    Cauliflower is a useful source of vitamins B1, B6, C and K, along with Potassium.
    Spinach is a useful source of vitamins A, B6, Folate, C and K, along with Calcium, Iron, Phosphorus, and Magnesium.
    Sweet Potato is a useful source of vitamins A, B1, B6, C and E, along with Potassium.
    Tomato is a useful source of vitamins A, B6 and C.

    I do sometimes put apple, banana or pear into their veg mix, and are good sources of vitamin C, B6 and C, along with Potassium and Magnesium.

    I chop them all up and put them into one of those hessian bags ready to blend:

    [​IMG]

    The nuts are in there because they have a good mix of vitamins and minerals, so I put a good size handful in there (along with a couple of cloves of garlic):

    [​IMG]

    Almonds - B vitamins, E / Calcium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosophorus and Zinc
    Brazils - B1, B6 / Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur, Selenium and Zinc
    Cashews - B1, B6 / Copper, Iron, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur, Selenium and Zinc
    Hazelnuts - B1, B6 / Calcium, Potassium, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur and Zinc
    Peanuts - B1, B6, Folate and Niacin / Copper, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur and Zinc
    Pecans - B1 / Copper, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Sulphur and Zinc
    Walnuts - B6 / Copper, Magnesium and Phosphorus

    Garlic has two ‘medicinal’ ingredients, Allicin and Diallyl Sulphides. Allicin is active once garlic is chopped or crushed, and is linked to anti biotic and anti fungal properties. Diallyl Sulphides is linked to improving blood and circulation, again, it is more effective when chopped/crushed.

    The other things that go into their food are one capful of apple cider vinegar, and a level teaspoon of turmeric. Apple cider vinegar is linked to healthy bones, and helps fight against osteoperosis, containing manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium and silicon. It is also an anti-cancer agent containing beta carotene and phytochemicals that help in cancer prevention. Turmeric has been linked to anti inflammatory, anti bacterial, and liver and heart protecting effects. It is used to used to ease joint pain, and inflammation associated with arthritis, and is a good source of antioxidants.

    [​IMG]

    Finally, they also get a couple of tablespoons of oil mixed in, in this case, I’ve reserved oil that I used to make a confit previously, so it’s got bits of meat in there, yum!!

    [​IMG]

    So this is it, all in a mixing bowl…

    [​IMG]

    And once it’s all blended, and mixed in, I use left over plastic take away tubs, and freeze it. Then I cut off approx one quarter to mix in with their breakfast, and leave it to defrost while I take the girls on their morning walk.

    [​IMG]

    So what do these vitamins do?

    Vitamin A – vision, bone growth, reproduction and health of skin, also acts as an antioxidant.
    Vitamin B1 – also known as thiamin, helps convert carbohydrates and fats into energy. Cannot be stored in the body, but once absorbed, it is concentrated in muscle tissue.
    Vitamin B2 – also known as riboflavin, necessary for the release of energy from carbohydrates, and for normal growth and development.
    Niacin – necessary for production and breakdown of glucose, fats and amino acids, development, maintenance and function of the skin, intestine and stomach, as well as the nervous system, and in manufacturing dna.
    Pantothenic acid – a b-complex vitamin, also known as B5, helps break down proteins, and their amino acids, fats and carbohydrates enabling the production of energy.
    B6 – also known as pyridoxine, involved in the production and digestion of amino acids, and helps the body manufacture the hormone insulin. It is involved with anti bodies that fight infection, and certain chemicals that send messages between nerve cells, as well as in the production of histamine.
    Vitamin B12 – also known as cyanocobalamin or cobalamin, I sreleased from food in the stomach, and has to bind with a protein called intrinsic factor to be able to be absorbed by the body. It is necessary for normal growth and development.
    Biotin – a b-complex vitamin, essential for converting proteins, carbohydrates and fats into forms the body can use.
    Folate – another b-complex vitamins, plays a vital role in the substance that makes up our genes, working with vitamin B12 to form haemoglobin, and converting the amino acid homocysteine to methionine.
    Vitamin C – also known as ascorbic acid, is the least stable of vitamins and destroyed by processing, essential for the formation of collagen, an important structural protein that strengthens bones and blood vessels.
    Vitamin D – a fat soluble vitamin that has an essential role in the absorbption and use of calcium.
    Vitamin E – one of natures most effective antioxidants, and protects the body against free radicals.
    Vitamin K – an essential component in the body’s normal blood clotting process.

    Calcium – the main mineral present in bones and teeth.
    Magnesium – plays a vital role in the formation of bones, teeth, and with the minerals calcium, sodium and potassium, is involved in transmitting nerve signals.
    Phosphorus – essential for bones and teeth.
    Potassium – together with sodium and chloride potassium is involved in controlling the amount of water and maintaining the correct acid-alkali balance in the body.
    Sodium – vital for controlling the amount of water in the body, maintaining normal pH of blood, transmitting nerve signals and helping in muscular contraction.
    Sulphur – plays a key role in the manufacture of amino acids and in the conversion of carbohydrates to a form that the body can use.
    Chromium – works with insulin to help bind it to it’s receptors.
    Copper – plays a key role in several body function, including production of pigment in skin, hair and eyes, production of healthy bones, teeth and heart, and the protection of body cells from chemical damage.
    Iodine – associated with thyroid function.
    Iron – an essential mineral in all cells, although only needed in small quantities, is a component of haemoglobin, the oxygen carrying protein in red blood cells.
    Selenium – is an antioxidant and part of an enzyme that protects cells from the damaging effects of free radicals.
    Zinc – needed in minute amounts, essential for the breakdown of carbohydrates, fats and proteins, in normal cell division, growth and repair.


    Hope that helps explain the role of the veggies, and in combination with the meat and offal, it provides an important role I feel in a BARF diet.

    The Meat Part (LAST WARNING, DO NOT SCROLL DOWN IF YOU DON'T LIKE SEEING RAW MEAT PREPARED)

    Raw feeding isn't for everyone, but following on from the veggie bit I did a while back, I thought I'd do the equivalent post for meat, and try and explain a bit about what I include in their diet, and why. I've included photographs so people can see what the meats look like, not everyone has seen a beast (beef) heart for example, and some might not know the easiest way to take apart a lamb rib cage, so if you're squeamish, please be aware I've included photographs giving examples of these sorts of things.

    I have only put in a bit of information about tripe from a useful tripe website, as I have included a link at the end, where you can read in full about the nutritional value of each of the raw meats, and the link also contains a very useful table showing how the vitamins and minerals are used.

    First up is tripe, which mine get for breakfast approximately five times a week.

    Green Tripe (not the bleached white stuff from the butchers)
    [​IMG]

    Tripe is the stomach of ruminating animals. These animals (i.e. cattle, buffalo, sheep, deer, goats, antelope, etc.) are classified as being four-footed, hooved, cud chewing mamals with a stomach that consists of four chambers. The four chambers of such a stomach are known as the rumen, reticulum, omasum and the abomasum. The food the animal eats (i.e. grass, hay) is swallowed unchewed and passes into the rumen and reticulum where it is then regurgitated, chewed and mixed with saliva. It is again swallowed and then passed through the reticulum and omasum into the abomasum, where it is then further broken down by the gastric juices, amino acids and other digestive enzymes.

    In an analysis of a sample of green tripe by a Woodson-Tenant Lab in Atlanta, Georgia, it was discovered that the calcium:phosphorous ratio is 1:1, the overall pH is on the acidic side which is better for digestion, protein is 15.1, fat 11.7 and it contained the essential fatty acids, Linoleic and Linolenic, in their recommended proportions. Also discovered, was the presence of Lactic Acid Bacteria. Lactic Acid Bacteria, also known as Lactobacillus Acidophilus, is the good intestinal bacteria. It is the main ingredient in probiotics.

    The tripe I get comes in 2lb bags, which I split between my two for breakfast, and mix in their blended veggies.


    Raw Heart (Lamb or Beast (Beef))

    I buy a mix of beast and lambs hearts, and chop it up and bag in portion sizes. They either get it as a meal on it’s own, or I use it over a couple of days adding bits in to their other food. The meat has a texture like steak, and it doesn’t smell like liver, kidneys or other offal.

    A whole heart
    [​IMG]

    This shows the texture of the meat
    [​IMG]

    And here it is bagged up and frozen
    [​IMG]


    Raw Lamb Bones

    I get free bones from my local butchers, and they usually come supplied as whole rib cages. If you’re squeamish, and don’t like seeing how to take apart a carcass, don’t scroll down.



    [​IMG]

    You will need a good pair of poultry shears and a sharp, small knife to make it easy to take the carcasses apart, first off, use the poultry shears to cut along the bottom of the ribs, about 2-3 inches in width.
    [​IMG]

    From the back of the rib cage, where the ribs are longest, count two or three ribs in (depending on the size, for larger count three ribs in) and slide a knife down inbetween the third and fourth rib, making sure you cut right down to the backbone. Hold down the other rib cage from inside, and pull the three ribs back from the carcass, they should dislocate and tear away fairly easily. Do the same for the other side, although it isn’t as easy without having the full rib cage to pull against, it shouldn’t be too difficult.
    [​IMG]

    Using the sharp knife, place the lamb bones resting upright on the ribs that are left, with the neck in your left hand, and cut down in front of the first dorsal bone on the rib cage. Then push down hard so that the neck part separates from the back, cut around the sides and base to separate any muscle tissue left on there, and pull apart.
    [​IMG]

    From one rib cage you should end up with nice neat pieces like this.
    [​IMG]

    I would feed the neck/back parts each as one meal, and depending on the size fatty rib cage bottom, possibly include the ribs broken away as one meal – so out of that one rib cage there should be enough for four meals as follows – neck; back with small ribs; fatty rib cage with three ribs x 2

    I use bones mainly for their evening meal, which they get at around 5pm, and they absolutely love them!!

    The chicken they get is either chicken carcasses stripped of most of the meat, one and a half carcasses, which has the breast and about half of the backbones is enough for one meal; or else I get chicken wings, the last two digits, six of which make enough for one meal. Fortunately I don’t have to chop chicken up, but do usually have to pay for it, and depending on whether I get it from the butchers or another supplier, there is more meat on the carcasses, and so the price varies between approx £2.50 to £5 for a large box.

    Liver

    I use lambs liver, and along with tinned fish, this is the only meat I don’t feed raw. Liver can be high in vitamin A, and I have found in the past it can make mine loose, and so I cook the liver, either in water, or in goats milk. They still absolutely love it, and it has good nutritional value for them.
    [​IMG]

    Tubbed up and ready to freeze, one tub is fine split between two, and if needs be, I’ll add a bit of something else if I think it isn’t quite enough
    [​IMG]

    I also feed mine tinned fish in tomato sauce, or oil, simply adding a 125g tin shared between the two, once or twice a week. You can feed fish raw, but I have found with my two that it doesn’t always suit them, and they end up bringing it back up half the time.

    I also give them lambs kidneys, which I have found fine to feed raw, and I add them as part of a meal, usually with something like beast heart.

    They get a whole raw egg, once or twice a week, shell and all, and they also get any shells left over from cooking.

    I don't use pork bones, because you need to be sure of the source so that they are free from internal parasites. Nor do I feed many beef bones, just the occasional marrow bone as a treat for half an hour or so, because they are much more dense, and wear the teeth down that much quicker.

    This link saves me quite a bit of typing, and gives the nutritional values for a variety of raw meats, and shows the vitamins and minerals they provide, as well as telling you how they are used.

    Useful articles about the nutritional value of raw meats

    That's how I use the meat part of the BARF diet, I know others might do it differently, but after feeding my two from pups, and making a few additions and changes along the way, I'm happy with the variety and amounts they get and am glad I don't feel the need to use any fillers. As before, if anyone wants a copy of the BARF sheet I use, please feel free to pm me and ask, it's drawn up from what I've read and experienced. It would be good if others who feed can add bits about their experiences as well, and any thing they do differently.

    Typical menu for my Labradors:

    For adult Labs:

    Monday
    Breakfast - 1lb green tripe, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 300-400g chicken carcasses & 125g tinned sardines

    Tuesday
    Breakfast - 1lb green tripe, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 300-400g chicken carcasses

    Wednesday
    Breakfast - 250-400g chicken carcasses, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 250g liver cooked in goats milk, 150g chicken carcasses

    Thursday
    Breakfast - 1lb green tripe, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 300-400g chicken carcasses

    Friday
    Breakfast - 1lb green tripe, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 300-400g chicken carcasses

    Saturday
    Breakfast - 250-400g chicken carcasses, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 250g beef/lambs heart

    Sunday
    Breakfast - 1lb green tripe, 40g blended veggies
    Tea - 300-400g chicken carcasses


    Where ever I use chicken carcasses, I interchange with lamb bones as well. I also give other food regularly, such as a whole raw egg, cottage cheese, natural yoghurt, and any appropriate left overs. Mine aren't wheat intolerant, so anything like the odd bit of stale bread, left over pasta etc gets thrown their way, not that there's much in my house!
     
    #1 Sleeping_Lion, Jun 3, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2010
    Muttly, fun4fido, Goldstar and 6 others like this.
  2. alaun

    alaun PetForums VIP

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    Fantastic post - really helpful. I've been experimenting with raw for the past year and it's nice to see exactly what others do.

    With the liver I put it in the microwave for a few minutes. It goes quite leathery but can be cut into small chunks and be used as a training aid.

    We use chicken carcasses and using the chicken shears we cut it into manageable sized peices as you have done with the ribs.

    Can't wait to go and make a big batch of veg now! :thumbup:
     
  3. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    The majority of bones and meat my two get are chicken carcasses, they come ready prepared as they're from a factory that strips the meat from the carcasses, and sell the wing tips and carcasses off cheaply. I get 15kg boxes for £2.50. I'm happy to edit and show the easy way to take apart a chicken if people would find that useful? I reserve the meaty parts for me to use, and the dogs get the boney parts (wing tips, breast bone and back).
     
  4. JSR

    JSR PetForums VIP

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    :thumbup: Fab post, think my lot will be de-camping to yours if they saw this!!!!! :lol:
     
  5. alaun

    alaun PetForums VIP

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    I've just been to the local butchers and asked what I could have for the dogs - he gave me an ox heart. :thumbup: I'm so glad that you have done this thread as I would have been nervous of dealing with a whole heart before.

    I have to say my 10 yro son can't wait to help me cut it up. A meal and science lesson all in one :thumbup:


    I would like to see how you deal with chicken carcasses - it will reasure me that I'm doing it right (or not as the case may be).
     
  6. Nicky10

    Nicky10 PetForums VIP

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    Great post. There could be a couple of other things fish, eggs stuff like that but good beginners guide that people can modify if need be
     
  7. HeyMeow

    HeyMeow PetForums Junior

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    Thank you very much for this post. I think my dogs would very much love to live with you :p They are both food crazy and after changing to raw feeding, I have seen a complete change in both health and happiness:D
     
  8. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    Added a 'menu' to cover that, it was just for the veggies and meat bit really, but I don't mind making it so that it covers everything I feed, and great to have input from anyone else as well :)

    I'll dismember a chicken and take pics to add when I get chance, it's really easy, most of the bones just pop out of the sockets.
     
  9. Ducky

    Ducky PetForums VIP

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    interesting post. i dont feed raw, but i might in the future. (my dad doesnt agree with it really, dont ask lol)

    out of interest though, why do you not include broccoli?
     
  10. Nicky10

    Nicky10 PetForums VIP

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    It is good for them but in high enough doses it's toxic. At least so google says Buster doesn't get vegetables
     
  11. sue&harvey

    sue&harvey PetForums VIP

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    Great post, really great info and gives an ides of portion mixes :thumbup:
     
  12. EmCHammer

    EmCHammer PetForums VIP

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    I would like to swap over one day but really struggle for time at the moment (not that that would stop me once decide to) but severly lacking in freezer space. Its a really interesting thread tho thank you.

    Seems like once you get going there is no looking back but I do have a couple of questions..

    1. What do people do if you have to go away, i.e. maybe every six weeks or so my dogs will go to my friends if away - suppose you can prepare packs.

    2. How long does it take you to swap over ? I do feed mine dry but sometimes come home with a nice treat from somewhere to mix in, bit of liver, blade of lamb (seems to have some ribs in it) which hack up, morrisons do some kind of lamb bones whilst not meaty they love, chicken wings, dollop of raw mincemeat etc. They love their raw veg too.

    One of mine is incredibly greedy tho, he can't have big marrowbones as he yams at them so much even after half an hour it seems to really make him want the loo alot but very constipated; in the past has had raw 'pet mince' pre packaged from pets at home and its gone straight thru him (not sure how processed it is?). He also will attempt to swallow anything meaty and will 'inhale' meaty bony bits (i.e. swallow with minimal chewing) sometimes and then bring them up again... or other times is sick in the morning and (sorry folks) i find bits of bone in it.

    So really just wondering how you can do it whilst avoiding tummy issues ??
     
    Team_Trouble likes this.
  13. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

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    For the broccolli question, it (apparently) can inhibit thryroid function, for a dog that has a problem, it can exacerbate this, otherwise it is fine in small doses, the same as onions really.

    For the other questions:

    1) I've done raw feeding when away, you can take chopped veggies, blend a portion fresh if you need to, and obviously buy chicken portions. I've also fed complete food for a couple of days where it's not really worth the hassle of carrying blender and chopped veg with me.

    2) it takes about a week to swap over, if you try your dog with raw chicken and find it's ok, then you can pretty much swap over completely within a week or two.

    Beef bones can be quite rich and make them loose, I always say chicken (or turkey) are the best introductory foods to raw, they are also the best nutritionally, having a wide range of vitamins and minerals, and also omega 3. They aren't dense, so won't wear teeth down quickly, and are easy to bash up so your dog can't swallow large bones whole. The main part of the diet for my two is tripe and chicken bones. They rarely, if ever, get beef bones, and I don't bother with pork, because I don't have a supplier that I can be sure it is free from internal parasites that may be passed on.

    If you're looking at swapping a dog over, you need to try them with chicken bones a few times. If they are ok, then you can pretty much swap over. You may struggle to get dogs that aren't used to blended veggies eating them without being mixed in with anything else, so mix something like yoghurt, or a spoonful of sardines in tomato sauce to make them more appetising.
     
  14. alaun

    alaun PetForums VIP

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    Could this be made into a sticky please - I've found it so useful already.
     
  15. ollie06

    ollie06 PetForums Newbie

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    This is brillant ive been raw feeding for over 2 years now but still learning all the time.:thumbup:
     
  16. Ridgielover

    Ridgielover PetForums Senior

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    Has anybody tried the Natural Instincts range of complete frozen barf diets? I looked at their website and visited them at Southern Counties show yesterday.
     
  17. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    Great thread sleeping lion.

    As you guys probably know, I dont feed veggie, but everything else is very similar in that I also feed whole pieces of meat (not ground) etc. It is interesting to see all the vitamins and minerals contained in each item of veg etc and what they all do! :) If I wasn't able to feed such a varied diet to maggie to ensure she gets all the nutrients, vitamins and minerals she needs with a meat, bones and offal diet, I would definitely be tempted to add veggie to help add the items she might be missing out on.

    ...I thought this might be useful to everyone re the nutritional breakdowns of different foods, especially meat & fish:

    I often use this US site to look up nutritional content of foods which is quite handy - you can search by specific raw food item and it provides a complete nutritional breakdown of vitamins/minerals etc: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

    I also have a list created from here with info on where you can find each of the following Nutrients/Vitamins/Minerals at a glance in common raw feeding items:
    Vitamin A (Retinol): chicken, pork, egg, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardines, liver, kidney, brain, tuna
    Vitamin B1 (Thiamin): liver, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Vitamin B3 (Niacin): rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine, tuna
    Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid): liver, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Vitamin B12 (cobalt/choline): liver, heart, kidney, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Vitamin C: liver, kidney, heart, fish
    Vitamin D: egg, sardine, liver, kidney, salmon, tuna
    Vitamin E: ostrich, buffalo, egg, halibut, haddock, sardine, kidney, liver, brain
    Vitamin K: egg, halibut, haddock, sardine, liver
    Calcium: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Chlorine: egg, salmon, tuna
    Copper: chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Iodine: salmon, haddock, seafood, egg
    Iron: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Magnesium: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Manganese: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, haddock, halibut, sardine
    Phosphorus: rabbit, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Potassium: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Selenium: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
    Zinc: rabbit, chicken, turkey, pork, lamb, goat, ostrich, buffalo, egg, beef, salmon, halibut, haddock, sardine
     
    #17 katiefranke, Jun 6, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  18. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    This is also quite a cool site with ideas for what to feed and pictures of each of the pieces - often with the preparation and/or the dogs eating it!!! :)

    Raw Fed Dogs

    And here is one with LOADS of great info on it around how to raw feed: http://rawlearning.com/

    Here is a nice little intro to switching to raw feeding: Switching to Raw

    And this is a nice little guide with some answers to some typical questions with info on how, when, where and what to feed etc: Practical Answers to Practical Questions About Raw
     
    #18 katiefranke, Jun 6, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  19. samsmummy

    samsmummy PetForums Newbie

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    Yes I use Natural Instinct and am their biggest fan. Their website Natural Instinct - High Quality Natural Dog Food is very good and they are so nice on the phone. My dogs have done fantastically on it. My lab is an old rescue who had lots of problems and I swear he's a different dog now. I would recommend it without hesitation.
     
  20. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    Great list Katiefranke - I use that nutritional dat lab site myself very frequently - such a great resource. The only shame from the point of cat owners is that they don't include taurine in their analyses.

    Re Vitamin E. While it is true that you can find levels of it in the meats you listed, the purest form is still found in germ oils, such as wheatgerm oil, and grass (it is the only plant oil I use for my cats' food but since this is about dogs I am not sure whether that is of any help...).
     
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