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Biting puppy

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Warhurs90, Aug 15, 2018.


  1. Warhurs90

    Warhurs90 PetForums Newbie

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    Wondering if anyone has any advice please.
    I have a 4 month old beagle puppy, whilst on a walk today he was biting at my OH feet, when my OH told him to sit and pointed with his finger puppy jumped up bit OH finger and drew blood, my OH was so shocked he stepped back wards and puppy then jumped again and clamped down on OH thigh biting through his trousers.
    Is this normal behaviour for this age as it seems abit vicious?! When he gets over excited he does the same and will snap at finger when told to sit, so we have started to say NO and walk out the room and return in about 1 minute to see if he has calmed down. Other than that he is a lovely dog and we love him to bits!
    Need advice as really concerned he will do this to a child or someone else.
     
  2. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    No it's not 'vicious' it's just what very many puppies do - bite....!!

    You have to remember your puppy spent several weeks honing his play biting skills with his brothers and sisters and he can't understand why you humans don't like his exciting bitey games. Most puppies love attention and pointing a finger was fair game in his eyes. The best thing to do is stand up and stand still, fold your arms and totally ignore the pup (stare at the wall or out of the window) because pointing fingers, saying 'no' etc is still giving him attention. When the pup has calmed down a quiet 'good boy' and giving him a treat would be a better plan.
     
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  3. danielled

    danielled Guest

    All puppies play the bitey bitey game. With Buddy I found shoving a toy in his mouth worked well.
     
  4. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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    I was just going to post something similar when I read this! My border collie pup is 8/9 weeks old. He’s very bright. I taught him to sit and lie down reliably in minutes. He’s great in the car. Settles in the boot with no jumping around or crying. Is fairly reliably toilet trained and sleeps well in his crate in my room with only one toilet break around 2am. His only issue is biting! I know he’s playing but it doesn’t half hurt! He’ll bite your ankles to death! I’ve tried redirecting him with a squeaky toy etc but once he’s decided he wants your ankles there’s no stopping him. I have to then pick him up and put him in his crate for ‘time out’. I pick him up firmly but not angrily and calmly shut him in for a minute or so. He just sits watching me. I let him out and he starts again!! When I pick him up to put him in his crate he’s like an eel on a line squirming and turning to bite me on the hands and arms! Has anyone got any ideas or tips? Thanks
     
  5. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Yes same advice as I gave above but in your case wear a sturdy pair of boots for the next few weeks.
    Be careful about using his crate for time out otherwise you might inadvertently teach him to hate going in there plus, being a smart collie, he could well start giving you the run around when you try to pick him up.
     
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  6. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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  7. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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    I did wonder that about time out in the crate. Where else would you suggest? Do you think time out is a solution? He has a mad 20 minutes or so running around and jumping on anybody’s/everybody’s ankles! I’ve noticed he’s worse when he’s tired. Very often when I put him in his crate he’ll settle down and sleep for half an hour or so. I suppose the time of year doesn’t help when everyone is wearing sandals!
     
  8. Warhurs90

    Warhurs90 PetForums Newbie

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    We had tried yelping when he bit, and leaving the room and coming back in when he had calmed down, neither worked.

    Since posting the original post I have tried standing up and firmly saying no with my arms crossed, if he tries to bite at my feet I take a step back but keep my stance and continue to firmly say no... shoes is a must at the moment ha ha! Obviously it’s not going to stop overnight as he is still a pup, but he has improved so going to carry on with this.
     
  9. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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  10. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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    That sounds sensible. I’ll give it a go. Thanks. My 90 year old dad lives with me and he wants to ‘clout it round the ear’ !!! He’s forbidden to smack or shout at the pup so I have to watch him like a hawk!! thanks for your tips. I’ll let you know how I get on
     
  11. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Yes they do have a mad 20 minutes and then crash out at that age as you rightly say. What about a Kong filled with something tasty? The good news is the puppy biting stage doesn't last very long (although it doesn't feel like it at the time).
     
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  12. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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  13. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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    Oh thank goodness for that! I tried to put his lead on this morning but he kept nibbling/biting my hands so each time he did it I stopped, stood upright, held the lead out of his reach and folded my arms and looked away. After the 3rd attempt he let me clip his lead on with no biting. Success! He’s already learnt what the lead means. I’m surprised what a quick learner he is! Thanks for your tips
     
  14. Warhurs90

    Warhurs90 PetForums Newbie

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    We let ours get his mad times out of his system it’s usually when he’s over tired and then he crashes afterwards and goes to sleep.
    We use toys to control his biting and jumping by throwing them in the garden/house and he tends to chase them instead.
    Once he’s got it all out his system he can rest, he curls up next to us and we move him into the crate.
    We have tried to steer away from using his crate for anything negative and touch wood he absolutely loves his, sleeps right through from 9pm until about 7am without a peep, we have to then wake him up to let him out to go the toilet!
     
  15. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Well done. Dogs hate to be ignored so immediately losing total interest in your pup is your best plan. Remember it's all too easy to teach bad habits. In fact it always seems much easier than teaching good and you are dealing with a clever collie.

    Btw a photo of your puppy would be nice.
     
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  16. Orla92

    Orla92 PetForums Junior

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    Your best bet, in my opinion is to completely ignore the behaviour. What he's looking for is some attention and it doesn't sound like he minds too much if it's good or bad!
    I also tend to use the word "Enough" if i absolutely have to. It seems to work better for me than "no" or the finger pointing!
    But just give completely ignoring him a go!
     
  17. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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  18. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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    I don’t feel I’m winning with my little one at the moment. He’s so good in so many ways but this snapping and biting is difficult. I’ve tried turning my back on him and standing still with my arms folded but he latches on to the hem of my jeans and won’t let go. He tries to ‘rag’ them. Sometimes he briefly releases his grip on my jeans only to grip my ankle! At this point I just have to remove him by lifting him up. He’s then snapping and biting my arms. I put him in his crate and he then settles down to sleep as if nothing’s happened! This evening he bit me that hard (not deliberately of course) on my calf that I got cross with him. I picked him up by the scruff of his neck, shook him (not roughly!) and shouted “no!”. Shame on me! I put him outside for a few minutes and shut the door so we could both calm down. I then let him back in and put him in his crate. He settled down and fell asleep! I set out to never shout or smack this little pup and I feel really bad now. I’m really struggling with this problem. I know it’s what pups do but crikey it’s SO annoying (and painful at times). I’ve tried redirecting him with toys etc. However, I do love the little sod!!!
     
  19. NannyMarg

    NannyMarg PetForums Junior

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    Well I found this guy on YouTube. He makes sense to me
     
  20. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Not a huge fan of him and hate the pointy finger but teaching a puppy to leave is certainly a good idea.
     
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