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Birds, Parrot, Cats

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Stelios, Feb 3, 2019.


  1. Stelios

    Stelios Banned

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    What cats do, as everyone knows but some prefer not to think about, is kill wild birds They have good reason to be nervous, because a predator lies in wait. It’s a great big black cat that we have spotted, on occasion, stalking the birds from the roof of the shed. This sends them into paroxysms of chirruping panic. Katherine shooed the cat away, but who knows whether it will come back while we’re out, to drag the poor chicks from their carefully constructed but worryingly vulnerable nest and kill them?

    I notice that often cat-lovers think of themselves as lovers of animals. But how? Do they wipe from their minds what their cats do when they’re prowling outside?

    millions every year, according to the RSPB.

    Here are these two birds bringing up their families in our garden, feeding their bleating chicks, and along comes the domestic cat, a ruthless hunter introduced by humans to mess up the natural order of things.

    “Belling the cat” (that is, hanging a bell around the animal’s neck, as in Aesop’s fable) ought to be the minimum cat owners do.

    At least that would warn birds of their presence. I would go further – cat owners should stop their pets reproducing indiscriminately. It would also be better if cats were kept indoors.

    If you own a cat, what it gets up to it is your responsibility. If your pet goes out and slaughters millions of birds and chicks, it is your business.Most cat-lovers presumably accept this, but do not mind what their pets do. They may think there are enough birds, or if they do have qualms then their love of their pet over-rides them. A friend told me yesterday with a shrug that she has no birds in her garden. Of course she doesn’t: she has a cat.

    Another told me how one day she had rejoiced to see that a wren had made its home outside her kitchen window – only for her cat to drop the tiny bird’s corpse through the cat flap.

    I imagine that to its owner the big black cat is a cuddly, adored companion; but to our children, seeing it menacing the fledglings, it is the enemy.

    They are fervently hoping that the long-tailed chicks in their house of bark and spiders’ webs will escape the attentions of Felix for long enough to fly away. Is there a way I can get rid of cats in my neighbourhood. Or eliminate them humanly some how to protect my garden birds. And I Love to let my parrots outside for a free flight, they are trained to come back and it would be safer for me to do that if I eliminate cats.
     
  2. huckybuck

    huckybuck Cat Chat Friend

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    You could cat proof your garden which is what some of us indoor cat owners do. There are methods that keep cats out as well as in such as rollers on the top of your fence.

    Have a look at the cat proof/cat run thread at the top of this page.

    Also I would ask you neighbour if they would mind keeping the cat in for a specific time each day - you could then let your parrots out with less worry during that time.

    Interestingly I have a cat run in the garden and have bird feeders extremely close to it - we get all sorts of birds that feed less than 2 foot from the run with the cats inside!!! They must somehow realise they are safe as they can see the cats there.
     
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  3. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Like Huckybuck says, I am one of those who has catproofed my garden to keep my cats in, and the birds do not land in my garden. Instead they fly over it and land on the bird feeders and water container I have hung up in the piece of woodland that I own below my garden. My cats cannot get at them. We have dozens of birds feeding on the feeders, and lots of squirrels in the woodland, also a live badger sett. Plenty of wildlife i.e.

    It is a bit early in the year right now for birds to be breeding in the UK. No point in them producing chicks if there are no flies or caterpillars etc to feed them on. And it is too cold at present for insects to be around. What type of birds are they in your garden?
     
    #3 chillminx, Feb 4, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
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  4. Stelios

    Stelios Banned

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    I was talking about last spring and summer... And thank you,I will cat proof my garden, but will ask my neighbour to pay for it. His cat using my garden as a KFC garden birds restaurant.
     
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  5. Anita1234

    Anita1234 PetForums Member

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    I understand your point of view , there is no need for domestic cats to go outdoors and kill innocent animals , it’s not for survival as they have food at home , and it’s not safe for cats also to roam outdoors freely , cat owners shouldn’t inflict their cats onto other animals that have the right to live too , their lives are as important , why you have to catproof your garden if it’s the neighbours cat , so everyone that lives near a free roaming cat should cat proof their Garden ?

    I have some adopted stray cats , luckily they are too lazy now to hunt when they can say meaow and dinner is served and I discourage any hunting behaviour ,
     
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  6. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Not all cat owners like the thought of the carnage their furry companions can and inflict on wildlife,I certainly don't.
    I have never had free roaming cats and never will ,I have a run with tunnel in the garden giving my lad the freedom to come and go as he pleases.
    It keeps both him and the wildlife safe and also stops him from being a nuisance to neighbours who may not appreciate him as much as I do .
     
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  7. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    I have two cats and I also love bird, wild or otherwise. There are ways to minimise the risks and, by the way, I would add that there are equally as many fledgings taken by other birds and mammals, the blame is not purely with cats. Catproofing your garden to stop other cats and animals like foxes is one way or keeping cats in pens. Birds visit our garden, which is catproofed, and, because we want to help wildlife, especially in winter, we put bird feeders up really high in our tree so they are not within reach of the cats. We do not have bird boxes in our garden for the very reason of deterring birds getting caught and killed by our cats. The birds do not always have to be from nests in your own garden, we occasionally get fledgings fly down from neighbouring gardens. We try not to let our cats out at the time birds are generally feeding either. I have had my cats for five years now and, in that time, they have only twice caught birds who were on the ground.

    I would be very unhappy to think you would consider eliminating cats when there are ways of minimising the chances of them catching birds or, if necessary, discouraging the birds from nesting in or on your property.
     
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  8. Stelios

    Stelios Banned

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    My wife and I are both avid bird lovers, and she is a bird photographer. We go to great lengths and expense to attract as many types and numbers of birds to our backyard as we can.

    We are quite successful in doing so, but our neighbor’s cat is also quite fond of them and is quite an avid hunter — murderer is more like it.


    I have asked our neighbor nicely to keep their cat out of our yard, but nothing has changed. We have a totally fenced yard; I have tried sprays and granules that are supposed to repel cats, and my wife and I both chase the cat out of the yard whenever we see it.


    This cat is on a mission to kill and is not afraid of us. It is well-fed and does not need our birds. Our question is, what is our right as homeowners? If the neighbor does not want to be respectful and keep the cat inside, what can we do? Can we trap it and take it in?


    I personally believed that parrots had to free fly, so I took my birds for a free flight every spring and summer. They fly around a house and land in our garden. My birds are trained and they always come back to me. That is another reason I would like to solve this cat problem even if I send a cat to lala land.
     
  9. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    There is no law controlling cats as there is dogs, they are deemed to be free roaming and, unfortunately, the fact you like encouraging birds into your garden makes it a very attractive prospect for the cat next door. Your neighbour does not legally have to do anything to restrict her cat's activities, the onus is on you to ensure cats cannot get into your garden. If you have just fencing that isn't enough to deter any cat, it needs proper cat proofing.

    No, you cannot trap it and take it in, this would be stealing and it would be an offence under the Animal Welfare Act to hurt, injure of worse any animal for which you could receive a prison sentence so I'd forget that.

    Hunting is in a cat's genes and psyche regardless of the fact we keep them as pets and feed them and some cats are more predatory than others.

    We have cats next door who we don't want in our garden upsetting our own cats and the catproofing does stop them. That is your best answer.

    Have a look at the section on here on catproofing your garden.
     
  10. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Stelios - I agree with Charity's excellent advice.

    Asking your neighbour "nicely" to keep their cat out of your garden is not the answer. How is the neighbour supposed to prevent their cat coming into your garden ? Cats are allowed by law to roam (whereas dogs are not) and not every cat owner wants to suddenly start keeping their cat indoors all the time.

    Your garden is a very attractive prospect to a cat. Cats have a very powerful hunting instinct and they do not hunt just to eat. If they are well fed at home, they may hunt less perhaps, or they may kill their prey but not eat it. That is simply the nature of the animal.

    If I wanted to make my garden a haven for birds I would fence it in with special cat proof fencing. That is the solution and the only way you will keep the cats out for sure. If you resent that suggestion and don't want to do it, then don't encourage the birds, or else live somewhere there are no roaming cats, e.g. an RSPB nature reserve perhaps. (they often need live-in wardens)

    It would be shocking and also against the law if you were to steal someone's cat, or harm one in any way. I hope as you have respect for other species you are just joking when you suggest such a horrible thing.
     
  11. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
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    I am sorry that you find your neighbour's cat a nuisance and a threat to the birds in your garden.
    As others have pointed out, cats are allowed to roam. You need to make your garden secure to protect the wild birds as well as your own.
    If you were to trap your neighbour's cat what would propose to do with it?
    Threatening to harm another animal will not be tolerated on this forum
     
  12. TriTri

    TriTri Standing up for cats

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    Sorry Charity, didn’t mean to press the reply button to you.
     
  13. TriTri

    TriTri Standing up for cats

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    Excellent replies ladies. I think a house move to La La land would be the best option. Have you ever been to a zoo? What do you think they feed the animals there? Other animals is the answer. We are animal lovers on here and I love all animals. As cat owners and cat lovers, we can’t and nor can our dearly beloved cats help, the way they were made. Many people are vegetarian, but vegetarians don’t sugggest sending non vegetarians to la la land. You need to be more understanding of the world we live in and try to see the good in cats. No animal and no person is perfect, are you?
     
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  14. Ringypie

    Ringypie PetForums VIP

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    I am slightly puzzled why you would come on a forum for cat lovers to have such a rant! Are you just trying to cause trouble?
     
  15. Stelios

    Stelios Banned

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    I will cat proof my garden this spring. Thanks for the advice. I would never injure cat -cat proofing my garden seems like the perfect option. Lala land was a joke ;-)
     
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  16. NFC slave

    NFC slave PetForums Senior

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    Glad you are not my neighbour, I would be terrified of parrots flying around the area. Why do you think your neighbour should pay for cat proofing your garden?
     
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  17. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    I am very surprised they're allowed free flight outdoors. A good friend is a bird breeder/exhibitor (also owns pet parrots) and only ever takes them outside on a special harness (who knew?!) and claims any owner who thinks their parrot knows not to fly off are deluding themselves.
     
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  18. Stelios

    Stelios Banned

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    Despite having an abundant negative backlash to free flying from many reputable parrot breeders and owners we pushed forward as we knew first hand that this was in the best interests of our birds physical and mental health.

    Although free flight is supported by science based research and the majority of the community unfortunately owners who free flying there birds still continue to receive negative repercussions from breeders and individuals.

    This has provided the perfect platform in educating, redirecting and providing relevant resources to clarify fact from fiction. We have identified the negative comments are simply coming from a place of ignorance, so continual education is key in changing the culture of avian ownership & understanding.

    Free flying is adamant on creating a standard expectation via accredited training and members abiding by the state laws.

    Despite the controversies, free flying parrots is legal owners & their birds can fly freely without negative legal consequence.
     
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  19. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    DUPLICATE POST
     
    #19 Cleo38, Feb 7, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2019
  20. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    Wow, that is amazing @Stelios !! I have very little knowledge of parrots & free flying but this looks like such a fantastic experience for birds that are kept in captivity. I attended a seminar with Susan Friedman last year & she was speaking about captive birds trained to fly at various theme parks & it was lovely to watch video clips of them.

    How many birds do you have & how do you train this?
     
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