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Bereavement in cats.

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by MrRustyRead, Feb 1, 2012.


  1. MrRustyRead

    MrRustyRead PetForums VIP

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    Midge isn't coping to well with the death of her sister mungo. How can I help him cope?
     
  2. $hAzZa

    $hAzZa Shan

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    'There are a number of things you can do to help a grieving cat to overcome the loss. Minimising change gives the cat time to come to terms with the loss of a companion cat. Keep the cat ' s routine the same. Changes in feeding times or even simply moving furniture around can cause further stress.

    A grieving cat may go off its food. A cat that goes off its food for several days is in danger of a potentially fatal liver disease called hepatic lipidosis. Encourage eating by warming food slightly or putting water or meat juice or it. Sit with your cat during meal times to provide reassurance. Don't be tempted to change diets to stimulate appetite as this may cause digestive upsets. If the cat does not eat for three days seek veterinary advice.

    Spend more time with the cat grooming, stroking and playing. This will give a positive feel to any changes in the house that the cat senses.

    Don't attempt to replace a lost cat immediately. While your remaining cat may be missing a long term companion, she is unlikely to welcome a stranger when she is still unsettled about the loss. A new cat at this time simply provides an extra source of stress.

    Like many species, time spent sniffing and nuzzling the dead body of their companion may be a necessary part of the grieving process. It can therefore be helpful to bring the body of a euthanased cat home rather than have it cremated at the vet's.

    Whenever dramatic changes in behaviour occur, the cat should always be checked by a vet for any underlying physical problem. Unresolved behavioural problems can be referred onto animal behaviourists'
    Feline bereavement

    Sorry to hear about Mungo:( RIP Mungo xxxx
     
  3. MrRustyRead

    MrRustyRead PetForums VIP

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    I've been having midge time when it's just about him. I wanted to show him the body but my family wouldn't let me.
     
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