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barking for attention

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Deb, Jun 16, 2010.


  1. Deb

    Deb PetForums Senior

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    my 18mth collie has changed over the last few weeks. In the evening she becomes like a different dog. She constantly jumps up on the sofa and chairs (have posted a thread on this already) and is constantly wanting attention. She brings us toys all the time and if we dont play with her she barks and barks. We have got to the stage where we hide the toys when we have had enough but she still barks for our attention. She gets enough exercise and interaction with us and was never a very vocal dog until recently. My neighbourhas a small child and i am on good terms with her parents which i dont want to change but she has already commented on cassie barking. Not sure what to do. Deb :confused1:
     
  2. RAINYBOW

    RAINYBOW PetForums VIP

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    My friend just went through this with a behaviourist and her dog.

    If she tried to stop anywhere when they were out he would just bark bark bark.

    We used to have coffee on our walks and he would just bark the whole time.

    She had to ignore him totally and not give him any attention until he stopped barking and relaxed for a minute then we could leave the cafe (because that was what he was barking for) in your case it would be play a game or a treat.

    It was tough at the start but did work very quickly in terms of timescale. It must be completely ignored though by everyone, zero acknowledgement until they are calm ;)
     
  3. Deb

    Deb PetForums Senior

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    will try it but it is difficult when she is jumping on the sofa as well because i dont want her on there!!:D
     
  4. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    If there is a sudden behaviour change a vet check up is first. Excessive barking can be indicative of all sorts of things.
    Dogs are also naturally crepuscular which includes activity in the evening.

    Here's a handout on excessive barking with some general reducing tips: http://petcentral.yolasite.com/resources/Excessive Barking.doc

    Here's a blog series on calming some exercises I think will be important for your teenager(!): Calming Your Cerrrrraaaazzzzzy Canine « pawsitive dogs

    Employ calmatives, crate and settle training, speak/shush training, jazz up and settle down, enrichment and games - details of all these are more are in the above links.
     
  5. Deb

    Deb PetForums Senior

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    think cassie is either the excited barker or attention seeking barker!!! Have already been to the vets for her anal glands and she was fit and healthy. Am going to try the ignoring suggestion and see if that helps (or just lots of kongs!!!). As far as i am aware she does not bark when left alone - only when we are there!! Deb
     
  6. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

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    What time does it start?

    Are the sofas near windows etc?

    Does she get fed before these bouts of barking?

    What do you feed her? Has this changed recently?

    What evening exercise does she get and how long after being back to the barking start?
     
  7. Deb

    Deb PetForums Senior

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    1. starts early evening 5-6ish
    2. yes sofa is near windows but she does not look out of them. she can go behind them to do that.
    3. she gets fed around 4-5ish
    4. she is on james wellbeloved and have not recently changed (quite a few months back now)
    5. depends on shifts etc so varies. - can be a couple of short walks or a longer walk (1-1 1/2hrs) but this does not apparently make any difference.
     
  8. Zirallan

    Zirallan PetForums Newbie

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    When I first met my husband his dog whined constantly. Non stop. The only time she wasn't whining was when my husband was asleep. It was incredibly annoying.. And every time she whined he would reach over and pet her or give her a treat or some such. This had been going on for 6 years.

    Once I got him to understand that if it didn't stop he wasn't going to live in the same house with me, it ended pretty easily. All we had to do was ignore her.. And ignore her.. And ignore her again. Took less than a week to stop the 6 year habit. Don't talk to her, don't look at her, just completely ignore her. She'll get it.
     
  9. PinkEars

    PinkEars PetForums VIP

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    Hi I have this issue too, just another one lol she will be quiet all day, asleep and then in the evening she will be really unsettled, wine and jump on the sofa's. I have tried the ignoring thing and to an extent it worked but my problem is she will stop wining but do something naughty like jump on the sofa, or jump up at the kitchen work top so i have to give her some sort of attention to stop her from doing that...any suggestions?
     
  10. aloevera

    aloevera PetForums Member

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    Have you tried teaching you dog to bark? It may sound stupid, but once you have control of them barking, you can then teach them to stop ?

    May sound mad, but it helped with my mutt :D

    Aloe.
     
  11. PoisonGirl

    PoisonGirl Banned

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    What exercises do you give her other than walks, if any?

    I would possibly use removing her method, I helped with a staff/collie with this problem a few years ago. The barking was a big problem as it started as soon as the young son was put to bed.
    So we left a houseline on him. As soon as the behaviour started, he was removed from the room and ignored completely. He stopped almost straigt away (after the first few times where he shouted and scratched the door for about 30secs)
    Then he was allowed back in and directed to his bed with a chew.
    The removing was repeated every time, but the chew was intermitent (incase he barked so he could be quiet and get a chew)

    I have not found that waiting to the dog stops then rewarding works with attention as well as removing because some dogs can learn that all they need to do to get a treat and more attention is to bark, whereas they hate being exluded.
     
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