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Barking at start of the walk

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Zarroe, Nov 20, 2020.


  1. Zarroe

    Zarroe PetForums Newbie

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    Hello,

    I kind of have 2 questions;
    1) how can I stop my dog barking, in an excitable way, at the start of a walk

    2) can my neighbour report me, as he suggested, for nuisance to the council when she does this for approx 1 minute at around 6.45 am and then in the evening around 5pm?

    I am training her not to do this, but obviously training takes time
     
  2. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    What kind of dog have you got, how old and how long have you had him/her?


    Are you driving to walking locations or do you mainly set off from your house?


    If starting off from your house, you can pop the lead on in your house and then just wait it out til your dog calms (practise at a time your neighbour is out!)

    Approach your door and then just repeatedly close it until your dog is sitting calmly beside you. Dont talk to your dog. He will soon work it out. Could be a good 15 - 20 mins first time.

    Then through the door and stop every time the barking starts again. Just stop in your tracks until your dog is calm.


    If you drive to a location you can do the same sort of thing if it all starts off when you open the door/boot. Just keep closing it til your dog is quiet.



    If it starts in eagerness when you are about to unclip the lead, have a handful of treats ready and fling them on the ground simultaneously with unclipping.

    That will stop your dog bombing off.


    Yes your neighbour can report you. One minute's barking at 5pm will be disregarded as that is acceptable hours and for a short period.


    The 6.45 is outside 'social hours' (noise needs kept low between 11pm to 7a.m)



    Are these time the times when you get your dog ready to go out?


    You could try flinging the treats down whilst you get the lead on and fix your dog's nose and mouth to a tube of primula cheese whilst you get away from your street if you need a quick emergency fix. Just hold an open tube of primula at your dog's mouth and away you go!
     
    LittleMow and Lurcherlad like this.
  3. LinznMilly

    LinznMilly Moderator
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    Hi. Welcome to the forum.

    1) Simply teach her that barking equals no walk. So she barks, and your shoes and coat come off, you sit down and do something else.

    2) To be fair, even with 2 dogs of my own, I wouldn't be happy with a dog barking and waking me up at that time in the morning, either -, especially not if it was every morning.

    You may find this useful;
    https://www.gov.uk/guidance/noise-n...ith-complaints#noise-at-night-warning-notices

    A dog's bark is well outside the permitted range;
    https://www.cuteness.com/blog/content/decibel-level-of-a-barking-dog
    https://www.reference.com/pets-animals/loud-dog-bark-567ba4b33ad69658

    So yes, technically, he could complain, but the council would give you time to put it right.
     
    #3 LinznMilly, Nov 20, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2020
    LittleMow, Lurcherlad and tabelmabel like this.
  4. Zarroe

    Zarroe PetForums Newbie

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    Hi thanks for the replies,

    she is a collie cross, and we have had her for 3 weeks. We she arrive she would bark before we even left the house but we have trained that out of her; it only for about 30 seconds as we walk to the main road and once we have crossed it usually stops.

    I’ve tried making her sit and using the quiet command, which work for a few seconds. But I guess I need to be a bit firmer and return to the house?
     
  5. kittih

    kittih PetForums VIP

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    I had this looking after a neighbours BC. What helped was to make sure every action I did myself was slow and calm. I tried to exude a relaxed almost bored nothing going on here body language.

    Then we practiced every single action that pre empted a walk at random times during the day. Lead clipped on and off, putting coat on, grabbing keys, moving towards door. All those steps practiced separately followed by sitting back down again and nothing happening until all those actions themselves were boring and didn't predict a walk.

    We then practiced the same going out the door. Any non calm behaviour was back inside or door shut. Repeat until it gets boring.

    Then practice again once outside. Non calm behaviour then back inside.

    My BC cottoned on pretty quickly. It helps to practice this when the neighbour is out so any barking doesn't cause you to get stressed.

    An explanation about how you are training this behaviour with a thank you for being understanding gift of some sort may help. Also perhaps starting the walk after 7am or bit later even if it is shorter for a while.

    In my experience walks and fun activities can generate lots of excitement and stress. Collies won't necessarily be tired from walks, after all they are bred to spend very active periods gathering in sheep etc. What is tiring is using their brains so a training session before a walk will help calm them before hand.

    We used to practice a lot of "tricks" when out walking too, especially things like hand nose touches, check ins, recall (even if on a lead, sits/downs etc and also lots of searches for scattered treats as anything using their nose is also tiring.

    What brain activities are you doing with your dog? Kikopups capturing calm video on YouTube may also be worth a look.
     
    LittleMow and tabelmabel like this.
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