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Bad news: new anti-B resistance gene found in cow's milk, transfer to microbes "likely"

Discussion in 'Wildlife Chat' started by leashedForLife, May 20, 2017.


  1. leashedForLife

    Joined:
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    .
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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170426123004.htm
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    This gene confers resistance to to
    all beta-lactam antibiotics including the most-recent generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
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    transfer of this gene to other microbes
    will ..."jeopardize the use of reserve antibiotics to treat human infections, caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in hospitals".
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  2. leashedForLife

    Joined:
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    fragile hope:
    adding another compound can "reinvigorate" antibiotics so that they work once more, at body-safe dosages.
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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121022162651.htm
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    2-aminoimidazole QUOTE, "works by short-circuiting the bacteria's ability to mount a defense against the antibiotic. When antibiotics interact with bacteria, receptors on the surface of bacteria identify the antibiotic as a threat, & the bacteria can then choose what to do to survive. MRSA either creates a biofilm or makes genetic changes, to prevent the antibiotic from disrupting its cell structure.
    Per Melander, 'We believe our compound renders the bacteria unable to recognize the antibiotic as a threat, essentially stopping the defensive process before it can begin.'
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    another possibility:
    membrane-busting compounds.
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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170315125558.htm
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    QUOTE,

    "... lysine-conjugated aliphatic norspermidine analogues (LANAs) have been effective at killing certain bacteria & the Ebola virus in lab tests. ... Konai & ... Haldar wanted to see if these compounds could also work against MRSA.

    The researchers found that LANAs effective against four MRSA strains in lab experiments. Testing on mice showed the compounds could eliminate MRSA skin infections, which form notoriously difficult-to-treat biofilms. Even after 20 passages, the MRSA bacteria failed to develop resistance to the compounds.
    The results suggest LANAs could be strong contenders for treating MRSA skin infections, the researchers say."
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