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Bad experiences with other dogs

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by edinoodle, Nov 24, 2021 at 10:31 AM.


  1. edinoodle

    edinoodle PetForums Member

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    Hi all,

    The devilish duo are both doing really well and being as cheeky as ever! But I was hoping to get your advice.

    Unfortunately Bumble has had a few interactions with dogs running over to him and invading his space which he isn’t happy about. On all occasions I’ve body blocked the oncoming dog but he isn’t a happy boy, he squeals and has his tail between his legs and runs in between my legs and so far I've been successful in stopping dogs from actually getting to him. We’ve been doing our absolute best to avoid these interactions to build up his confidence, and over the weekend he had some nice interactions with well behaved dogs in his own time which was lovely to see. However this morning we’ve had another set back where a dog on the opposite side of the road was straining to get to both Bramble and Bumble, and somehow got out of his harness and ran across the road.

    I’m just wondering what the best course of action is? He will mostly ignore dogs who don’t come up to him, but I think having a few dogs charge up to him has made him worried about approaching dogs.

    Here’s a couple of pictures, he’s almost the same size as Bramble already which is terrifying! He’s growing up quick!

    IMG_2859.JPEG IMG_2860.jpeg
     
  2. golfchick

    golfchick PetForums Senior

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    I didn't want to read and go but can't really offer any advice on how to avoid what are 'generally speaking' poorly owned dogs (I know often we have reactive dogs because of negative experiences they've had with other dogs but it started with the same reason). Definitely want to sympathise though with the annoyance of other owners ruining all of your hard work. Ziva being a large breed often got grief from other dogs and she eventually would simply walk into the undergrowth and thorns to avoid dogs which meant she ended up with cuts all over the place just to avoid the unknown. The classic was a small jack russell snapping at her and clearly not happy and the owners apologising with a 'sorry he's got small dog syndrome' to which my reply was 'yeah mines got well behaved dog syndrome'. Then we had a GSD who ran up to her and grabbed her on her back causing two massive puncture wounds despite the fact she was next to me and didn't approach them at all. Just when you think you've cracked it some other owner and their dog will come along and ruin it again, we can all remember the bad experiences more than the good.
     
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  3. edinoodle

    edinoodle PetForums Member

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    Thank you! I'm sorry to hear you had such bad experiences with Ziva. I can't imagine how it must feel when your dog is hurt by a strangers dog! I do think small dogs seem to be able to get away with it, all the experiences I've had have been with small dogs with poor recall and owners who seem to think it's my dogs job to tell their dog off. With Bram it's never been too bad because the hardest part about it is reducing her arousal and getting her to focus on me again so I never minded too much, but with Bumble he is scared and its hard to see. I'm not sure whether it's best to expose him to these situations but redirect him and help his reaction improve or whether to avoid them and other dogs altogether. Like you said, there will always be another owner with another dog so I want him to get used to it but without causing him to be reactive.
     
  4. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Continue doing exactly what you're doing. Let Bumble go between your legs to his 'safe' spot and protect him. The more you practice stepping in and keeping him safe, the more he will trust that you will do exactly that, and that will in turn boost his confidence.
    Just make sure you are staying calm and not giving off scared/worried vibes. Easier said than done, I know, but if you can practice your own behavior and what you will say to the dog owner, it can help keep your emotions manageable too.

    You may want to start carrying a walking stick or an umbrella that pops open. Make sure your own two are completely comfortable with the umbrella popping open and then use that as a shield with approaching dogs.
    You can even practice with the dogs at home, practice putting Bumble between your legs, make it happy happy, fun fun, pop open the umbrella, yay party!! That way it won't always signal scary dog approaching.
     
  5. edinoodle

    edinoodle PetForums Member

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    Great thank you, I like the umbrella idea a lot. I will practice that at home and make it a fun event, it'll help with blocking the dog because as much as I try some dogs can be very persistant and he just reverses backwards to get away. Would it be a good idea to go to parks with lots of dogs, finding a quiet area and letting him just watch to get him more comfortable with dogs moving in a space around him. It seems to them moving that bothers him and I'm wondering if he can get used to dogs moving past him if that will help him be a bit more confident? He's such a confident puppy in every other circumstance so it's sad to see him worried.
     
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  6. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    These sensible suggestions are all good. In addition, I find yelling ”mine has terrible fleas!” helps focus the other owner on getting precious fluffy back
     
  7. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    It could be a good idea... It could also be a bad idea LOL :D

    I'm actually a big fan of going somewhere and just hanging out. I do that with Penny a lot. But you have to really watch your dog and make sure they're relaxing and calming down, not getting more and more amped up.
     
  8. edinoodle

    edinoodle PetForums Member

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    Haha, I love it! :D

    That's exactly my dilemma! We do hang out on walks by stopping at benches and chilling, and both dogs are walked seperately too but since the an incident a few days ago I haven't done it with Bumble and am a bit unsure how to go about it. I think I'll see how he is on his walk later and see, writing it down has made me realise how much I've been worrying about it
     
  9. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    sorry to hear this. have this problem myself. If I have a dog running up in that circumstances I pick my little chi Libby up . A) it keeps her safe and B) it makes her feel safe.
     
    #9 kimthecat, Nov 24, 2021 at 3:07 PM
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2021 at 3:36 PM
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  10. Leanne77

    Leanne77 PetForums VIP

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    Unfortunately, no matter how hard you try to avoid putting your dog in situations where others run over, it's inevitably going to happen. Yes, it's immensely annoying and shouldn't happen but alas it does, way too often.

    All you can do is be proactive in protecting your dog. I became expert in mere avoidance techniques, I'd change direction as soon as I saw another dog, or heard somebody yelling, often without ever being seen. Invading dogs got blocked then taken by the collar and frog marched back to their owner, or they got my walking stick waving in their face. It does help though to have obedient dogs of your own. I was able to put all 3 in a sit and wait whilst I dealt with things.

    You will soon become skilled at dealing with space invaders. I've been in some pretty sticky situations with mine, with dogs who really weren't that friendly but I've always managed to protect them always. Dogs get to trust that you'll deal with it for them.

    Mine weren't scared, quite the opposite. They'd stand their ground and face any dog that came running over, even if they were twice their size and had teeth bared. But having dogs that will stand up for themselves can be more problematic than having a dog with less confidence. Many times I've had to diffuse a potential set to by stepping between tense dogs. I'd rather myself get bitten.
     
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  11. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Nice. Very nice.
     
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  12. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    How true is that. :( It seems that many dog owners with FA dogs end up managing their dogs , I feel I do myself.
     
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  13. edinoodle

    edinoodle PetForums Member

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    Thanks everyone for their replies.

    I think I need to get better at predicting it because I've naively assumed if a dog is off lead then the owner can recall which clearly isn't the case (also not a dig, Bramble doesn't have perfect recall and is always on a long line if there will be other dogs). Now I've thought about it more I can't believe the dog this morning crossed the road to get to us, it could have ended very badly!

    Going forward I'm going to be more aware of other dogs in general and try and treat Bumble as they're passing so he associates it with a good thing rather than the panic he currently does. I wish I could pick him up but he's too big. He is really scared by these approaching dogs though so I'm going to work on that with him and slowly build his confidence and just hope that no loose dogs run up to us in the meantime, although I will be ready to block them.
     
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  14. catz4m8z

    catz4m8z PetForums VIP

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    Its all subjective really isnt it?;) As the owner of small dogs who would never approach another dog unwanted Ive found big rude dogs to be the worst. Nothing worse then trying to protect your dog as its trying to escape a large dog chasing it (in Heidi's case sometimes screaming and wetting herself) only to be told that 'they are only playing' and to let them get on with it.:mad: I think that says more about the owner then the dog though.



    Oddly enough one of my worst experiences was because of this! A standard poodle with no manners was happily running after Heidi (poor Heidi again!LOL) who was terrified and I couldnt keep this dog blocked. I tried to use my umbrella to kind of herd it away and the young guy who owned it actually threatened to beat me up for trying to 'hit' his dog!:rolleyes: I really thought I was going to get punched that day!


    I think the best thing you can do is try and work on building up positive experiences though. That way they gain confidence and learn proper manners from well behaved dogs to. When my lot were younger I managed to find a time that alot of other people with polite dogs were walking and kinda glommed on to them!:Shy They were a nice bunch of people and really fun dogs. The dog in unofficial charge of the group was a husky who was awesome at keeping the younger more excitable dogs under control (not because the owners were ignoring it, he just had very high standards of what polite behaviour meant!LOL).:cool:




    Also your dogs?? Adorable! :Woot
     
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  15. edinoodle

    edinoodle PetForums Member

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    Oh yeah, absolutely. I think I was just riled up by the terrier this morning ;) no offence meant to small dogs and/or their owners! Thank you for the comment about building up good experiences, finding a group like that sounds ideal, although would be too overwhelming for him now I suspect!
     
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  16. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    The umbrella works brilliantly I found with Jack.

    It acts as a visual barrier and you can pretty much protect him 360 degrees.

    With dogs I would encounter regularly, I did explain calmly how dogs running at him was upsetting for him and hope they would be more considerate going forward.

    For the most part that did work. For the few arseh*les who couldn’t or wouldn’t control their dogs …. I had to be increasingly firm and insistent.

    A golf umbrella or hiking stick being waved at their precious pooch can galvanise an owner to exercise more control ;)
     
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