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article on cats and diabetes

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Linda2147, Oct 11, 2013.


  1. Linda2147

    Linda2147 PetForums Senior

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  2. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    A very good article....short and to the point!
    It does highlight how far ahead the US is in terms of treatment for FD compared to the UK where vets still try and push diabetic dry food on clients....after pushing various other formulas of dry food which probably formed the root cause of the diabetes in the first place!
     
  3. Elizabeth and Bertie

    Elizabeth and Bertie PetForums Member

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    Hi,

    Just over six and a half years ago I was launched into the whole 'feline diabetes thing' when my 8yr old boy, Bertie (then eating Science Plan diet dry food) was diagnosed with diabetes. After a short but immensely steep learning curve 'feline diabetes' became - and continues to be - a big part of my life.

    I absolutely agree with Paddypaws that this is a good (and succinct) article. And a couple of points from it really jumped out at me.
    Here are two quotes from the article; firstly: "The second essential component of treatment is the cat’s diet. For the best chance of curing diabetes, most cats should eat a canned diet formulated for diabetes, or a canned kitten food."

    OK... A couple of comments on that...

    As far as I know (and I am only a very ordinary lay person with a diabetic cat and with 6.5 years of 'home blood-testing' my cat and with assisting others with their diabetic cats), diabetes cannot be 'cured' per se. Factors involved in diabetes such as 'glucose toxicity' (which involve the reduced ability of the cat's body to assimilate and process insulin) seem to render real 'cure' a very rare possibility). However, if diagnosed in time and given the right treatment many cats can go into diabetic remission. 'Remission' essentially means that the diabetes can be diet-controlled.

    Folks who have diabetic cats AND who test their cats' blood glucose at home (and so have a detailed insight into their cats' blood glucose levels) have found that a wet diet (canned or raw) that has less than 10% calories from carbs is the most helpful. There are many foods on the market that meet this brief. It ain't difficult to do. And people's experience over many years is that there is no need to buy a specially formulated food for diabetic cats. Honestly.

    And secondly... "Be sure to consult with your veterinarian regarding the best diet for your own cat." Well, as PP said, the advice that vets in the UK often give seems not to be quite up to speed with advice given by some vets in other countries, such as the US. When my cat was diagnosed with diabetes the initial advice I had from the diagnosing vet was that I should have him 'put to sleep' (Huh???). When I said I wasn't prepared to do that she shrugged and said that I'd have to feed him a specific veterinary diet for diabetics, twice a day... I said I wasn't keen on that idea either.... Anyway, long story short, I got another vet!

    As I said earlier, I am only a lay person who happened on this whole feline diabetes malarky because one of my cats received an FD diagnosis. If you have (or even suspect that you have) a diabetic cat then please, please, please search for online info and advice about this situation. There is a vast amount of info, experience and support out there on the 'interweb'. You are not alone....:)
     
  4. Ianthi

    Ianthi PetForums VIP

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    Isn't this the case with a lot of other conditions as well, though? US are way ahead in terms of treatments where many are concerned.

    No need to apologise for being a mere layperson. Quite often owners who've researched their cat's condition frequently turn out to know more, possess more in depth knowledge, than the vet they're consulting!
     
  5. Aeschylus

    Aeschylus PetForums Member

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    Interesting, though not perhaps surprising, that the best advice on Feline Diabetes appears to reflect recent developments in thinking about human diabetes. For some (especially overweight Type 2) diabetic people, a low carb diet can make a very significant difference. Since cats are obligate carnivores, it makes sense that an appropriate diet for FD would contain no more than a trace quantity of carbs. The idea of dry (carb-laden) diets for FD is frankly astonishing.
     
  6. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    Astonishing yes, but still the advice that most people are given by vets. We have a new member on my diabetic forum who asked her vet what the difference was between wet and dry foods...and was told 'nothing apart from the water content' :confused:
    The dry food in question which the vet was flogging contains around 35% carbs, compared to around 5% for a wet food like Bozita.
    Diabetic Cat Care
     
  7. Psygon

    Psygon Yoshi Tonks! :-)

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    have to say this is exactly what happened when one of ours was diagnosed with diabetes. They never once recommended a tinned food to us. It was only because we went away and researched that we realised the dry food they had prescribed us was not going to do any good for Spoon. We switched her diet and she went into remission.
     
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