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Anne two black and white boys and a Nortie Tortie
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My friend's Springer had a nail infection a while ago which cleared up but appeared to have come back.

She was treated with ABs but infection seemed to increase and also foot looked swollen.

She was x rayed today and the result is an infection in the bone on one toe plus arthritis in the middle joint of two toes, one of which is the infected one.

She's only 5 and a typical very active Springer but has already had a cruciate repair on one hind leg and may well need the other one done in future.

Treatment at the moment is 6 week course of ABs plus painkiller and restricted exercise.

Has any one experience of this in a dog? Looking for advice on supplements which might help and any other info

TIA
 

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My friend's Springer had a nail infection a while ago which cleared up but appeared to have come back.

She was treated with ABs but infection seemed to increase and also foot looked swollen.

She was x rayed today and the result is an infection in the bone on one toe plus arthritis in the middle joint of two toes, one of which is the infected one.

She's only 5 and a typical very active Springer but has already had a cruciate repair on one hind leg and may well need the other one done in future.

Treatment at the moment is 6 week course of ABs plus painkiller and restricted exercise.

Has any one experience of this in a dog? Looking for advice on supplements which might help and any other info

TIA
Dont know the full details so hard to say, but at a guess I would think that what started as a nail infection, has gone into the nail bed and as it wasnt completely cleared up its now gone into the bone of the toe itself. Just wondering if the original anitbiotics were either the wrong sort (different antibiotics act on different bacteria) or there wasnt a long enough course in the first place or a mixture of the two. Has the vet done any samples and cultures to find out exactly what the infection is in the first place to make sure she is on the right antibiotics now. I think you can actually get fungal infections in the nails and nail beds and that can go to the bone too.

As far as the arthritis goes, there are certainly supplements that can help.
Ive got one of mine on Mobile bones at the moment and I have had good results. If you want to have a look at those

Dogs Joint Supplement | Glucosamine for Dogs | Mobile Bones | Pooch and Mutt

There is several veterinary type supplements too that you can get from the vet but tend to be cheaper on line and you can buy them without prescription.

There is Seraquin which containfs glucosamine, chondroitin and tumeric extract that increases mobility of dogs suffering from arthritis and degenerative joint disease.

There is also Arthri Aid high strength glucosamine chondroitin and MSM to help with painful joints/mobility and arthritis

Cortavet which is concentrated Glucosamine, MSM and chondroitin

One place you can get the ones above is Online Vet | Get Cheap Pet Medicine and Treatments Online From Vet-Medic - Vet-Medic but there are other places.

There is also these which can be obtained from the Natural Medicines centre.
I know Richard Allport often reccomends the Cortavet quite a lot and its on the list for arthritis
arthritis/joint problems

Animate: a powder containing a natural source of Chrondroitin with Vitamin C especially useful in the early stages of arthritis.

Can B: a supplement containing minerals and vitamins (especially Boron) which help to strengthen bones and joints

Cortavet: a supplement containing Chondroitin, Glucosamine Hyaluronic acid and MSM, chondroprotective agents which promote cartilage formation and joint lubrication.

Magnopulse magnetic collar: the magnetic field of this collar stimulates blood flow to diseased tissue and has an anti inflammatory and pain killing effect.

Yarrow: a combination of herbs that have traditionally been used to relieve inflammation and stiffness of joints.

Animal Magic Vitamin C & Royal Jelly: helps strengthen weakened bones and joints.

Arthotabs: a supplement containing green lipped mussel and other nutrients that nourish diseased joints and help relieve symptoms of arthritis.

Cartamine: a Glucosamine based supplement that helps repair damaged cartilage in arthritic joints.

Cod Liver Oil: a fish oil supplement proven to improve joint mobility.

Glycovetriflex: a supplement containing green lipped mussel and other natural remedies that improve strength and flexibility of arthritic joints.

Dr Reckeweg R 73: a homoeopathic combination for arthritis, especially of the back, shoulders, hips and knees

Full link
http://www.naturalmedicinecentre.co.uk/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1
 

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I just remembered that university of pennsylvania vet school puts reading matter on line for veterinary students, there is a small animal orthopedics manual that I was using when my dog had problems. There is a section on bone infections that might be some help. its a bit techinical and hard going though.

http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/saortho/chapter_37/37mast.htm

Whilst looking for the Uni Penn Stuff I found this too that is more at a glance and easier going.
Bone Infection in Dogs | petMD
 

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Here are some ideas about supplements for this condition ie specific ingredients rather than product and some considerations to think about when choosing.

Bromelain – naturally occurring enzyme sourced from the pineapple plant. It is predominantly found in the stem. Standardized extract is available alone or in combination with other products. It contains numerous anti-inflammatory chemicals and reduces the inflammatory response by alleviating pressure within the joint and allowing a greater ROM (range of movement).

Cetyl-Myristoleate – extracted from the Kombo nut, found in the commercial product Cetyl – M

Chondroitin - chondroitin sulphate is an important component of cartilage and the marine form is considered more bio available and powerful than the bovine form

Cod Liver Oil - contains around three times less Omega 3 EFA (essential fatty acids) than that of FBO. Also, as CLO contains a significant amount of Vitamins A and D pregnant bitches should not be given this supplement; if a dog is being fed a commercial diet, you should check that recommended doses are not being exceeded as of course these contain Vitamins A and D. Raw fed dogs will normally have sufficient of these vitamins via liver and bones.

Devils Claw - is a traditional herbal product, known as wood spider, a plant native to South Africa and traditionally taken as tea. The main anti-inflammatory agent is harpagoside which helps prevent the conversion of arachidonic acid into pro inflammatory messengers

Fish Body Oil - is extracted from the flesh of oily fish such as salmon, herrings, sardines, pilchards and mackerel. They are a rich source of EPA and DHA (always ensure that the quantities of both are identified on the labels of FBO).

Flaxseed Oil - (Linseed Oil) is ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) which the dog has to convert to EPA and DHA, thus it is not such an efficient or effective source of Omega 3 as FBO from either the point of bio-availability or cost.
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Ginger Extract – another traditional product which contains anti inflammatory properties

Glucosamine – is an amino sugar which is one of the main building blocks of cartilage; the HCl form is purer than the 2KCl form

Green Lipped Mussel – contains glycosaminoglycans

Hyaluronic Acid – aids joint lubrication and shock absorption

MSM - provides a source of sulphur molecules required for the formation of connective tissue

Rosehip extract – contain antioxidants such as Vitamin C both of which may have an anti inflammatory action.

Turmeric – contains curcumin, better to take a supplement which contains standardised extract than just the off the shelf powdered spice.

Vitamin C – essential in the formation of collagen

Vitamin E – if you give FBO then you should also supplement with this vitamin as the former depletes the body of the latter.
 
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