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Are dogs carnivores or omnivores?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Hollys, Dec 4, 2013.


  1. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    I have been told that dogs will eat horse/cow poop, because the diet of those two animals is practically all fibre and a dog's instinct tells it fibre is good.

    I don't know whether it's correct or not.
     
  2. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    From my notes apparently its believed dogs will eat poo if their deficient in vitamin B. No ones officially sure why dogs eat poo I reckon personally they just like the taste :>
     
  3. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    Their still carnivores all though they will scavange and they are opertunists. They can tolorate other foods in their diet but that doesn't other types of food like veg for example should form a stape part of it as thats wrong.

    Their is no harm in giving your dog a few table scraps. At the end of the day low qualitiy complete foods like pedigree chum and bakers may mean some dogs thrive on them but it doesn't mean its good for them we only see the dog on the outside.
     
  4. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    So? I did not say dogs were omnivores. I said they may have started down the evolutionary road towards it, so there's no reason to think dogs' teeth would be anything like those of humans.

    And dogs do have enzymes for breaking down starch. Read the link. They have far fewer of these enzymes than humans, but more than wolves.
     
  5. Julesky

    Julesky PetForums VIP

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    African ungulates will undergo physiological changes that enable them to not only ingest but digest their own afterbirth etc. as an anti-predatory response,but I doubt any of us would disagree they are herbivorous in nature.

    Dogs are not wolves.

    Wolves are predatory carnivores.

    Dogs have the weaponry of a predator teeth wise, but behaviourally scavenge.

    Whomever said they maybe just like the taste of cow poop is probably wrong- nothing happens on the widespread/common scale in the natural world for no good reason- there will be some dietary reason or such for this, I believe.

    Also I try my best to always keep my mind open when reading scientific 'fact'. Be critical in their methods and the peer reviewing- if it's not peer reviewed I wouldn't believe a word of it (also check the sponsors ;)- )
     
  6. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    Interesting read however startch can cause itching so such foods should feature to high on a dogs menue :>
     
  7. Goblin

    Goblin PetForums VIP

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    The reason cats are considered obligate carnivores is their requirement for taurine in the diet. Has nothing to do with carotene. Dogs can manufacture their own taurine although in some cases it has been shown not well enough.

    I'll ignore studies which show the possibility of β-carotene actually having co-carcinogenic properties as this was in humans, a species more adapted to process vegetables. If I give any of our dogs a raw carrot, I can guarantee I'll see it chunks come out at the other end. Just as I've sometimes had to pull grass out of the backside of a dog. You have to process vegetation to have a dog be able to extract meaningful amounts of nutrients. If you have to process a food type for an animal it's not "natural". The study mentioned in your link didn't feed raw carrots to see the effect did they? Next time I see a dog using a blender or oven so they can process their own vegetation, I'll agree with you.

    Antioxidents is really a discussion for elsewhere. It's frequently used to push the multi million supplement industry and elsewhere for marketing. One of the groups most likely to support the idea is the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the states. They have stated
    For or against antioxidents, I don't really know as it's not a subject I've looked at in detail. I know at least one study which shows supplementation can actually increase mortality. Species appropriate based on anatomy I can go with though.

    Question therefore is.. if you feed raw vegetables, do you process them first?
     
    #47 Goblin, Dec 4, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
  8. Goblin

    Goblin PetForums VIP

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    Peer review means little at the end of the day.
     
  9. Julesky

    Julesky PetForums VIP

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    How so? Surely it mean more than zero review?

    Peer review is done anonymously
     
  10. Goblin

    Goblin PetForums VIP

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    Are you saying because something hasn't been reviewed it can't be correct?

    The fact the review is anonymous can lead to potential issues as you can't check sponsorship and there's no responsibility.

    Drummond Rennie, deputy editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association

    Richard Horton, editor-in-chief of The Lancet

    At the end of the day you have to find the true sources of information and check the methodology where you can. Peer review is certainly not a guarantee that it's correct.
     
  11. Julesky

    Julesky PetForums VIP

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    Of course not- but it's better to have people skilled in the field looking through methodologies and questioning claims/findings...

    Of course you don't know their own leanings and so it is always best to scrutinise things yourself where possible... but I doubt i'd even bother with a study that hasn't been subject to some form of professional scrutiny- which in today's world all we have is peer review and our own understanding of statistics, methods and the subject matter.

    "true sources of information" mean you'd have t run experiments yourself- which you are unable to do, hence people skilled in experimental design can read the flaws of research and scrutinise the bias in reportings of findings.

    Science, like every other thing should be executed with integrity, ethics and morality- everything is subject to corruption- especially self regulation, but i'd rather invest in a cancer drug that experiments and the subsequent write up have been scrutinised by experts in the field than one that has been conferred zero scrutiny.

    It's the only real system at the moment.
     
  12. Julesky

    Julesky PetForums VIP

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    p.s


    in terms of guarantee of correctness- the beauty of research is that we are constantly increasing and building upon our knowledge- nothing is 'correct'
     
  13. Snoringbear

    Snoringbear PetForums VIP

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    Your going round in circles and contradicting yourself which is confusing.

    First you state digs are obligate carnivores

    Then cite a snippet from the Encylopedia Britannica stating its a definition of an obligate carnivore, which I then post in full. your bit is in bold.
    Although I'm aware of the Taurine thing, you the go on to say source you previously cited as a definition of an obligate carnivore as being wrong. You then double back saying cats are obligate carnivores because they can't produce Taurine, while dogs can, meaning dogs can not be obligate carnivores by your own definition.

     
  14. Goblin

    Goblin PetForums VIP

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    Maybe if you think about the words "more towards" not "are" you'll notice something ;)

    Why focus on taurine? I stated
    Just for information B-Carotene can serve as a "precursor" to vitamin-A in dogs but not cats. Something I didn't know previously as B-Carotene isn't an essential part of a diet and neither dog nor cat can synthesize it. Taurine is however essential, found only in meat and I believe in some seaweeds. It plays a part in why cats are classified as obligate carnivores and it's the one normally discussed which is why I focused on it.

    You say falculative carnivore, I say hypercarnivore. It's a matter of approach. Your initial link, to me, pushes vegetation as necessary (I've read it previously a few times) without any real reasoning. I still maintain dogs can thrive without vegetation as they are designed anatomically to do. The cancer "proof" listed I found to be poorly done. I suppose no dog eating a BARF diet suffered from cancer.

    So given that, when giving raw vegetables: do you process them?
     
  15. Snoringbear

    Snoringbear PetForums VIP

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    It's one or the other, but nice back-pedalling all the same.

    You haven't commented in the Encyclopedia Britannica reference. You used a snippet stating it was the correct definition for an obligate carnivore, yet when I post the whole quote you state that reference is completely wrong. Why's that?

    Never said that dogs needed to eat veg, a facultative carnivore doesn't need to.

    Mine have origin, I rarely give veg unless it's leftover, however it's cooked rather than throw it.
     
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