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Aggressive?

Discussion in 'Snakes' started by Kiro, May 1, 2018.


  1. Kiro

    Kiro PetForums Newbie

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    So I have two corn snake (Male and Female) They live in the same tank and have since they were hatchlings. Recently while cleaning their cage I noticed a strange patch of what looked like blood. While playing with the female I noticed a cou[le strange reddish dots.
    Both of them are very docile and behave well with me, I'm wondering if they're hurting each other or what might be happening.
     
  2. Teddy-dog

    Teddy-dog PetForums VIP

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    No one can tell you for sure. They could well have attacked each other over resources or perhaps something else. Tbh cohabiting is always a risk and it takes skil to do it successfully. It’s not something I would attempt.

    Is one larger than the other? Are you prepared to handle eggs when they lay? Keeping a male and female together will most likely result in the mating.

    I would separate them if I’m being honest. It will take away the risk of them hurting each other and if there is something going on with one of them, then you can isolate it to the one snake.
     
  3. dingal2000

    dingal2000 PetForums VIP

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    There could be a number of things, as the above party said they could be attacking each other , or stress is leading the female to attack itself, my advice would be to separate them
     
  4. Charlingo

    Charlingo PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry if this is an unwanted opinion but I would never keep corn together, most reptiles will happily live alone and will also always flight when housed with others and corn snakes are the same. I have a small reptile rescue and I have taken in so many animals that have been housed together. Personally I do see the point in housing them together as there are no benefits other then to the owner (as one need one of everything) but having animals separate will give them more freedom than being together. I would suggest separating them as even if it's unclear if they have attacked eat other or not I wouldn't risk it as the next fight could be deadly xxxx
     
    dingal2000 likes this.
  5. leashedForLife

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    .

    OP, do U feed live prey?

    Hopefully, U feed dead / frozen / thawed prey, which are warmed B4 offering. LIVE PREY are very dangerous in the confines of a cage or tank, the predator can strike, miss, & have a concussion, break teeth, break their jaw, etc, when they miss the prey-target, & hit a WALL, a sunbathing rock, a hunk of cage-furniture, etc. :eek: Ow.
    Also, live prey who are not immediately eaten will often turn & gnaw their predator - rodents are especially notorious, but in high-school we had a beautiful garter snake come in with a minor injury; we had very little cage-space, & some eejit put a large adult praying mantis in with the 15 to 18-in long snake.

    Overnite, the mantis chewed multiple nickel to quarter sized holes in the snake, from 1/16th to 1/8th inch deep - craters, 4 to 6 of them, all down his body, all dorsal.
    He had to be euthanized. :(

    - terry

    .
     
  6. Kiro

    Kiro PetForums Newbie

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    I feed frozen, I do thaw them first and warm them up before feeding
     
  7. cat001

    cat001 PetForums VIP

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    This is a little odd. Snakes by nature are non-territorial so not usually aggressive towards one another, they don't need to defend territories to protect resources except at breeding season when a very important limited resource becomes available - females and the opportunity to pass on their genes. Even then conflicts are usually resolved in wrestling matches between males, not typically biting. It's possible it could be biting from courtship with the time of the bite being in breeding season (sometimes corns may gently bite but not with the aim of causing injury) or possibly because part of one snake was accidentally scented with a mouse, causing the others feeding response to take effect and bite.

    As a side note that might be interesting to some, corn snakes seem to be semi-social and even produce specific chemical signals to alert other corn snakes of good shelter sites to aggregate together. But I think social housing should be done in a large enclosure with many hiding opportunities if done at all. There are certainly benefits to individual housing but I'm not completely against the idea of social housing if it's approached correctly.
     
    #7 cat001, Jul 11, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
    Kiro likes this.
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