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Aggressive jrt towards its owners

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Michsean7485, Jan 13, 2021.


  1. Michsean7485

    Michsean7485 PetForums Newbie

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    I have a male jack russell, we’ve had him since a pup he’s now 10 years old.
    The problems we have is his aggression it used to be only towards my partner but now myself and daughter are at risk, it’s got to the stage I can’t even walk him as he will want to attack me if I go near him to attach lead, I can’t even get close enough to put muzzle on him he’s very stubborn, when he attacks most of the time there’s no warning it’s 0-10 straight away, it’s like he blacks out and savagely attacks bitting several times before snapping out of it, the reasons for attacking have been just because my partner picks up his phone he goes for him, or he will suddenly just start growling aggressively then the moment any one makes the slightest movement he attacks, I’ve got to the stage of being so fearful of him at the same time so stressed at the thought of how can I help him if he needs a vet if I can’t even muzzle or put a lead on.
    He’s not been himself last couple of days I think he might be in a bit of discomfort from his back legs as he’s not jumping on sofa so well, but I don’t know what to do or how to get him help with his behaviour his attacks are not little, we have a lot of scars on arms,hands and legs he leaves deep wounds and injuries I’m scared to put that on anyone else please help.
    I would like to add that I’ve tried training, he can be obedient when it comes to giving certain commands like to get down off sofa or bed he will do it or when I say stay or sit he will also do it he won’t try escape or run away, it’s the unpredictable aggression and the fact I can’t harness or leash or wouldn’t dare be able to pick him up anymore like I used too. He will need a vet if he gets any worse but how can I get him to a vet for help!!!
     
    #1 Michsean7485, Jan 13, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2021
  2. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    First off I think you need to speak to your Vet about this. Hopefully it won’t be the first time that they’ve dealt with the issue of not actually being able to physically get an animal ‘captured’ for treatment, and might be able to suggest a solution?

    You need to look at wether or not your dog’s behaviour is being affected by any pain, or neurological issues before anything else.
     
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  3. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    When I worked for a vet there was a client with a similar dog of the same breed. They could not get near him to bring him in to the surgery so another nurse and I went in with a dog catcher (noose on a stick) and caught him. I wonder if the vet would have this option. It sounds like something is wrong with him (this dog was epileptic) so he definitely needs a vet visit and sadly, if nothing can be diagnosed, you might have to consider that it is not fair on either him or your family to keep him. In fact if he is really causing injuries I am not sure why you have kept him this long.

    the other thing you could try is to tempt him into a crate with some very tempting food and shut the door on him when he is in.
     
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  4. Michsean7485

    Michsean7485 PetForums Newbie

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    I’ve dealt with it this long as it wasn’t fair to put it on anyone else we’ve got by with good days and bad, he’s not always bad so we cope, I have suggested to my partner That it could be time to put him to sleep as but he doesn’t agree for the simple reason he doesn’t believe in just ending his life nor do I but I am at the point that I can’t deal with him any more, the dog crate idea I already do I got a portable material based one that has a blanket it that he uses as his bed/safe place but my concern is once in there how would the vet get to him to give him something to sedate him. As much as he stresses me out upsets me I would not want to see him getting stressed and in a bad state due to fear, and because of COVID we are not aloud in the vets he has to be handed over at the door. I would also only be able to get him in travel crate/ bed if he goes on his own he isn’t coaxed in to it that sets the growling off and food doesn’t help either.
     
  5. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    I think you have to accept that your dog is already in a state of stress, fear or pain to behave as he does, and whatever it takes to get him seen by a Vet is probably in his best interests.
     
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  6. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    He needs to see a vet, so you need to find a way to get him there. Don't worry about what happens when he gets there - vets know how to manage aggressive dogs - but make sure the vet knows that he is aggressive. The only other option would be to get a home visit, but I don't know if that's possible with COVID (I'm not in the UK).

    Your dog sounds very, very unhappy and as awful as it seems, being put to sleep may be the kindest thing you can do for him unless there's something medical which is easily solved.
     
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  7. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    If you can get him in a crate, get him in a crate and to the vet.

    I would call the vet and let them know that you're basically at the mercy of when he decides to get in the crate. I'm sure they will figure out a way to accommodate you.
    I imagine what will happen is they will take him whenever you can get him in a crate and to them, and then you'll leave him until they can get to him to examine him.
    Please don't worry about the stress factor. One, it's likely he won't be as stressed as you imagine, and two, vets and vet techs are much more adept at handling bitey things than the average dog owner ;) They will likely get him in and out with minimal fuss.

    But he needs to be looked at. It could be something really simple like an tooth infection that has gotten really painful, or it could be something more serious, but he deserves an investigation at least.
     
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  8. LotsaDots

    LotsaDots PetForums Senior

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    This does sound as if it's a serious issue rather than just grumpy terrier syndrome! We have had terriers in the family for years and some have had a bit of an attitude but never to this extent. I agree with the other replies you need to get him to a vet by any means you can. They will be able to handle him and he may not actually react as badly if he's in unfamiliar surroundings. I hope it's something fixable.
     
  9. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    If it is not fixable you owe it to your dog to put him out of his misery and have him put to sleep. Totally unfair on him as well as your family to live with a dog like this. The vets will have no problem getting him out of the crate, he will not be half as bad as the feral cats they have to handle for neutering. He will probably be relieved to be handled by someone who is not scared of him and makes him feel secure.

    By the way I never suggested you rehomed the dog, that would be cruel, immoral and downright dangerous. If he cannot lead a normal life within your family he needs to be put to sleep
     
  10. Michsean7485

    Michsean7485 PetForums Newbie

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    Just an update and to say thank you for all your comments, I was having a bad week and felt I was at breaking point after after a good few sleepless nights and a lot of tears and serious discussions with my partner we have made some decisions for now getting him put to sleep is not an option we owe it to our dog and ourselves to try again, we have also found out what his limping issue is and it turns out he had a little fawn in his paw that we are dealing with, for the aggression we are starting him on behaviour training that will start at the end of the month that’s the earliest possible date but we are ok with that. It’s going to be a day by day process with a lot of patience but we’re willing to try, he hasn’t bitten anyone for a few weeks so it’s not a constant so we can manage this, from research and observation it seems to be dominance based it’s like he doesn’t know his place, he can be calm just grumpy but that comes with the jack russell personality it’s being able to draw the line, our issues got out of hand and we let it now time to fix it and now my partner realises how serious this is and what it’s been doing to me he has come to his senses especially now it comes down to life or death for the little guy that he has no choice but to help fix this so fingers crossed we get somewhere and there’s improvement, but thank you for your advice I did take that on board.
     
  11. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    The bolded part is a bit concerning.
    What makes you think this, is the trainer you're using suggesting this?
     
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  12. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    It’s good that you’re going down this route.

    No good behaviourist will see him without an all clear from your Vet regarding his health.

    Don’t listen to any trainer who spouts ‘pack theory’ or ‘hierarchy’ because this was all proven to be wrong ages ago, not least by the guy who put forward the research in the first place.
     
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  13. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    The first step is still to get a thorough vet check, especially given his age (I also have a 10 year old terrier), and then get a behaviourist referral. I wouldn't expect a reputable trainer to agree to work with you without an all-clear from the vet.
     
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  14. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Firstly, his behaviour isn’t dominance based and what kind of behaviour training do you mean?

    Any trainer who spouts about dominance and pack leader is best avoided otherwise he will be a very unhappy and stressed dog and his aggression could get worse.

    A good behaviourist, following a vet referral would be best.
     
    Boxer123 and Sarah H like this.
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