Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

aggressive biting pup

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by lexie2010, Jun 7, 2010.


  1. lexie2010

    lexie2010 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2010
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    6
    my beagle is 11weeks old and is really aggressively biting us when we pet her, when we say no, or do the "ouch" noise she just goes at it again growling! i am concerned that this is a bit more than normal puppy biting. she has lots of teething toys and certainly isnt neglected or lacking in attention. when shes good shes a dream but when she is bad shes VV bad, have tried everything in every book and website and nothing stops her!
     
  2. Pixie2010

    Pixie2010 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    51
    I have some similar issues with my 12 week old shihtzu. Other than the mouthing which is getting better, she also sometimes flings herself at me to get at flesh! I have found time out in her crate is starting to work as yelling etc just winds her up more. And before anyone says don't use a crate as punishment I know but it works and she still loves it! The attacks are usually when she is tired so she tends to settle down to nap. It is hard and scary but am sure it doesn't mean aggression :)
     
  3. Montys_Mum

    Montys_Mum PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    We found that too and were worried. So we did the stand up and ignore until puppy calms down, and then praise.

    We also did the time out, but used the kitchen. Once he'd quietened down for a few minutes, then he was allowed out.

    Also, if he was biting, we'd give him a toy in exchange for our hand/arm. So he'd chew that instead of us.

    He seemed to grow out of it in the end.
     
  4. Pixie2010

    Pixie2010 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    51
    Just to let you know I am having some success with growling today - seems to be a language she understands!
     
  5. yorkiegal

    yorkiegal PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    May 31, 2010
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have the same problem with 11 week old Baxter but it tends to be when he's at his most active and excited. If I make the high pitched noise to show he's hurt me, he just lunges at me again and growls a lot too. I find that picking him up and laying him on the sofa on his back whilst I lean over him and rub his tummy for a few seconds helps to calm him down again, and remind him I'm the dominant one in the house. If he's in the mood to bite my feet I put them up on the sofa out of the way and give him a different toy to play with.
     
  6. hutch6

    hutch6 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 9, 2008
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    626
    First off what are you all doing to your dogs before they start biting you?

    They will bite if they want to play which is a good thing as you can work around this by using a tug toy rather than your hand or arm.

    They will bite of they are feeling pain. I am not saying you are intentionally hurting them but there could be a painful underlying issue that when touched as you are stroking them will cause major discomfort - my resuce has this with his hips. With htis no matter how much you shout and ignore you wil not resolve the issue as they want you to bugger off int he first place so they are getting what they want. What you have to do is to start off doing something they like such as a head scratch, reward it. Then move to a light neck rub, reward it. Chest rub, reward it etc until you get to the point of where you touch them and they bite. Now you need to be thoughtful and work out if it is the pressure that is causing pain, the direction fo the stroking, a hernia, an injury etc.

    Quick nutrition tip: If your dog hates their back end being touched first of all get them x-rayed for hip dys and if that is not the issue then consider moving them gradually onto a gluten free diet. Keep them on the gluten free stuff for about 2 months to allow for the previous rubbish to work it's way out of the dog's system.
    If your dog has a reaction to gluten then the two main parts are the stomach and the joints. The pelvic area and back leags get the most strain and pressure as that is the driving engine.
    My eldest collie has a gluten intollerance (as most dogs do) and when I changed to gluten free he gradually became a lot more touchy feely. Now he's just a big cuddle monster compared ot what he was like.
     
  7. Pixie2010

    Pixie2010 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    623
    Likes Received:
    51
    Just to say we are all talking about puppies not dogs in pain!!! Well mine isn't she us just a bit over zealous with the biting. As you can see from the posts dogs all respond in different wats. Not all will perfectly follow the bite stops here method step by step. Play biting is one thing but my pixie gets very bitey when over tired so has time out. I appreciate pain is a bite trigger but don't make us feel like we all have broken dogs!!
     
  8. puppymadness

    puppymadness PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Messages:
    614
    Likes Received:
    734
    my dog was just the same when she as that age i thought it drove me mad, i cpuldnt wak throughout the house without her bitting my feet or hanging onto my troussers it drove me insane! i tried everything in the book and nothing seemed to work the yelping just spured her on!

    But in when she was about 4 months old it just stopped and now never does it

    keep up your good work xx
     
  9. sketch

    sketch PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2009
    Messages:
    2,092
    Likes Received:
    34
    It could be that you are getting pupsters a little to excited when playing, each pups level of excitement is different, so get excited very quickly, others take a little longer etc.
    Try to play calmly with pupster, I know easier said than done as they are cute when playing haha.
    If biting starts say ah ah, or no, and replace your arm with a toy, it does get easier honestly
    xx
     
  10. yorkiegal

    yorkiegal PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    May 31, 2010
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Baxter does it during his mad half hour when he's bombing round the room playing with every toy he has. If I pick up a toy to play with him he attacks my hnds instead. I throw the toy and he chases after it but brings it back straight to me and bites me again. I find that when he's that excited its better to just let him play with his toys whilst staying out of his way. When he's calmer and still nipping, he responds to the word 'leave' quite well. I also find that a good walk around the garden on his long lead also gets rid of his pent up energy.

    He is having problems with his right ear at the moment though. He has scratched it til it bled and also has been biting his legs. He's had flea treatment so i think it may be a food intolerance and am cutting out the biscuits I'd put him on and gone back to the brand his breeder used. That seems to have had results but in the meantime I avoid stroking that side of his head til it's cleared up.
     
  11. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    4,776
    Likes Received:
    163
    Hi

    If you look at the top of the page you will see a sticky on how to deal with a nipping pup. May be of use.

    x
     
  12. lemmsy

    lemmsy PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 12, 2008
    Messages:
    2,569
    Likes Received:
    943
    I agree.

    Just read through this thread and have seen suggestions of growling at the pup!

    I really don't think this is a good idea!!! It is likely to result in either one of the following:
    1. Pup becomes more excited/ thinks that you are initiating play and so continues to nip and becomes more aroused and begins to play far more roughly.
    2. Pup is intimidated and shows a minor fear response. This is not what we want. You do not want to start your relationship with your pup with inconsistent positive/negative associations. This will create a state of confusion for the dog, especially if you were to continue opt for shouting and growling as a form of punishment (please don't!!! :() for other slightly undesirable behaviours that are bound to occur as the pup matures.

    So what should you do?

    Here's the deal with pretty much every undesirable behaviour you will experience when raising a puppy: instead of punishing the pup YOU teach an alternative behaviour. I.E. teach them how you DO want them to behave.

    In the case of puppy nipping/biting the pup is not nipping in an aggressive way, on the contrary the pup will only be trying to initiate play like he would with other pups. However we need to teach the pup what sort of play behaviour is acceptable. :thumbup:

    Instead of teaching a "no-bite" behaviour, I would highly suggest teaching a bite inhibition which should in turn be generalised to play with other dogs. A bite inhibition basically means teaching the dog that mouthing (with other dogs/whatever) is OK but it must not be painful or break the skin. You are teaching the pup to have a soft mouth.
    The following article explains really well how to teach a bite inhibition, so I've copied and pasted a link below (saves me alot of typing):

    http://www.deesdogs.com/documents/teachingbiteinhibition.pdf



    As Sketch also pointed out it is also a good idea to teach them an alternative behaviour/to redirect the behaviour whilst you are teaching the above. Perhaps ask them to perform a sit and then reward them with their toy (which they are fine to mouth and play roughly with).

    Using a negative punishment (when behaviour is followed by the removal of a favourable stimulus- here the "favourable stimulus" is attention) can also be used to teach the pup that nipping/OTT behaviour is not rewarded at all by attention. To do so, the moment the pup starts to nip I would turn my back on them and without a word walk away calmly. At this age pups crave our attention anyway so by withdrawing attention when the pup performs undesirable behaviours we are teaching the pup that these behaviours are neither favourable nor rewarded and yet we are doing so in a non-threatening, calm way which encourages our pups to "think" for themselves.

    The good news is that you all have, by the sound of things, a bunch of lovely enthusiastic pups who will respond really well to positive reinforcement training.
    For more information about how dogs learn and positive reinforcement/clicker training, check out the following articles:
    https://sites.google.com/site/lucysdogblog/understanding-the-basics--learning-theory

    https://sites.google.com/site/lucysdogblog/understanding-the-basics--clicker-training

    Hope this helps :)
     
    #12 lemmsy, Jun 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice