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After some advice about dog sitting

Discussion in 'Dog Services' started by chrissie-h, May 21, 2010.


  1. chrissie-h

    chrissie-h PetForums Junior

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    Hi everyone,

    I'm hoping someone can give me some advice.
    I've had dogs all my life - until a year ago I shared a pack of 7 Siberian Huskies with my (now ex) boyfriend (long story and lots of heartbreak - I still see them though and they are all well and happy with him:))

    Anyway, I was looking after the sibes full time for 5 years, raised them from pups, etc. I learned a lot about multiple dog management, feeding raw diets, and general dog care. I've also owned and looked after malamutes and border collies in the past, and as such have a lot of experience with lively, boisterous 'challenging' dogs!

    For now I am living in a city as I am studying for a PhD and as much as I would love my own dog I feel it is not the right time at the moment.
    I am very flexible in where I work (most of my work is reading annd writing) and can travel as long as I can get an internet connection.....

    So, Im thinking that maybe I could earn a bit of cash and also get to spend time with lots of lovely dogs by doing some dog/house sitting.

    I know when I had sibes I didn't trust anyone else who didn't have experince in sled dogs to look after them. Unfortunately, most people who did have the know-how also had their own dogs to look after and were tied down.

    I figure I could be quite useful and maybe give people a chance to get a hoiliday that they might not otherwise be able to take....

    Anyway, the point of all this is.... where do I start?! lol Is it best to join up with an agency, or should I work freelance? What level of insurance would I need? Are contracts necessary?

    Any advice would be very much appreciated...

    Thanks in advance,

    Chrissie x
     
  2. rona

    rona Guest

    Third party liability is a must and a CRB check would help you to get work.
    If you feel like you could manage freelance then that would obviously be better for you,
    If you put pet sitting contracts into Google, you can then select a contract or it would give you ideas for your own
    I hope this helps
     
  3. chrissie-h

    chrissie-h PetForums Junior

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    Thanks Rona,

    I hadn't thought about a CRB check, but yes, that sounds like a good idea.
    I googled contracts as you suggested and found some useful stuff, thanks:) x
     
  4. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

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    Rona is absolutely correct. All professional pet sitting services have a CRB check, public liability insurance and registration.

    I would be happy to offer any further advice if you want to pm me :)
     
  5. tosca

    tosca PetForums Member

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    The only problem if you do it on your own is you have no back up if you have a problem/can't carry on. Through an agency you always have someone to turn to and take over if you have an accident or get ill. You would still have the flexibility to pick and choose your jobs.
     
  6. john doe

    john doe PetForums Junior

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    My mum does dog sitting, mainly for friends but word soon gets around and others will ask you to look after theirs. She only looks after little dogs as she retired and doesn't have the strength to handle large ones. She really enjoys it and it tops the pension up a little as well.
     
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