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Advice re: Border Collie Puppy

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by DevonGem, May 14, 2010.


  1. DevonGem

    DevonGem PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all, im new to this forum and just have a quick query I hope somebody can help me with :eek:
    I have a border collie puppy who is 4 months old, he's a lovely little chap and we are having no problems with him - ive had border collies before over the years but they have always been rescue dogs - therefore not puppies so this is my first collie puppy :eek:

    My query is this - when we go for walks he is generally excellent, walks to heel, sits and waits at kerbs etc. but he has a "thing" about grass, gets very excited if we are near grass or if he gets a paw on it - i dont let him go on the grass until I decide however the last few days he has started to literally "take off" when he sees/smells grass. I instantly stop - dont pull him back just stop so he tends to almost spin on the lead, he'll then run back to me and jump up biting and snapping at my legs and biting the lead. I know this isnt an aggression issue, he is just very overexcited - its cute and almost comical in a puppy of his age however I do NOT want it to escalate so he's doing it when hes a 40 pound adult and it wont be so cute then! Any ideas of what I can do when he does this will be greatly appreciated.
    Sorry I went on so long!
     
  2. spid

    spid PetForums VIP

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    Hi - and welcome - I also have a 4 month old border collie pup - she too loves grass - loves rubbing her nose in it etc but not to the extent of your pup (her 'thing' that gets her that excited is other dogs). I'm not the best with advise but I would try to take him to grass A LOT and desensitize him. Is he food motivated? Can you get his attention with a treat and a 'watch me'? This is what I am doing with my girl - I sit her, get a treat and say 'watch me' (it doesn't always work but does more and more now) until she is calm and we can move on.

    I'm sure others will be along with better advise - loads of us own BCs

    (I wish mine was a well behaved in other aspects - we are still working on those)
     
  3. leashedForLife

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    i;d get a 30-ft long-line, clip Pup on it and let em be a idiot, running after a toy or a ball big-enuf to shoulder or nose about -
    too big to get a mouth around.

    as *spid said, getting the pup accustomed to it as an ordinary surface means spending time on it - and providing an alternate
    activity to jumping-up and nipping at U - a ball, a tug, a tuff squeak-toy to toss, etc - is much-more fun for both of U. :thumbup:

    cheers,
    --- terry
     
  4. DevonGem

    DevonGem PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for the advice guys - I dont think i explained myself properly :confused:
    its not that he does it when we are actually on a field/grass its when we are pavement walking and there is a garden nearby or simply a grass verge - he goes off leash on a friend's fenced field every day so he is used to grass - it almost seems like a temper tantrum in that i wont let him stop and sniff and roll around in one inch of grass! make any sense? :confused::
     
  5. leashedForLife

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    teach him that if he SITs, he gets a sniff - if only for a few seconds. then move on.
    --- t
     
  6. Spellweaver

    Spellweaver PetForums VIP

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    Hiya and welcome to the forum! Your pup's behaviour makes perfect sense - and a temper tantrum is exactly what he is having, just like any youngster who can't do just exactly what he wants to do when he wants to do it. He thinks of grass as a great place to be, where he can play off lead - and when he sees grass he decides that's what he wants to do, and has a temper tantrum because he's on a lead and can't get to it.

    You need to nip this in the bud pretty quickly, because border collies learn so quickly it is easy for them to learn bad habits. If I were you, when he starts this behaviour I would tell him "No!" very firmly, then tell him to "Sit" and make him sit by your side. Praise him when he sits still, then continue your walk. You will have to do this several times, but he will soon begin to understand that the jumping up and down, biting and snapping are not allowed.
     
  7. katiefranke

    katiefranke PetForums VIP

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    yep would agree with this - basically teach an alternate behaviour that you would prefer to the pulling towards the grass. and then if pup can offer you that 'appropriate' behaviour, you can reward with a quick sniff of the grass.

    it really depends too on what you want to allow in the future. if you want no sniffing really on a road walk, then probably best to start as you mean to go on, but good luck, especially with a pup learning about the world! if you dont mind a little bit, which is what i allow, then after doing the above, allow a quick sniff and then say something like 'lets go' or 'this way' etc (whatever you want) and then walk on.

    you will find that after a little while of doing this, pup will start to understand that you will be carrying on after a couple of seconds and start to move along with you as soon as you start to say your 'cue'.

    oh and would love to see piccies!!!! I am border collie mad :thumbup:
     
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