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Advice / opinions appreciated

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by JadeDzg, Apr 30, 2019.


  1. JadeDzg

    JadeDzg PetForums Newbie

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    Hi guys ☺ I'm hoping you can give me some advice. After months of research and obsessing over everything dog – my partner and I are very serious about getting a pup!

    We live in a spacious apartment by the sea with lots of dog friendly parks and surrounding green areas but we don't have our own private garden. I've researched alot about 'apartment dogs' but I don't feel as if our living situation fits the info that's out there. I'll explain...

    I'm lucky enough to work in a large, dog friendly large office with many colleagues dogs visiting daily. So I'd be able to take my pup to work and also give it a chance to make some furry friends! He/she will very rarely be left alone. The support network I have at work is also very strong and everyone's massive big dog lovers so they'd have a lot of love and attention from more than just my partner and me!

    My partner also works in the education sector so our pup can even have some time off from the office during the holidays

    We're a pretty active couple too and love to go out on the weekends for walks along the beach and countryside.

    I guess it'd be really helpful to know from experienced owners if I have rose tinted glasses on? Is there anything I'm missing? We're well aware that owning a puppy is hard work and we're more than willing to put in the graft to be the best dog owners we can be. Our worst fear is letting our future pup down so we want to make sure we've covered all grounds!

    It'd just be great to get your opinion on our situation or if you're in a similar one and can offer some advice.

    Thank you for you help ☺

    P.S. We're not 100% on a breed yet but we're looking at small active dogs such as beagles, puggles and small crossbreeds. Would love to hear if you have any recommendations too
     
  2. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Welcome!

    Firstly I definitely would not recommend a beagle for a beginner owner - they can be very demanding dogs. Regarding ‘Puggles’, you would not be able to find an ethically bred dog because, quite frankly, putting a high energy working dog like a beagle with a low energy brachy dog like a pug just creates a train wreck of a dog in many instances, so no reputable breeder would do that. You should be able to find a small crossbreed pup in rescue, but there are also lots of other small active dog breeds that would suit - many of the terriers for a start.

    Regarding your situation, the one thing that jumped out at me is toilet training. Which floor do you live on? I raised my first puppy in a 2nd floor flat and toilet training was so hard and took so much longer. It’s hard to get the pup outside quickly, particularly in the middle of the night, and the inevitable in-and-out of toilet training was a killer!

    Your day to day arrangements sound generally fine. Be careful that the pup doesn’t end up getting overwhelmed in your office circumstances - spending lots of time with other dogs in particular is not necessarily a good thing. I would definitely recommend crate training so your pup can have (enforced!) rests regularly during the day. Also don’t fall into the trap of someone always being with the dog - they need to learn to spend time alone too.

    I’m sure other members will be along soon with more advice.
     
  3. JadeDzg

    JadeDzg PetForums Newbie

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    Hi McKenzie!

    Thanks for your reply.

    Ah thats interesting... Lots of reading have suggested that beagles are a good first dog and that puggles are a good medium – thanks for the tip! Any terrier in particular you'd recommend?

    We live on the first floor so could be out and across to the green within 20 seconds which I think is doable...

    I often work from home or cafes for some days too so pup won't be in everyday but when he is, he'll feel comfortable. But yes, I totally agree with you , I want to be able to build him up to be independent and confident for short periods of time without me or other around.

    I really appreciate your thoughts – Thanks again! ☺
     
  4. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    There’s not many beagle owners on the forum, and I’m just trying to remember the user name of our member who has a few. But generally they are ruled by their nose, are very independent, very intelligent but not in a handler-oriented way, can be noisy. Of course there’s lots of great things about them too, but I feel they need an experienced owner to get the best out of them.

    Generally the rule of thumb is that it’s very difficult to find an ethical cross-breed breeder. They are out there in some breeds, but generally cross breed puppies come from either puppy farms or back yard breeders / ‘oops’ litters, and a lot of people don’t want to ‘reward’ bad breeding with money. When you get a rescue puppy you might be getting one of these puppies anyway, but you’re not lining the breeder’s pockets and encouraging them to breed again.

    Ethical breeders will health test their breeding stock for particular problems in the breed (xrays, DNA tests etc, not just a once over from a vet), put together a bitch and dog who complement each other, only breed from dogs with stellar temperaments, and ideally be using dogs who excel in some way (showing, working, sports etc).

    I’m a big terrier fan - I think they’re such fun little dogs. I have a Westie who is just the best dog in the world, but the breed is prone to skin conditions / allergies, so you want a breeder who has clear lines. I also have a Wheaten terrier who is the definition of active! But probably a bit big for you. Cairns are also great dogs, Jack Russells or Parson Russells, mini Schanusers would all be good options. Also possibly cocker spaniels, or mini poodles would suit.
     
    #4 McKenzie, Apr 30, 2019
    Last edited: May 1, 2019
    JadeDzg, Blitz, Picklelily and 3 others like this.
  5. DaisyBluebell

    DaisyBluebell Earth, the insane asylum of the Universe

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    Dont get a Beagle, great for experienced owners that know their dog will be off after a scent before its realised the dog has gone so definitely not for first time owners.
    Please dont get a 'designer' dog, they are after all just mutts given silly names bred primarily telling people they were hypoallergenic! No dogs are, and are usually bred by 'hobby' breeders i.e. someone who has a dog & a mate down the road who has a dog & both want to make a few bob! You can get a crossbreed from any rescue home without the silly name.
    As McKenzie says toilet training, especially during the night, is hard with a garden without once is likely to take months. Dont listen to anyone who says use puppy pads all they teach a pup us that it's ok to go indoors!
    Your situation sounds pretty good for having a dog, not so good for having a puppy unless you really are happy to get up maybe 2 or even 3 times during the night & get your pup outside quickly armed with torchlight & dog bags & then get up for work next morning. Remember to have a pup you will need to put the pups needs b4 your own for about 6 months. Check out the stickies at the top of the page about the Realities of getting a puppy & the sticky called Puppy Support thread regarding getting Puppy Blues.
    Having said all the above a slightly older dog may fit into your lives perfectly, check out a few rescue places you may find you fall for a dog that you would never have expected who will take little toilet training & will not be overwhelmed with meeting a lot of dogs that are around in your working environment.
    Do let us know as and when you do get something it will be interesting to see what you fall for ;)
     
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  6. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    For toilet training in a flat, some people use a piece of turf in a waterproof tray so the pup learns to go on grass.

    Saves on accidents as often there is very little warning of them needing to go and much easier during the night.
     
  7. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    I would say your situation sounds great but, do remember with a pup there is lots of going outdoors at 3 am would your local park be suitable?
    The other thought is with an apartment dog you also need to think about noise, lots of terriers can be quite vocal I have a Schnauzer cross who can be very noisy at times even when you are in.
    So if you choose a breed you need to choose a breeder who has a more relaxed line and will help you pick out a quiet pup. Lots on the Schnauzer have quiet dogs chosen from less prey driven lines.

    Have a look on the kennel club pages for breeds.

    I would recommend making a short list of breeds then joining a Facebook group for those breeds, lurk and also ask the best and the worst of the breed.
    For mine
    Schnauzer
    Pro's Super intelligent, very trainable and loves to learn tricks, very people orientated, low dander, low shedding active and agile
    Cons Need more exercise than you think, manipulative they will train you if you aren't careful, vocal and can be excitable when seeing other dogs, grooming needs are high.
    The cross side of my girl made her excessively excitable and energetic she wasn't for the average family so be cautious on crosses.
     
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  8. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Mine are miniature poodles. They can be vocal if allowed, mine are not allowed so are not bad. They are lively and need a fair bit of exercise, easy to train, do not moult but do need clipping regularly and are very sociable. Bear in mind if you go for a poodle cross it is as likely to moult as not. Night time with a pup - I have had numerous pups and never got up. I have always put newspaper down in the kitchen and left them to it. It does not take long before they are clean at night. My current two are the first dogs I have had crates for and both came from breeders who had crate trained them and they both went through the night clean from the first day home. The night initially being midnight till six then gradually spread out. Other breeds that might suit you are border terriers or cairns or westies.
     
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  9. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    DaisyBluebell, JadeDzg and Lurcherlad like this.
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