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Advice on buying a puppy.

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by sallyanne, Jul 8, 2008.


  1. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    There are many things to consider when buying a puppy.

    What Breed,your lifestyle,what gender,size,and most importantly what health issues are found within your chosen breed.

    Buying a puppy should be a careful,thoughtful decision and all members of the family should agree.

    It helps to visit Dog Shows/Events and talk to Breeders with years of experience and a wealth of knowlege of your chosen breed.

    So where do you find a Breeder?
    A good starting point is the breed clubs,they usually know of good reptuable ethical breeders.The kennel club has a list of breed clubs.A link to the KC The Kennel Club

    It is very important to know where your puppy comes from,there are lots of Disreputable and Commercial Breeders out there who will only be too happy to take your cash and sell you a sickly non health tested puppy.Do Not buy a puppy because you feel sorry for it,this only encourages this sort of person to keep breeding.

    You should always see the puppies with there Dam (Mother), the Sire (father) may not be available to be viewed as he may be owned by someone other than the Breeders.The Breeder will usually only be too happy to give you the contact details and show photos of the sire.
    Check that the Dam appears healthy,has a good temperament and the puppies appear healthy.

    Ask to see all the relavent paperwork, Pedigree,KC Registration Documents and proof of Health Testing required for your chosen breed.The Kennel Club is the only offical registration body,if puppies are registered with any other Registration Company or not registered at all ask the Breeder why.These Breeders are best avoided as their main objective of Breeding such a litter will usually be for fiancial gain,rather than improving on a breed or retaining a puppy for showing.

    Be prepared for the Breeder to ask you lots of questions,they do this because they want the best possible homes for there puppies,they will also welcome any questions you have.They will provide you with Diet,Worming,Excercise & Socialisation advice along with full support when you take your puppy home.The recommended age in which puppies should go to their new homes is 8 weeks of age,be wary of Breeders who want you to collect your puppy earlier than this.
    Be wary of Breeders who try and convince you that because of the colour of the puppy it is worth more money because it's "rare".If the colour is recognised by the KC it is not unusual or rare.

    If you have any suspicions or doubts about a Litter or Breeder,contact your nearest Breed Club and check the Breeder out with them, or Walk Away.
     
  2. cav

    cav PetForums VIP

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    AGREE!!!
    Very good thread sally..:)
     
  3. raindog

    raindog PetForums Senior

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    I agree with everything Sally has said, with only one slight caveat. Since we started our breed rescue organisation 17 months ago, we have come across several totally unethical "breeders" within our breed, who are both breed club members and members of the KC Accredited Breeder Scheme. So - even with breeders who are breed club members and KC Accredited Breeders, you still have to be extremely careful as membership of these schemes is no guarantee that the breeders will be ethical and their pups high quality.
    The sad fact is that bad breeders outnumber good ones by a significant margin and that buying a puppy - especially for the first time - is a minefield.:mad::mad:
     
  4. Dennyboy

    Dennyboy PetForums Member

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    So very true :mad: its wrong that people abuse their status,sugar coat it and then the others that are doing the same thing,back them up!!

    So many people dont bother to research their chosen breed,they assume its just a dog :rolleyes: they go buy a cute little pup ,think that a quick walk once a week will do, then wonder why it tears the house to bits :eek:

    Some of the Rescue places ive been to dont seem to have a clue either :(
    Friend i met through Rescue had a male Stafford.They went to get another Rescue dog and was offered another male Stafford :eek::eek:

    They took him home and tried their best to settle them but had to take him back after two days as he kept attacking their other one......Well said rescue told them to let them sort it out themseves!!!!!:eek::mad:

    Needs to be tighter regulations on breeding and selling.
     
  5. HavaneseLover

    HavaneseLover PetForums Newbie

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    Great thread Sally. Buying a puppy is a big responsibility and everyone should do their homework before jumping in.
     
  6. future_police_handler

    future_police_handler PetForums Newbie

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    Yeah great advice. I think people should really read up on their chosen breed and maybe go to a recommended breeder(maybe through a friend or previous buyers) because like people have said, there are a lot of bad breeders and people don't know because they don't read up on it!
     
  7. robert007

    robert007 PetForums Newbie

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    When you are ready buy a puppy visit the puppy more than once.
    Note the surroundings and be sure yours and puppy's previous circumstances are same. Puppies bred commercially and carelessly, so consider its behavior.


    -------------
    robert
    Social media marketing
     
  8. clueless

    clueless Banned

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    Another good piece of information to get is the Breed Register from the KC. Try and find out how many litters the breeder has bred in a year as Quality is better than Quantity and if a lot of litters being bred yearly, to me screams Money Making Breeder
     
  9. Bobble'n'Moo

    Bobble'n'Moo PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Sallyann, sorry this is not in relation to the thread but where did you get your 'No to breed legislation' attachment? I would love to have that as my email signature if i can...
     
  10. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

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    Absolutely agree. The kennel club run no checks on breeders that I know of. Recommendation is the way to go. In my humble opinion of course ;)

    I would also add, that for every puppy we purchase from a breeder, one will die as a result of over crowding at rescue centres. There are breed rescue centres all over the country, so no excuse. That said however, our puppy was purchased from a breeder. We waited for months for a young GSD, having our names down at various rescue centres, and none became available. I would like to add that our two rescue cats are doing just fine.
     
    #10 Nina, Aug 1, 2008
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2008
  11. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    Nina there is an excuse because a rescue may not be for everyone,especially those rescue dogs with little or no history.Families with young children often won't take on a dog with an unknown history.
    Rescues also have blanket policies in place which make it difficult for some people to aquire a rescue dog.

    The first post was mean't as guidance for those considering buying a puppy.:)
     
  12. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

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    Yes I understand that completely, and I also mentioned how we brought from a breeder, so for once we have found some common ground :D

    However, there are many dogs placed in rescue centres where the history is known, i.e. credit crunch, people handing pets over as a result of losing their job etc. Where people die and have no other family members, and of course as a result of divorce.

    At Battersea they have implemented a strict behavioural assessment before placing dogs in homes and in these cases prospective adopters have dogs that have already been trained!

    We still have every intention of rescuing a GSD, but have our names down for a dog who is cat friendly. Hence the long wait.

    Nice to agree for once though :D
     
  13. albertsmam

    albertsmam PetForums Newbie

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    I agree who heartdly, we have just decided to get a new dog/puppy and after looking on the net for less than an hour yesterday the amount of people out there trying to make a quick buck is horrible, also people should watch out about the mutlitude of scams out there, after reply to several ads to see what would happen, i received several emails, all from 'breeders' stating that they wanted to give thier babies away for free, if only they could have my full address and name to arrange delivery!!! as if i would buy any kind of animal without first seeing it. however it is a sad fact that people fall for these scams (google puppy scam, you will be amazed). People should go to rescue homes as we will do, and rehome a dog that needs it, not one that has been bred to give the owners some money. The sad fact is that these puppies will probably end up there in anyway.
     
  14. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

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    The sad thing is however, that by buying a puppy that you know to come from a puppy farm (wanting to remove them from the squalid situation), you are actually adding to their continuation and profit making.

    However, faced with a malnourished puppy, that looks rather ill, how do you walk away. Its a no win situation for the puppies :(
     
  15. dmsjit67

    dmsjit67 PetForums Newbie

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    Pretty nice threat ,thx;)
     
  16. Sgurr

    Sgurr PetForums Senior

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    Just a few comments on ways to assess whether you are dealing with a caring breeder or not.

    Ask for references on the breeder - people who have bought pups from an earlier litter or if it's the breeder's first litter (and everyone goes through that) ask for a vet's reference.

    Ask for a copy of the Puppy Sales Contract - if the breeder has one, read it carefully and if there isn't one, ask why not?

    Ask to see the sire's and dam's Health Certificates - if there are not any health checks, why buy there?

    Ask under what circumstances the breeder will take back the puppy

    Did the breeder ask you searching questions about your experience with dogs and family circumstances?

    For the breed you are looking for, search all the ads on e-pupz and the other free sites and see how many litters are advertised from the same breeder if you do this for a few weeks before you are ready to buy your pup you will soon be able to pick out many of the puppy farmers.

    A caring breeder is happy to talk about the breed, the pups, give references, take up references on you. An 'I'm in it for Money' will be showing you the door or hanging up on you pretty quickly.

    Sgurr
     
    #16 Sgurr, Sep 2, 2008
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2008
  17. louise5031

    louise5031 Guest

    Brilliant advice.

    I'd also like to chip in aside from all the necessary health & breeder info, as a new puppy owner I can assure you that it is 100 times more hard work than you will ever think it is!!!

    I wasn't under the impression that it was going to be easy but you do not realise how demanding they are, how much time they take up, and how much attention they need.

    Put it this way, if you're reading this thinking of getting a new puppy, expect the first few weeks/months to be like having a human baby. Are you going to have the time to devote to him/her?? I had to put off all social arrangements let alone work (luckily i dont) and even having people over can be tiring as you are constantly having to watch your puppy in order to toilet train it and stop it chewing your whole house! I've read comments from the net of people taking a couple weeks off their full time jobs to "settle in" the puppy before going back to work all day leaving it alone. This just isn't good enough.

    Be assured though, if you have made up your mind that you're ready for such a commitment, it is one of the most rewarding responsibilities you can imagine :)
     
  18. charlie56

    charlie56 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi! my name is charlotte and i am new to the forum. i really find your advice valuable, but just wondered if anybody had some more specific thoughts on my situation..

    i dont have, nor have ever had, any dogs, but my family (mum, dad, nan and brother of 23) and myself, 19, are currently researching getting a puppy. having sold their time-consuming business, which has prevented us from having a dog in the past, my parents are looking to 'slow down' in terms of their work load, and are looking to move out of our busy town to the west country. they really would like to get a dog (my mum was surrounded by them as a child) but are quite worried as to what a dog would mean for our 2 cats, bobby, aged 3 and freddy, 8 months. maybe i should be posting this in the cat forum, but i just wondered if anybody had any experience or advice regarding the introduction of a puppy to a household with cats? is there a specific breed that might be best...or worst?

    really appreciate you taking the time to read this - id be grateful for any thoughts!:)
     
  19. Sgurr

    Sgurr PetForums Senior

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    Hi,

    It's not usually a problem having cats and a puppy. Cats Rule OK! Especially if there are three of them. I had three cats when I got my first puppy. He got a scratched nose once or twice when he was pushy but he was a quick learner. A good way to introduce them is have the puppy crated so s/he feels safe and let the cats get the smell of the 'intruder'. Keep them apart otherwise. Once the pup knows cats are around and they are ignoring him -as they will after a couple of days - then let the first proper introduction be at feeding time. Cats nearest the door and high up if possible (worksurface) and pup on the floor by you. The pup generally finds the food more attractive than the cats. Just take it slowly and eventually you may have a heap of three cats snoozing on a sleeping dog as we often did. My Springers have all been fine with my cats.

    As to the breed, my personal opinion is that I would not choose a terrier breed or hunting breed to live with cats - other people will disagree, of course. But remember that how a dog behaves with the cats s/he lives with can be very different to the reaction to a strange cat in the garden.

    If a Springer is on your list of possibles then look at my website for info
    Sgurr - English Springer Spaniels - Welcome and then look at Scherzando (in Devon) on my links and there you will find the finest examples of working breeds that make superb country companions.

    Sgurr
     
  20. ashpot

    ashpot PetForums Newbie

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    everyone needs to think long and hard before taking on a new puppy yes you will adore this little bundle of love but it is also hard work all puppys need a caring person someone to be there mother there teacher and everything there little hearts desires as a breeder of shih tzu,s i know sleepless night,s hards work and sad times. but i also know what love these little dogs will give you many people think that breeders are in for the money nothing could be further from the truth from a shihtzu lover ( and breeder) margaret lyon london
     
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