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Advice needed from giant breed owners

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Gracieboo, May 29, 2017.


  1. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, I posted in adoptions last night but don't know if it was the right place. I am thinking of adopting a mastiff/ wolfhound mix from my nephew. They are having another baby so would find walking him and their other dog difficult. He was a rescue pup (already had his tail docked ☹️) and they moved him back from Australia with them. He is laid back with their young child and cat (we also have a young child and cat) but we have no experience with giant breeds, previously had German shepherds as family pets and a rescue disabled lurcher til the end of her life. Even though he will never be left alone wth my daughter could I be confident he wouldn't hurt her? This is my concern, and that he won't see our cat as prey?? Please help because he seems like a lovely boy and would be perfect for us as my husband works from home and he would get lots of excercise with me and my daughter during the day. Thanks
     
  2. SpicyBulldog

    SpicyBulldog PetForums VIP

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    If he has been around another child / cat then he likely will be okay. However, it is a new home, new people, new cat. You want to introduce them properly and monitor closely. Like any dog pay attention to body language. Most mastiff I have been around, despite great size are gentle with children. This doesn't mean all of them can be trusted or that none have ever harmed a child of course.
     
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  3. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

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    As confident as you could be with any dog, although you know thebackground of this dog, so you already have more knowledge that most people who adopt a dog from a rescue
    slow careful introductions and never leaving your daughter alone with him are all the best things you can do
    also be aware although ok with HIS cat he may feel different about yours,
    you sound very grounded :)
     
  4. MrsZee

    MrsZee Guest

    I agree with SpicyBullDog, take it easy and slowly, and if all seems to be going ok, it most likely will do. But check how the dog behaves with food/ toys and his/her own area (I presume there will be a peaceful place for the dog to go). And have a good medical check up so that there wouldn´t be any tender places to touch.

    But to me it seems the dog is already used to children and cats so it should be ok.
     
  5. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you, I think we just needed a little reassurance. I agree, watching the body language and a quiet place is the way forward. We have a baby gate at the bottom of the stairs so the cat can escape if things get a bit hairy Thanks again, I'm glad I found this forum.
     
  6. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I have only advice about cats...not personally a cat owner but have a friend who Foster's dogs for a sight hound rescue and who owns cats as well.

    On the odd occasion dogs have been returned to her, and she has passed dogs to a cat free foster which have come from a home with cats because, it hasn't worked out well.
    The dog which has be returned, from its new cat home struggled with its transition with its new cat family. This may have been no slow introduction, or the dog just saw the cat as any cat and not like the former cats in the home. So good calm introduction to the cat should work.
    Again, when a cat savvy dog who came to be fostered with my friends cats, they obviously just couldn't relate to the cats the same as in the previous home.
    It is few and far between this happens, and the majority are fine, and sighthounds are obviously a different breed.

    So just be careful with cat introductions, and everything should be fine. @Meezey for info on cat introductions. She gave brilliant advice on another thread. May know a bit on giant breeds too
     
  7. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for that, I'll research how to do the introductions. Our cat was a stray and moved herself In 4 years ago as was our other cat who passed away at Christmas. Before that I wouldn't have considered adopting one and am by no means a cat expert. So I'm not entirely sure about the slow introduction works but as I say I will do my research. The link you provided wouldn't allow me to message, I'll try few other avenues. Thanks again, it's much appreciated.
     
  8. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    When the member is online, she will get back to you. She is very helpful, she had cats before dog. Is very knowledgeable on introductions, and also her next breed is maybe going to be a giant breed. So already she will have researched the breed well, as that's her advice to anyone getting any type of dog. Hopefully she will pop online later, or maybe tomorrow.

    You obviously have some knowledge of sighthounds owning a lurcher, and I guess someone who bred this mix was either looking for a bull type lurcher or was just wanting a big powerful dog for some unknown reason. So let's see what advice you get on the dog too...best be forearmed.
    The plus, sounds like you are training your children to be dog savvy too..as young as they are you can do it. Refreshing to read.
     
  9. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Right ok, didn't know she needed to be online, thanks again. My Lurcher was good with small animals except when she was on the lead? Not sure why these two breeds were mixed, however it seems people are doing it deliberately. From what I've read their traits aren't always compatible (or complimentary for that matter) but I do like both breeds and he 'seems' like a good boy so all I can do if we go ahead is take precautions and see if he likes us too. My daughter has gotten to know my mum's rather excitable bichon frisse and my sister's collie so she is aware of dog social etiquette. She is very respectful with animals and has never shown any aggression towards them. So hopefully, long may it continue. Thanks again.
     
  10. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    I have a great dane, when the kids were younger we had two danes.
    The truth? No matter how careful you are, the dog will end up hurting your daughter. Not maliciously, but giants are well, giants. Just today one of my dogs jumped out of the car right on to the top of my foot. I stood there for a second unable to move it hurt so much.
    Our kids have been bowled over by the dogs, had their faces smacked by happy tails, had a near nose break when the great dane decided to shake her toy right next to a child's head... These sorts of things happen. And kids survive them :) Teach your daughter to be resilient about the ouches and bruises that come with giant breed ownership, and to get out of the way!

    As for cats, neither of our dogs are trustworthy with our cats, but they co-exist under a shaky truce as long as one of us is there. I would never in a million years leave them alone together unsupervised.
     
  11. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for that... I remember being bumped and knocked around by our German shepherds but being shoved by a Great Dane would be a whole different experience! Food for thought, I would like to think we would be resilient enough to withstand the blows (unfortunately the tail whipping won't be an issue) but I think a few visits would be the order of the day, especially where the cats concerned. Our cat has free rain at the moment, do you think closing the stair gate would be sufficient? ( After they seem comfortable with each other )
     
  12. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    It really just depends on the dog and the cat. If the cat is smart enough to get away, sure. We have dog-free zones in the house that are blocked off by a baby gate, but it's just courtesy that keeps the dogs out. If they really wanted to they would just knock the gate over or jump it.
     
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  13. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Good point... He's smaller than a Great Dane but I couldn't guarantee he wouldn't bulldoze his way through. As you say I think we will have to see if he's a gentleman or not.
     
  14. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I had a terrier who could clear a proper dog gate...and six foot fences no problem. My other dogs have never been jumpers in the house or garden though..

    So absolutely agree with Ouesi on this, that it's very dog dependent whether a dog will clear baby/ dog gates.

    My new addition whose a lurcher will only clear baby gates and dog gates if she thinks there is something on the other side worth the effort to jump and get to.. still finding her triggers currently one was an empty crisp packet left by my son. Other times she's happy in 'her space'. Door closing is a waste of time...she can open them before people query this.
     
  15. Gracieboo

    Gracieboo PetForums Newbie

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    Crikey...have been checking the house to see if there's a high enough place for the cat to escape in each room. I've been reading about the slow introduction of dogs/cats and most of the info states on lead introductions, which we will do after the scent introduction. The only issue I have is if it all goes horribly wrong, will I be able to hang onto him?
     
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