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Advice for taking dog on a train

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Riley., Apr 20, 2017.


  1. Riley.

    Riley. PetForums Junior

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    Hi everyone. So in June I need to go home to Cornwall for a week and I heard you can take dogs on trains if they are well behaved. The train journey is 6 and a half hours with around 3 changes so I would be able to let Ari go for toilet breaks etc... I have taken her on a public bus before and sat her on my lap and she is generally well behaved but I dont like the thought of putting her in a cage. Has anyone taken their dog on a long train journey before and if so do you have any advice?
     
  2. BlueJay

    BlueJay Pack of Losers

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    Longest I go on with the dogs is just over two hours; Gwen quite happily sits under the seats or by my side (we stay in that bit where you can put bikes etc, away from most of the passengers; firstly because there's more space, less people... and some people might not want a dog sat right by them in their reserved seats haha).
    She skips breakfast if we're going in the morning to reduce the chance of inconvenient poops, and make sure she wees before we get on.
    It varies by train, but for the ones I use, crates etc aren't necessary as long as the dog is on a lead and under control.

    I suppose it totally depends on your dog, really. How she reacts to other people and different situations etc.
     
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  3. Riley.

    Riley. PetForums Junior

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    Aw that's good, she's well behaved but she barks at children for some reason. I think she would be okay if we're changing trains a few times, she does love sitting on my lap because she loves getting the attention :) Also I would be travelling with my partner who would sit next to me so we could swap with her and there would be no randomer next to us.
     
  4. BlueJay

    BlueJay Pack of Losers

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    It might be worth muzzle training her in the time before you go.
    We all know the general public can be massive nobbers.... if she barks at children and somebody takes offence, you might have to deal with someone going "aaaah she bit me!". Even if you know she won't bite, at least with a muzzle you eliminate the risk to onlookers.
    It is absolutely ridiculous how many people will just walk past and touch dogs without asking. Sometimes Gwen wears hers on the train just to get people to leave us alone :Shy
     

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  5. Riley.

    Riley. PetForums Junior

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    I guess, she would never ever bite though, unless someone hit her, she loves a good lick though :p I might keep her on the window side because she likes looking out the window then at least she won't be on the aisle side.
     
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  6. shadowmare

    shadowmare The dog doesn't bite, me on the other hand...

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    My cousin travelled by train with her dog from Glasgow to London when they were moving. It was a first long journey they did with her so they did a few 30mins-1hr local train trips beforehand to prepare the dog for a train environment. They also trained her to be comfortable in a muzzle as it had them peace of mind when people would be rude or just pass too close. Nailing down the sit/down or settle command is also helpful.
     
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  7. Sairy

    Sairy PetForums VIP

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    This! We had to put up with this the other day when we took Holly on a guided cave tour. She is fine in crowds, but people (mostly children) kept stroking her without asking and it made her a bit nervous so we moved away from the crowd. It was very annoying that the parents did not tell their kids to leave her alone (I guess I should have, but it's not easy to step in and tell someone else's kids off), but I bet they would have had something to say if Holly had growled at them.

    Better safe that sorry so a muzzle isn't a bad idea. Also, practise short train journeys in between now and then to get her used to it.
     
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  8. Riley.

    Riley. PetForums Junior

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    In what situation would they not let me on the train with her?
     
  9. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

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    Probably if she really kept barking at people and caused a nuisance then the conductor might ask you to leave the train, but it sounds like she will be ok. She might go to sleep for a bit and as she's a small dog you can carry her easily.
     
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  10. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    The only reason that there would be a problem is if your dog was unruly and not well behaved.

    Muzzle training is an excellent idea...the stress of the journey might be bad enough but the added extra of unruly children and some adults thinking the 'cute dog' is a play item that can cause problems. No one wants to see a dog in a muzzle...but savvy dog owners understand dogs are muzzled for a million and one reasons, not because the dog is vicious..unknowledgeable people give most dogs a break, which is what you need.

    Come on..Bluejays's Gwen rock's her muzzle, and looks adorable! Its a bit like a fashion accessory.
     
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