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A very quick raw question

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by DirtyGertie, Mar 24, 2011.


  1. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    Some of you will know I am considering trying Poppy with raw and will introduce it gradually as we still have a case of Naturediet and a bag of Burns to use up.

    OH is just off to Lidl and I've asked him to get a pack of chicken drumsticks and a pack of chicken thighs so I can put them in the freezer (don't get to Lidl very often :( ).

    Can I give her a drumstick straight from the chilled pack - as in do they need to be frozen first to kill off any nasties and then defrosted, or can she have one either tonight or tomorrow morning?

    Please forgive stupid question :eek: , I'm still very new to this.

    And is this right - I hold the drumstick to start with so she learns to eat it slowly (she's not a gulper anyway) and learn to chew the bone?

    I remember seeing something about bashing it with a rolling pin to break the bone up - is that best for a small dog or just let her get on with it.

    Ta muchly.
     
  2. LexiLou2

    LexiLou2 PetForums VIP

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    I'm not sure about the freezing it thing, I froze mine before i gave them just in case, however Lexi has just started raw and she has being having drumsticks and all i have done is hold one end and make sure she didn't eat it in huge mouth fulls, with the exception of getting my finger munched the first time this has worked well, my only issue has been on a drumstick there is like a knuckley bit that i hold which means it is the last bit she eats and I can't get her to chew it, so i just bash that bit so it breaks up but the rest i let her chew so she gets used to chewing and breaking up bone.
     
  3. SixStar

    SixStar Banned

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    Pork is the only meat that needs to be frozen before feeding, chicken is fine straight from the packet.

    If she's not a gulper, you don't need to hold the bone, just make sure she is very closely supervised whilst she's eating it, and you can step in if she starts to try to eat it too quickly. I've heard of people bashing the bone up but for a small dog I wouldn't worry, just let her have a munch at it.

    I'd never feed raw and cooked in the same day personally, but I know alot do. Mine have kibble one day, and raw the next. If you are going to feed both in the same day though, make sure they are at opposite ends of the day- ie, kibble for breakfast, and the raw for the evening meal.
     
  4. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    Ermm, not quite so. Any game most definitely should be frozen as should beef some say. ;)

    But you are right, you can just feed chicken without prior freezing as freezing does very little to salmonella and the like.
     
  5. SixStar

    SixStar Banned

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    Yes you are right. Sorry I wasnt thinking about game birds, since all the ones I get are already frozen. Pork is the only one I make sure to freeze myself before feeding, not heard about beef needing to before.
     
  6. Souris

    Souris PetForums Senior

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    As the above said- chicken will be fine without freezing.

    The big reason for the bashing is if the dog starts gulping or just generally struggling to eat the bone: see how she goes. If she's struggling, bash it slightly just to break the bone up a little for her, but I'd give it a go whole first to see how she gets on. If she's not ever had a bone before, it may take her a day or two to get used to eating bones, be prepared that she might not eat any of the bone today.
     
  7. Jasper's Bloke

    Jasper's Bloke PetForums VIP

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    Any meat from a supermarket and therefore intended for human consumption is fine to feed straight from the pack. The reason for freezing pork is that it can contain a parasite which I cannot spell (trickysomethingorother) however this only applies to meat from abroad as the parasite is not found in UK meat. Having said that, supermarkets are notoriously liberal in what they class as UK meat and I think there is a loophole that says as long as a certain percentage of the meat is from the UK they can claim it to be a UK product. Better safe than sorry IMHO.

    A small dog will have great difficulty in trying to gulp down a chicken wing so I doubt you would have to hold it to stop that, but you might end up holding the first one or two just to encourage her to eat them until she works out what she is supposed to do. It may sound strange but many dogs are quite puzzled by their first meat on the bone. They know it smells nice and a quick lick confirms it tastes nice, but it's too big. how do I eat that? Don't worry, they tend to work it out pretty quickly!
     
  8. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    I always feed meat fit for human consumption without first freeing, the reason I get my pork from my butcher is that I know where it has come from and is safe to give without first freezing. Trichinosis is a parasite found in pork in other countries but not found in pigs in the UK, so if you know your pork is home produced there is no risk feeding it before freezing. Any other meat from my butcher is also safe, with the exception of beef. Many people think pork is dangerous to feed if not first frozen when in fact it's beef. We have had some cases of Noespora Canium over here and dogs fed on beef without being first frozen are open to it, it's a very small risk but a risk all the same. There have been cases in the UK of dogs being infected, with one case being fatal. Like I said it's a very small risk but I would never feed any beef product without first freezing. All of the mince I get from my supplier arrives frozen so I don't have to worry but I wouldn't buy minced beef from a supermarket and put it straight down for the dogs to eat.

    I have a link somewhere which covers the case of the dog that died but will have to search for it, I have it somewhere but here's a link explaining Neospora Canium:
    An Overview of Neospora Canium and Raw Food Diets

    Found it, here it is and very sad.
    http://anti-dockingalliance.co.uk/page_16.htm
     
    #8 Malmum, Mar 24, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2011
  9. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    Hubby came home with some lovely chicken from Lidl. Drumsticks 1kg = 12 pieces = £2.25, thighs = 7 = £2.65 and a block of Prize Choice from a pet shop = 84p. He was quite impressed cost-wise.

    I was packaging it all in individual portions and Poppy was sat at my feet looking all expectant - poor girl wont be having any till Saturday morning (vet tomorrow, she will be sick on the way so leaving it till Saturday). I'm quite looking forward to giving it a go.
     
  10. Will@GowerVets

    Will@GowerVets PetForums Newbie

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    Trichinella spiralis is the worm you mean. It requires 20 days at minus 15 degress as long as it is less than 6 inches thick. (or 3 days at minus 20)

    Might as well cook it ;)

    Will

    gowervets.co.uk
     
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