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A little question

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by SophieCyde, Apr 8, 2011.


  1. SophieCyde

    SophieCyde PetForums VIP

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    I know nothing about breeding so please bear with me if this question is ridiculous:eek:

    I sometimes come for a peek in the breeding section because I find it very interesting and I always hear people talking about health testing , but is health testing the most importnt thing when breeding?:confused:

    Just because some people sound as if it is but I would of thought temperament and ability(showing,agility ect.) would be just as important?

    What are your thoughts???

    (please just ignore this if it makes no sense, it happens regularly with me :p )
     
  2. borderer

    borderer Guest

    dont have any thoughts i never health test
     
  3. Ridgielover

    Ridgielover PetForums Senior

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    I think that health, temperament and type are all crucial. If you haven't got all of them, then what is the point of breeding on from that animal? It isn't a matter of which is more important - in my opinion they are all vital.
     
  4. Devil-Dogz

    Devil-Dogz PetForums VIP

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    Health is just one factor in many that should be considered. Health, Tempermant and Conformation will all be considered by a breeder aiming for something from a litter..To me none more important than the other.
    Health testing is a good way, in making sure your dogs are of good enough health to breed on from and not cause problems for off spring and the breed (although its not always guaranteed!) - but health testing alone does not equal a decent breeder! :)
     
  5. SophieCyde

    SophieCyde PetForums VIP

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    ah ok :) thanks :eek:
     
  6. Colette

    Colette PetForums VIP

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    I have nothing to do with breeding either, but in my personal opinion.....

    All of those things (heath, temperament and conformation) are important and a good breeder will look for all three. Anyone leaving one of those out is not going far enough IMO.

    Health testing for me is probably the most important of the three, because it has the most obvious, direct impact on the welfare of the pups produced.

    Temperament should also be a concern - especially as so many dogs are dumped, destroyed, or get thir entire breed a bad reputation as a result of behaviour / temperament problems. Not to mention the potential risks to people (eg of being bitten). I do believe that breeding from dogs of questionable temperament is inexcusable. The only reason I would put this a close second to health testing is because you can to a certain extent work with temperament (the whole nature versus nurture debate). Wheras if your dog suffers with one of those hereditary disorders there may be nothing you can do. (Hop that makes sense).

    Conformation and working ability are reason breeds exist, so without them breeding is fairly pointless.

    I also think these things are linked to the other two - for example, dogs who's "working ability" includes running agility courses or similar sports are likely to be very fit in order to do so (therefore healthy in that respect), and dogs who's working ability involves something like Schutzhund / working trials must have sound temperaments.

    From what I've learned on here, conformation is linked to both ability and heath, so is also very important - even for those with no interest in showing.

    Just my two pence - hope it made sense.
     
  7. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    As has already been said, they are all equally important.

    I have frequently said that I would rather breed from a reasonable bitch with an around average hipscore and a superb temperament than a fantastic specimen with excellent hipscores and a temperament like a cantankerous old bat.

    Breeding should always be about trying to improve (or at least maintaining) conformation, temperament and health.

    Health tests are tools which should be used to guide us, not the sole reason for breeding -

    Conformationally, few dogs are perfect, most will have faults, even if they are small, and sometimes well hidden with a good handler - so this 'concept' that only the best should be bred from is an idealistic and unrealistic view - there are many dogs in kennels who for various reasons may never see the inside of a showring or retrieve a pheasant yet produce offspring with far superior conformation / capabilities to themselves.

    If we only bred from 'the best' - it would do nothing for any breed - if we remove recessive carriers it could kill some breeds off altogether (even numerically large breeds) and the idea this could be overcome by interbreeding between types or cross-breeding is, with few exceptions a complete nonsense and will, long term, only serve to increase the health issues within breeds / crosses.

    I know there have been a few recent instances of admissions to some breeds and crosses within breed types - but it is clear that the thought, effort, time and campaigning that goes into making these work and be accepted is quite possibly beyond the comprehension of nearly everyone bar those directly involved.

    Breeding should be about attempting to improve in all areas - as with anything to do with nature and science - it doesn't always work - all we can do is our best.

    Of course, if we could stop PF and BYB - we would quickly move a long way towards tidying up the dog world before we even start looking more closely at what could be done to benefit existing breeds.
     
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