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A few more queries

Discussion in 'Cat Breeding' started by megancb123, Jan 3, 2020.


  1. megancb123

    megancb123 PetForums Newbie

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    1. How many times should you let your queen breed a year? Should you let your queen have a rest after a year of breeding?

    2. My Sire is marking a lot in the hall way floors and anything that you may leave lying around. (I try not to leave anything out) He is not spraying up the walls or vertically. He does use his litter tray, but often weeing outside of it. Is there anyway to control this?

    3. Do you need to feed your queen any different food while she is pregnant? My queen is currently on a raw food diet.
     
  2. Lolanme

    Lolanme PetForums Newbie

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    A stud needs more than one queen to keep him happy at least 3-4 girls, entire males will smell and spray, only a lucky few dont and he wont get better now he has, he will only get worse if he only got one girl, you should get him neutered as they can become aggressive and frustrated with not enough girls.

    If you dont know what food you should be feeding your pregnant female then thats a worry, that sort of thing should be researched or discussed with the breeder you bought your cat from, they should be mentoring you, you decided to breed your girl and its basic knowledge if you have research into good breeding ethics.

    Is your queen and stud registered with the GCCF or other Organisations on the Active?, have they been DNA tested clear for their breeds health concerns so there not passed onto there kittens? Will you be early neutering the kittens before they go to there new homes so as not to encourage BYB.

    A litter once a year for a queen is best so she can get her full health back, there is exceptional circumstances, but the queens health is always put first.

    Sadly theres too many people breeding there cats with no intention of showing or improving the breed or the health, doing researching etc...thinking they can make money at the detriment of there pets, disapointing
     
    moomoowawa, chillminx and Rufus15 like this.
  3. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    1. There is no single answer as cats are individuals. If she has recovered bodily condition and calling I'd mate her if she got pregnant easily, delivered without a big fuss and was a good mother. If not I'd be thinking about spaying her. But I wouldn't be breeding her every 9 months for litter after litter. When she has given me the girl to replace herself with, it's time to spay her. Letting a cat call & call without mating her can lead to lots of problems.

    2. That's what entire boys usually do - they mark and spray. This is why most people in the UK keep studs outside in heated stud houses, with an outside run. Using the Suprelorin chip is becoming more popular, it chemically castrates a boy in some cases for over a year.

    3. If the raw food is complete why would she need anything different?
     
  4. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    1. The rule of thumb is 3 litters in 2 years. If you can stretch to a year between litters then that's ideal, but if the queen is calling hard and losing condition then it's best to mate her.

    2. Studs tend to spray, for this reason many live out in stud runs. Clean where he has sprayed with a bio washing powder and one of those blue light things to make sure you've got it all.

    3. If the raw is complete then no.

    It is concerning that you don't know the answers to these basic breeding questions
     
    moomoowawa likes this.
  5. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    Associations have varying guidelines or rules on litter spacing. One litter per year is not always healthy especially breeds that call year round.

    Housing studs is not alway easy, which is why new breeders tend to use outside studs until they're more experienced and also have enough girls, some breeders never own a stud.
    Novice breeders shouldn't be jumping into stud ownership.

    Piddling boys (and girls) need appropriate housing.

    Our cats are raw fed, they just eat more frequently when pregnant or nursing.

    Depending on breed, not just DNA gene tested but heart scanned as well.
     
    OrientalSlave likes this.
  6. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Also I've no idea what you breed. I breed oriental shorthair and DNA test the colour where it's not possible to know what the kitten is carrying. For example if I breed my chocolate girl who carries cinnamon & dilute to s deal carrying cinnamon but not dilute, I'd be testing kittens to ensure I kept a dilute carrier, and a cinnamon carrier if was looking at keeping a black or seal kitten. All chocolate or choc pt kittens would carry cinnamon.

    However chocolate and cinnamon might not be something you have to worry about.

    Sadly no DNa tests for silver or caramel, so plenty of misregistered cats around
     
  7. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    This is a huge problem in Maine Coons - there are some breeders across Europe who will sell blue solids with an unsound coat as blue smoke. Very frustrating
     
  8. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    And vice versa, I imagine
     
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