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4-weeks-old/need some advice

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by tc.catz, Jun 11, 2010.


  1. tc.catz

    tc.catz PetForums Member

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    Our kitty is now 4 weeks old and mum has let the folk near enough to sex the kittens. Our little munchkins is a boy. Oops - I had picked all girls names:D Another four weeks and he can come home:p

    Sooooo, what do I need to get in for our new addition, ,list please folks.

    Thank you
     
  2. lillylove

    lillylove PetForums Member

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    I think personally for me apart from the basics - litter tray/bowls - heavy non slip - and I put mine on a tray as its easier for mess than a 'flat' mat/safe toys/food/litter etc, the thing I had to do was kitten proof my house. She got behind the sofa and used it as a toilet, got behind the fridge and wouldn't come out... look for the little gaps where you don't want them to go and cover them up temporarily. Move anything like blind cords, things they could chew on and hurt themselves, little things they could potentially swallow, move it all up very high or in a secure box. You could make little snuggly corners in places they may like to go while little. Then when they get older they choose their own places.

    Oh, biological washing powder/liquid. Tesco do a value version very cheaply. Its worth having it indoors always just in case of a toilet accident!
     
  3. IndysMamma

    IndysMamma PetForums VIP

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    chamomile tea to relax with as you get ready to throttle a kitten that wants to play at 4am...

    5 different style beds... all of which will be ignored
    ditto for 300+ small toys
    a scratching post/tree that will never compare to the sofa
    2 litter trays - hopefully will find one in time
    plasters (kitten claws are *sharp*)
    a bag of patience

    :p

    seriously... tray, food/water bowls, a bed if you like or blanky and a selection of cheap toys and a scratching post...

    how old will he be when you get him?
     
  4. lillylove

    lillylove PetForums Member

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    lol at the beds and posts... yep, never used. But the understorage boxes under my bed are always used at 4am to play inside!
     
  5. tc.catz

    tc.catz PetForums Member

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    I had planned to get him at 8 weeks however was reading another thread on the forum and see that 10-12 weeks is better? He was born in a private cat sanctuary so now I am wondering if it would be better to let them keep him for a few more weeks, what do you all think? I need to know really as I booked my holidays to co-incide with when we get him so would need to cancel them. I would rather get his right than wrong. Years ago you never got a puppy under 10 weeks and more often than not 12 weeks!

    Many thanks
     
  6. tordis

    tordis PetForums Senior

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    If it's possible, let him stay with his mum until he's 12 weeks old, he will benefit from it.
    Oh, and when he's home, we want pictures. Loads of pictures :D
     
  7. dharma66

    dharma66 PetForums Senior

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    8 weeks is 'ok'.
    10 weeks is 'good'
    12 weeks is 'great'

    After seven weeks, kittens generally start what is known as 'object play', and cut down on 'social play'.

    Social play is absolutely critical to a kittens social development, not just with other cats, but with all species, including humans. A kitten separated from it's mother before 8 weeks will not have learnt how to get along with others, so it's good that you are talking about 8 weeks and not less.

    Object play is designed to hone the kittens survival skills, including hunting. This is not sense to be as important as social play, and so 8 weeks is often considered perfectly acceptable, with many rescues rehoming at this age, partly to cut down on costs, I'm sure.

    However, during this period there is another process going on that is important, and that is the severing of the bond between the kitten and it's mother. The mother will have been startling to withhold feeding from about six or seven weeks, but will still occasionally allow the kittens to feed for a couple of weeks after this. Eventually, she gets to the point where she completely refuses to feed, and she starts to take less interest in cleaning and so on. The kittens find this frustrating,a and coping with this frustration is an important lesson in their early life. Also, at 8-10 weeks there is still a bond between mother and kittens, and so there will be some separation anxiety if the kitten is removed at this time.

    As I said, 8 weeks is considered fine by many rescue organisations, and if there is no alternative, you kitten will be no worse off than the vast majority of moggies, and much better off than those we hear about that are homed at six or even five weeks!

    The Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (which sets the standards for pedigree breeders) recommends that kittens should be at leapt 13 weeks. However, there are some logistical reasons for this as well as welfare reasons. Kittens should get their first round of vaccination at about 9 weeks. The booster then follows three weeks later at 12 weeks, and it is then recommended that the kittens are not rehomed for a further week, to reduce stress, and to give a little time to see if they have an adverse reaction to the vaccine.

    That's a lot of waffle, but what it amounts to is that if you can wait until 10-12 weeks, you are likely to have a happier cat!
     
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