Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

2 year old dog with Cataracts

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Barry Moore, May 26, 2018.


  1. Barry Moore

    Barry Moore PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm hoping someone can give me some advice, I have a small 2 year old dog with a Cataracts, I have him registered under the PDSA as I'm disabled and on benefits, The pdsa have told me they don't treat or operate on Cataracts, Neither does the animal hospital or bluecross, I'm so distraught as the surgery is around £3k which I don't have, Does anyone know any charities that would help us, We live in East London, Thanks in advance for any advice,
     
  2. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    7,718
    Likes Received:
    1,033
    I can't help unfortunately, I am out of touch with benefits, have you tried Credit Union I appreciate this may not be an option. Some private vets will offer payment terms. Whilst it pains me to suggest it, have you thought about giving him up to a good rescue who will treat him before rehoming him.
     
  3. foxiesummer

    foxiesummer PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Messages:
    3,313
    Likes Received:
    1,970
    Is that price for both eyes. I ask as they only usually do one eye. My beagle had an eye removed due to glaucoma and a cataract on the other one and it was 3k. We are upt north however so probs not as expensive. What about crowd funding.
     
  4. Barry Moore

    Barry Moore PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    1
    hI, i've found a place the queen mary hospital for animals that will do it for £2,500 and its just one eye.
     
  5. Barry Moore

    Barry Moore PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    1
    I would never put him up for rehoming, its appalling what these vets charge, they have you over a barrel.
     
    sskmick likes this.
  6. foxiesummer

    foxiesummer PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Messages:
    3,313
    Likes Received:
    1,970
    It isn't just the initial cost but the ongoing treatment and check ups. My beagle had her op three years ago and has regular check up. She is at the moment on 6 drops twice a day of three different medicines.
     
  7. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
    Messages:
    7,718
    Likes Received:
    1,033
    When a cat of mine required an expensive operation, our vet gave me a quote of £3,000.00 in 2010 which included all post operative treatments and check ups. After six months he then suggested any further treatment be paid for. I didn't expect the treatment to be free after the initial prescription.

    Tammy was neutered/spayed 27 April 2018 all her check ups have been part of the initial fee, we have had to pay for antibiotics and now anti-inflammatory tablets, this is due to complications. She is booked to have a further operation on Friday, if necessary.

    You are right they do hold us over a barrel, and vet fees are expensive, however I look at it that we are paying for their expertise, no-one is going to go to University, study veterinary care to end up on the minimum wage, we also expect them to have state of the art fully equipped premises.

    I will add in the early 80s I had a dog under veterinary care for a severe skin condition costing £26.00, a fortnight wages were approximately £50.00 a week. I wasn't working at the time as I had a young child. Hubby left me and I ended up taking the dog to the PDSA. They gave me the same tablets, but no shampoo, nor hair/fur restorer that I got from our private vet. The PDSA vet asked if everything was alright, and I told him what treatment I got from our previous vet. He said what shampoo do you use for your son, it was Johnsons baby shampoo and he said I could use that on the dog. He asked if I was planning on showing the dog in the next few weeks, I wasn't - then I didn't need the hair restorer.

    I am pleased to hear that you are determined to keep you dog and help him. I would do the same.
     
    DaisyBluebell likes this.
  8. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2008
    Messages:
    26,625
    Likes Received:
    16,838
    You say Cataracts so I take it both eyes are affected, could you not have one eye done at a time so pay for the one and later have the done.
     
  9. Barry Moore

    Barry Moore PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    1
    My dog is under the PDSA, He has skin allergies and the PDSA told me to put him on Specific CDD-HY, within 10 days off being on this food we noticed the white cloud in his left eye, after a few weeks the white cloud was really noticeable in his left eye, I took him back to the PDSA, They informed me it was a cataracts. Three days ago we took him off the Specific CDD-HY and now the white cloud looks like its fading. I think it was the food all along and not a cataracts.
     
  10. foxiesummer

    foxiesummer PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Messages:
    3,313
    Likes Received:
    1,970
    They only usually do one eye. Then there is the aftercare. My beagle is on 6 eye drops (3 different types), twice a day and six monthly checkups.
     
  11. Jason25

    Jason25 PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    May 8, 2018
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    797
    If i was in your position i would set up a just giving page and share your story on social media websites.

    Hope you get it sorted mate, good luck to you and the pooch
     
    DaisyBluebell likes this.
  12. shirleystarr

    shirleystarr PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    8,350
    Likes Received:
    2,268
    Lucy my 13 year old dog has cataracts we went to a specialist vet who told us they would do one eye first but also said its not always successful and then she told us that if lucy was her dog she would not have it done that was 6 years ago and you would never know she is blind she runs around the house and the garden like a puppy our local vet said dogs have an internal map in the head as to where everything is so long as you don't move any furniture which she would bump into you would never know there was anything wrong with her
     
    DaisyBluebell likes this.
  13. ShibaPup

    ShibaPup PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2017
    Messages:
    1,309
    Likes Received:
    3,147
    Vets aren't expensive in the grand scheme of things - if we had to pay for our own medical care I don't think we'd be too shocked by vet prices.

    It's the wages, rent, utility bills, medications, equipment etc.. it all adds up. Vets try to help animals, they don't join that career as a get rich quick scheme - I imagine it's just as difficult for them when their hands are tied and they feel responsible or helpless, they can't give out free treatments to everyone.
    To give payment plans legally - I believe they have to be a part of a financial group or something.

    My advice would to be either start saving and putting money aside each week/month OR look into lifetime insurance, from a company known to pay out such as Petplan, they don't hike up prices massively each year which is great! Be aware about pre-existing conditions and anything on her records that she's previously be treated for will be considered a pre-existing condition and not covered. You will also have to pay so much of each claim for me it's the first £75 but it can vary depending on the age of the dog.
     
    MontyMaude and lullabydream like this.
  14. DaisyBluebell

    DaisyBluebell Earth, the insane asylum of the Universe

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2017
    Messages:
    4,156
    Likes Received:
    5,963
    My vet told me Daisy had caterers in both eyes & they would usually only do one at about £3k if they got worse. We did nothing rather than put her in for an operation. She never seemed bothered about them & contined to run about with no problem at all unless you came up on the sides of her. She continued without problems for another 6 years till we lost her at 17.
    A few years later I looked into cataracts as I had been told I have them but they may never developed, which 6 years down the line they haven't, but whilst checking out cataracts I came across a condition, whose name now escapes me, in dogs that is in fact not cataracts but clouds the outer rim of the iris giving the impression of cataracts & makes no difference to the sight of the dog directly only peripherally, which I now realise is what Daisy must have had by her continued ability to make no difference to her. I'm not saying this may or may not be the case for you but its worth not panicking too much on the immediate diagnosis & see how thing do or don't develope.
    I will see if I can find the info again & put on this site for future reference or maybe one of our more knowledgeable members may know something about it.
     
    Barry Moore likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice