Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

2 pups from same litter?

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by pearltheplank, Apr 5, 2011.


  1. pearltheplank

    pearltheplank PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,325
    Likes Received:
    15
    What are everyones thoughts on having 2 pups from the same litter in one household? From a buyers point of view as well as a breeders. Several breeders I know will not let 2 go to the same person, yet others do
     
  2. I intend to keep 1 or 2 back from my litter.

    I have however seen first hand what happens with 2 pups being raised together by a first time dog owner and it was not pretty.

    I think it would depend on how much experience with dogs they had as well as their ability to give time and attention to both individually.
     
  3. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    5,443
    Likes Received:
    770
    As a buyer - the smallest gap I would have is one year. Ok, I have working/competition dogs so demand a much higher level of training than the average pet, but a) I do not have the facilities to keep two pups separate (they live in the house) which would be required so as not to develop too close a bond with each other and b) I do not have the time to spend training two pups individually as well as the other dogs together.

    As a breeder - no I would never unless a very experienced working/competition home that I knew personally.
     
  4. Carla-Jade

    Carla-Jade PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,843
    Likes Received:
    41
    i have 2 pups form same litter but they are living apart for half the time- the evenings they sleep at seperate houses
     
  5. Kinjilabs

    Kinjilabs PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    11,081
    Likes Received:
    381
    My friend when she bred kept two from most litters to see how they went, never had a problem at all:D
     
  6. Devil-Dogz

    Devil-Dogz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    6,157
    Likes Received:
    206
    Alot, well most decent breeders will not sell two puppies to the same home. I totally agree with this, and we would not do it either. Raising one puppy is hard enough, the time and effort put in to raise a well adjusted pup. Puppies from the same litter tend to depend on each other alot more, or dislike each other - either way its not good when you are trying to bring up happy puppies, and bond with them yourself.

    I see no reason why anyone would need to buy two puppies at the same time either. Although it will be different for a show/working breeder that keep more than one and run them on for a while before making a choice ect!

    I tend to find that most breeders that will sell to a pet home more than one pup at the same time are only after the cash.

    If someone likes a certain breeders puppies so much, they can always go back ideally a year later for another.
     
  7. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    5,443
    Likes Received:
    770
    Or is struggling to find homes for them and so will sell potential buyers two littermates. Not always, but often these buyers started off intending to only buy one, but get persuaded by the breeder to take another (unsold) pup.
     
  8. Ahh nice to hear. :)

    My goal is to keep possibly two blue's back. But as I told my OH I am not impartial to a tri or two either.:tongue_smilie:
     
  9. Kinjilabs

    Kinjilabs PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    11,081
    Likes Received:
    381
    Do you think its a "family" thing?
    I had two pups, not related but 2 weeks between them in age that lived together till 14 plus with no problems:D
     
  10. This was the problem with the 2 sibling dogs I met. They were so dependent on eachother that they didnt listen to the owner. They played up. If 1 played up the other would join in so the owner felt more pressure.

    In the end they attended training classes (silly enough, together) so they played up throughout the class until the trainer kicked 1 out and said they must come after the other had completed.
     
  11. Devil-Dogz

    Devil-Dogz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    6,157
    Likes Received:
    206
    I personally do think it could be due to growing up with them..Spending the 8/10 weeks with breeder together.. But of course I have no proof of that :p
    I have no doubt that in an experienced home, owning two litters mates could work but on avarge its not something a good breeder will risk :)
     
  12. rocco33

    rocco33 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    5,443
    Likes Received:
    770
    There will always be people who say they have had littermates and had no problems. The reasons why are numerous. Most of the replies on forums (obviously not yours) reveal that the dogs of people who have littermates and have had no problems are still puppies of very young dogs, so a bit premature ;).

    I think some people like the fact that they rely heavily on each other for company as it takes the pressure off them as owners to entertain/train the dogs.

    The problems of 'littermate syndrome' are very real, but many pet owners would be unaware of the signs. Frequently they will say one is submissive and one bossy, failing to realise that this masks the insecurities that the dogs have by growing up so dependant on each other.

    The littermates may never be put in a position where they will be uncomfortable enough to have to act.

    I remember a case some years ago. Two labrador littermate bitches. Owner never had any problems, both family pets with great temperaments. One day one of the bitches got stung and reacted badly. Owner tried to get to the bitch that was very distressed in the garden. But, the littermate was stressed and would not let the owner near her injured littermate - and in fact, bit her owner to protect the littermate. This was a normal loving family pet that had never displayed such behaviour but being put under the duress, chose to protect her littermate over her own owner.
     
  13. lilacbabe

    lilacbabe PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2009
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    12
    Got 2 JRT sisters from same litter then month later got My Airedale they are now 7 years old and have never had any problems .

    Would need a lot of time for them though but I think its ok to have littermates .:)
     
  14. dexter

    dexter PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Messages:
    6,255
    Likes Received:
    108
    Don't do it unless you are VERY experienced. i made the mistake years ago of selling 2 syblings to same home and one came back a year later as she was dominant over the other.
     
  15. Freyja

    Freyja PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Messages:
    10,281
    Likes Received:
    795
    I think it depends very much on the breed and the experience of the new owner. I have let 2 pups go together to experienced homes with no problems at all but with whippets they do seem to do better when there are 2 than 1 on its own.

    I have litter mates in the twins yes they are very reliant on each other or rather Simba relies on his sister to give him confidence Amber on the other hand is very confident. They have both bonded with me ask anyone at the shows who had treid to take them away from me. I can take them out one at a time and with a different dogs so although close they do have seperate times Amber though is quite jealous of her brother he is so laid back if was was more laid back he would be liying down all the time:D
     
  16. Blondie

    Blondie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    6,237
    Likes Received:
    133
    Its usually a no-no from me as a breeder to sell two litter mates to the same home, but then, it depends on the individual circumstances. I would have to know the potential owner previously and know they could cope, the last thing I would want is to have one of them returned to me to re-home coz they couldnt cope or similar. They would need to have lots of experience of the breed for a start!
     
  17. Rolosmum

    Rolosmum PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2010
    Messages:
    2,765
    Likes Received:
    23
    Speaking as someone who has two pups three months apart in age, (at 6 and 9 months respectively), the 6 month had bonded with us already from 9 weeks old and the other is a high bonding dog by nature, so both have bonded well with us.

    BUT although we are loving it, they are loving it and we love the decision and having two, it is harder in that they do follow each other around and you have two heads in with you when you are trying to do stuff sometimes which can be frustrating especially if they decide to play over your head.

    I can imagine that with two very small pups as part of a pet home where you dont want to literally keep them segregated it would be hard to focus them to bond with you and to train and behave separately. Ours were both trained from a young age separately and had all basic commands before living together, but even now if one is tempted to break a stay the other may copy. So if you are teaching a stay then it must be harder and require a lot of separate time and a big restriction in their play and free access to each other , which for pet dogs to me makes it a little pointless in getting them.

    Maybe if there are a husband and wife both actively involved and it becomes in effect your dog/my dog scenario it is easier, I have my husband around all day every day and if need be we have crates to separate.

    But it would be very hard to manage puppy nipping and household manners for two dogs at the same time, I think.
     
    #17 Rolosmum, Apr 6, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
  18. Shenty

    Shenty PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would say it depends on each individual situation - if the buyers are experienced dog people and are well and truely clued up to just how much hard work it can be, who know the pro's and con's of having two, and have the time to put in the work I can't see why not?

    We have two sisters from the same litter which are 9 months old now and it was the right decision for all involved - on our part we knew what we were letting ourselves in for and there is no denying that you need support from your family to take an active part in bringing each of them up if you want a well rounded adult. If it was a single person I would say no, but if it was an experienced couple or a family I would say yes

    I think it is also the responsibility of the individual breeder to vet the potential owner as I'm sure many do - we spent practically the whole day with the breeder while she got to know us and keep in touch with her to let her know how they are getting on

    Our two both have individual personalities and the only time they find each other more interesting than us is when they wrestle with each other - but when they were growing up we spent alot of time with each of them which I think has helped

    So I think there are those out there who are suitable for two pups, and then there are those who aren't
     
    #18 Shenty, Apr 6, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2011
  19. tiddliewink

    tiddliewink PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2011
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    My opinion (from a breeders point) is it depends on 1) the breed, 2) if you think the pups will be ok. Most times it is prob not a good idea but occasionally it has worked out just fine.
     
  20. Ducky

    Ducky PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    4,349
    Likes Received:
    65
    personally, i would never want two puppies at the same time!! one is hard enough hehe.

    there is only 7months between my two, and that was still really quite hard work.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice