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18 week pug puppies

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Annie charlton, Feb 13, 2019.


  1. Annie charlton

    Annie charlton PetForums Newbie

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    Hello. I need some advice. I have 2 pug puppies that I bought at 12 weeks old. They hadn't had any injections so for the last 6 weeks went put down on the ground. On advice from my vet
    I did however take them everywhere with me they met l9ta of people lots of sounds smells etc and lots of other dogs all be it in my arms. Now the problem I have is when I take them out for a walk they barf excessively at other dogs jump all over them and the little girl (esme) sou d's like so.eghing is trying to kill her she squeals and whines so bad. I take them out at least once a day. They are friendly little things love people and children. House training is going well. But I'm at a loss as to what to do with other dogs! Cookie (the boy) isn't as bad but with bark then have a sniff then bark but once esme starts all hell breaks loose!! I have a video some where as a bit of an example will try and upload it
     
  2. BlueJay

    BlueJay Made of bones

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    Are you walking them together every time?
    Walking them separately won't immediately fix the problems, but will allow you to focus on one without the other egging them on. It is very important that they learn to cope and behave individually as well as a pair
     
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  3. Annie charlton

    Annie charlton PetForums Newbie

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    Hello thank you for your reply. I only occasionally walk them separate. The make dog walks well on his own. The female is even more afraid on her own.
     
  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    You might want to do some research on littermate syndrome.
     
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  5. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    So do it more often. Let Esme know you'll keep her safe by turning away from any dog she starts kicking off at, and removing her from the situation. There will be a distance at which she feels safe; sit somewhere with her where dogs are passing by at distance and keep her attention on you by using treats. Over time, the distance can be decreased. She will not build her self confidence if her brother is always there to hide behind.
    Puppy classes may help too, as she should be able to be in the same space as other pups and young dogs where they are under control and no threat to her, but if she finds it too stressful it would be better not to go. And do research litter mate syndrome. How your dogs develop as individuals will depend on how well you understand it and can make changes to get them on their way. Most breeders won't home a pair together; good ones certainly shouldn't.
     
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  6. Annie charlton

    Annie charlton PetForums Newbie

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    I have been reading about littermate syndrome.. I've read mixed articals.. They aren't super attached to each other when at home. They love playing separate and often sleep in separate beds. It's just walking out..

    The breeder I got them off mentioned nothing about homing them together. She said alot of people actually buy 2???
     
  7. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    They may not stick together like glue at home, but they will be aware of each other's proximity and be accustomed to having the other close at hand. I have litter sisters that I bred, so their mum's there too (plus another dog for the first 3 years). I originally only planned to keep one but I came to love another so much I couldn't part with her so I kept her too. But I was aware of the issues that can arise and did separate walks and training with them from the days when I'd carry them tucked into my coat, even before their first jabs. For my girls, it has worked out without any problems, they are both naturally quite confident characters. The only blip I had was that Flossie wouldn't participate in puppy class unless Fly was there too, for the first few sessions - I had been going to alternate them.
    A lot of people your breeder sells to may well buy 2, but that doesn't mean it's in the best interests of the dogs or their new owners. The work in raising 2 at the same time is more than double that of raising one, for a start. You have to train everything individually with both as well as together; house training is more difficult as you won't necessarily know who did what, and when.
     
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  8. Annie charlton

    Annie charlton PetForums Newbie

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    Bit of an update. So I've been taking the puppies out separately every day. Cookie the boy loves it bouncing around the park. Esme is growing more confident. She lets other dogs sniff her now then gets all excited and comes straight back over to me for a fuss.
     
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  9. niamh123

    niamh123 PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like things are improving keep up the good work:)
     
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