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18 month old house trained dog decides to pee in house sometimes..?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Cajones49, Aug 25, 2013.


  1. Cajones49

    Cajones49 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi

    I have a full pug dog (Charlie) who is 18 months old

    I also have a 5 month old pug bitch (Daisy)

    Just before I introduced Daisy into our family, Charlie our placid and well behaved teenager decided he would sometimes pee in places where he never had before.

    Normally he could be left, or if in would indicate he wanted to go out by heading to the back door.

    However, this peeing cant be fully related to Daisy as it was before her arrival, as I could kind of understand it being her as a trigger.

    It's not always the same place, table leg, sofa, side of door, other half's Xbox! And it's not always when he's left for a few hours. Sometimes it can be we pop out for 10 mins and he does it. Sometimes he does it in front of us and sometimes at night. We can go weeks without an episode, and I think he's grown out of it, then he'll leave me some pee to clean up.

    Daisy is good as expected for a bitch 99% housetrained with perhaps a confused accident every once in a while.

    He doesn't pee on the spots where Daisy has had her accidents.

    So, when we are out is the issue. Daisy is crated but Charlie's crate was removed about 8 months ago.

    My first thought is we integrate him back to the crate lifestyle, although I know he will miss his window seat.

    Any thoughts or suggestions are gratefully received. Also to clarify he's a full dog as we intend our pug family to grow.. As I'm sure castration will be a suggestion.

    Many thanks
    Cheryl
     
  2. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    I'd have him checked over by a vet just to be on the safe side and then look at newtering him.

    Newtering does not all ways solve the problem but it will give him less to worry about.


    I would certainly keep them seperate if their both entire and definately consider spaying the bitch to avoid any accidental litters.
     
  3. Werehorse

    Werehorse PetForums VIP

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    Go to the vet and get him checked for a UTI or similar issue. As soon as possible, they can turn nasty quickly. :(

    I would think long and hard before breeding any dog but particularly pugs, a breed riddled with health problems due to their extreme conformation. Unless you are making a sincere consciour effort to breed for more moderate conformation and better health ( which seems unlikely when just using the two dogs you have under your nose but forgive me if I am wrong! ); unless you are doing that my opi nion is that just breeding a pug without this purpose at the forfront is highly unethical.

    And I'm usually quite relaxed about breeding.
     
  4. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    I'm sorry but were does it mention the owner wants to breed? Bit rude to assume >.>
     
  5. Dogless

    Dogless PetForums VIP

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    Here...........

     
    Werehorse likes this.
  6. Picklelily

    Picklelily PetForums VIP

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    I think you possibly need to look back and see if anything changed at the time he began doing this.

    Wash the areas where he has been toileting with a solution of biological washing powder to get rid of any scents that may tempt him to use that area again.

    Take a really close look at your routine on the days he is doing this is anything different?

    Finally go back to basics and perhaps train him to pee on command that way you know it isn't because he had a full bladder and was desperate to go.

    I had this problem with my rescue going completely back to basics was the cure for us.

    Personally I wouldn't breed a pug without expert advice the health issues involved are massive and you could end up with some rather hefty vets bills. However should you choose to go ahead please get all the relevant health tests and expert advice on the airway and palate formation on both of your pugs before breeding. It would be very easy to end up with puppies that can't breath or have cleft lip and palate. Pugs despite their increase in popularity aren't an easy dog to breed from due to the massive health issues within the breed.
     
  7. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

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    Castration will cure it. Breeding pugs is not something an amateur should do.

    Charming username :rolleyes:
     
  8. Cajones49

    Cajones49 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone

    Thank you for your replies.

    I'm not sure what to say really, it seems that I made comment about wishing to breed and its assumed that I wouldn't check the dogs over with the vets, understand the risk and it seems there is condemnation around breeding two pugs.

    I love my dogs very much and they are first and foremost part of my family. They are separated when I am out and supervised when I am home. There will be no accidents.

    If I thought that my bitch would be at risk 'or more risk' than any other pug, it wouldn't happen. And, to be honest, she is small anyway, so I probably won't want to risk it.

    I accept that people are passionate about responsible breeding. I just wonder if people recognise that some people who are in love with this breed may wish to become one of those breeders. Not everyone is out for a quick buck.

    Anyway, I'll try the cleaning as suggested and re-training to go on command. If there's no improvement over the next couple of days I'll take him to vets to be checked.

    Cheryl
     
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