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14 Week old Kitten with intermittent diahorrea

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by JessicaBailey, Jul 11, 2018.


  1. JessicaBailey

    JessicaBailey PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,

    My 14 week old kitten Bailey has been on the lidls cosida pot kitten food since weening as that is what the breeder feed him and I wanted to continue that until he was settled. Upon talking to my vet and doing research I made the decision to start feeding him felix as good as it looks pouches. I made the change over with food slowly about 4 weeks ago as I didn't want to upset his stomach. He really likes them but I have noticed he has diahorrea. I would say he goes about 3 times a day and at least one of these is runny. Because of it being not every time I thought maybe it was a particular flavour wasn't agreeing with him ? (either chicken, tuna, salmon or beef). But finding this out will take sometime and I just wanted to know other pet owners opinions ? He does have a small amount of dried food which he loves but only gets it as a treat/snack. Has anyone else had a similar problem ? He seems absolutely fine in himself and has no other issues.
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hello @JessicaBailey and welcome :)

    A kitten on a wet food diet pooing 3 times in 24 hours, with one of his poos runny, does indicate his diet is probably not suiting him.

    Felix As Good as it Looks (AGAIL) is not the best food for kittens. It contains quite a high percentage of vegetable protein (soya) which is indigestible to cats because they lack the right enzyme to digest it. It also contains grains, which not all kittens can tolerate, and they can suffer a loose stool.

    The other thing is that ALL flavours of Felix AGAIL contain beef, so there is no point in trying to work out which of the flavours might be causing the diarrhoea. There are much better, more nourishing wet foods for kittens than Felix AGAIL.

    I am not familiar with Lidl cat foods, but if you could post a list of the ingredients I can tell you whether it is a good food or not.

    However, most supermarkets "own makes" of cat food tend to be a copy of the cheaper proprietary brands (such as Felix) and as such are no worse, sometimes they are even better. So it is possible the Lidl's food you were feeding him was better for his tummy than the Felix.

    Better quality wet foods for kittens are : Natures Menu, HiLife The One Chicken, Lily's Kitchen, even Wainwrights. But to get good quality foods at more reasonable prices it is best to buy canned food on line as many of us forum members do.

    From Zooplus, I suggest: Grau Kitten, Feringa Kitten, Animonda Carny Kitten, Bozita Kitten, Macs Kitten. These makes all contain meat protein, (no vegetable protein) and are grain-free.

    http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/cats/canned_cat_food_pouches

    Meanwhile, to settle his tummy, take him off all cat food (wet and dry, including treats) and instead for a couple of days feed him only home cooked chicken drumsticks with plenty of the cooking juices (stock). If he doesn't like chicken, then give him poached white fish and plenty of the stock. Either of these foods will settle his tummy.

    Feed him this bland diet for a couple of days until he is producing formed poos every time. Then gradually reintroduce the cat food (but not Felix), alongside his chicken or fish, so the change is not too sudden. The bland diet rests the bowel.
     
  3. JessicaBailey

    JessicaBailey PetForums Newbie

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    Honestly I'm a bit perplexed by the amount of cat food being sold that pet owners say are no good. I stopped feeding Bailey the Coshida food as my vet said that the container it came in (a foil tray ) causes long term thyroid damage ! And the only food he could recommend costs an absolute fortune !

    Thank you very much for your suggestions and I will investigate them more and hopefully sort out my little ones tummy. If i'm being honest when picking food I was looking for the protein and fat content. I appreciate your helpful information about vegetable protein and I will be looking at that from now on as well.
     
  4. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Common sources of aluminium to which cats are exposed include food that has been in aluminium cans, or aluminium foil trays, or the foil insides of pouches such as those containing Felix.

    Although it is questionable as to whether exposure to aluminium has a direct effect on thyroid health, there is documented evidence that aluminium exposure can affect the parathyroid glands, and might suppress the release of parathyroid hormone. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is important for bone health
    and health problems that cause too little or too much PTH to be produced can cause bone disease, hypocalcaemia or hypercalcaemia.

    Aluminium is a neurotoxin and a strong immune stimulator, and is still commonly used in vaccines.

    You would need to feed your cat a home cooked diet, or raw diet, with added supplements, and not have him vaccinated, to avoid him being exposed to a low level of aluminium in daily life.

    Thyroid disease (Hyperthyroidism) is a disease which affects a percentage of senior cats. Research has not shown conclusively what the causes may be.
     
    #4 chillminx, Jul 11, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
    Mrs Funkin likes this.
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