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13 yr old Viszla with Laryngeal paralysis op or PTS

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Esther Mander, Mar 13, 2021.


  1. Esther Mander

    Esther Mander PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Frankie my WHV is 13 and has had a rough few years, he had aspiration pneumonia about 18mths ago and then severe constipation and now he has suspect LarPar. He is booked in for a £3k op on Monday but i just don't know if this is the right decision. I know nobody can make the decision for me but I am struggling because even though he is old i do think he is still strong and potentially healthy, even after all his problems, the main issue now is he can't breath hence the op. But, the risks are high in the recovery period and it may only give him another 6mths maybe a year as he is at the upper end of his life span and could be strewn with complications afterwards and the nerve degeneration will progress so even if he can breath he might end up not being able to walk. Will the op hasten his decline given all the risks or will it give him a better chance at a full life for the time he has left? I know these questions are all unknown in terms of answers but has anyone else done this kind of thing on a very old dog? what was the outcome? was the recovery hard and did it improve their life significantly enough? Am I just putting of the inevitable for my own sake? He seems so alive and engaged it just doesn't seem like he is ready to go, but will an operation place too much strain on his system for him to ever get over it? I have been think this through since friday and i am coming round to the conclusion that he needs to be PTS but i would love to hear from anyone else who has had a similar dilemma?
     
  2. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    No experience of the condition but my own sighthound is around 13 and I wouldn’t put him through a tough surgery and recovery tbh
     
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  3. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    It's a hard decision to make, but think about his quality of life rather than quantity. If you think he only has 6 months left and that's filled with recovery and stress is that any life? Whereas a few days (or weeks, I'm not sure what the prognosis is for LarPar) on painkillers and meds to give him a great life for a short period might be enough for you to come to terms with it.
    It's completely your decision, and you know your dog best. Can you chat to your vet or even just a family member or good friend about it to get another perspective?
     
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  4. Esther Mander

    Esther Mander PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for replying, he is booked in for surgery but i have been thinking over the weekend and after reading lots of forums of people who's older dogs 13/14yrs have had the surgery and they a littered with a cocktail of drugs and have had some significant complications, that PTS would be kinder. Frankie, my dog, who is on steroids for potential inflammation of this throat, at home seems ok he can get up on his chair, up and down the stairs, out in the garden, and eats and drinks ok. His back legs are weaker than I would like but they do seem strong enough atm. He does have arthritis and maybe the steroids are helping with that so he seems better than he actually is. i would be absolutely devastated if i put him through this and he just gets worse in terms of leg function and activity. Conversely he could pull through with no issues and continue life ok for another year maybe 2 but at 13 for a 30kg vizsla this seems unlikely. Even though he's not at deaths door and hasn't shown me any indication of saying it's time, another thing lots of forums say happens, perhaps it's time to let him go with dignity before all the potential pain he might suffer. As you say a difficult decision and his quality of life would be great if he could breath but the surgery could bring on a whole host of other problems which means his quality of life would not be much improved from now when he can't breath. Do you PTS when they still seem ok but you know it's a progressive decline potentially exacerbated by surgery or wait until they can't function. i know the answer, it's just good to get it all out, helps me think it through as well. Thanks for your time and responses
     
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  5. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    It’s the hardest part of having and loving our animals, but I’m sure if they could speak they would thank us for saving them from suffering.

    Always someone here to listen and offer support too.

    Take care x
     
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  6. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    How bad is his breathing and how long has it been like that?

    My old boy had mild LP which affect him every time he woke but after a while he learnt to deal with it and stopped panicking

    I'd let them go before they suffer too much
     
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  7. Esther Mander

    Esther Mander PetForums Newbie

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    I think looking back that he has had mild LP for about a year and it's now progressed, so although he is more or less ok at home he can't come for walks, can't make it past the front gate without struggling. I put his breathing down to the aspiration pneumonia but i think he recovered from that and had mild LP following. It is soul destroying because i know he would keep going with a good quality of life if he didn't have this. I also have a little JRT who is 17 and very ill, she doesn't have much quality of life and it's worse if she is off the pain killers. I knew it was time soon for both of them but i just didn't imagine they would go at the same time. They have both had an amazing life and it is sad to see them like this, not doing anything but the basics of life. I've cancelled the surgery for Frankie and i will book them both in at the end of the week to cross over together. I think in some respects the difficulty is mine because as human we are afraid of death and it's perceived finality. The dogs will probably be relieved to be free of pain and suffering. I don't wish this situation on anyone but I'll will be ok as I know deep down that it is the best for them, and ultimately it is what we sign up for when we take a dog into our lives. I have a 4yr old collie who will make sure I still get out on walks. Apart from my ex MIL's cat it's the first time I have had to help a loved pet cross.
     
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  8. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    You know your dogs best and how much they are struggling.
    I'll be thinking of you
     
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  9. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like the best plan.

    I’d let the other dog see and sniff them once they’ve passed so they can understand what’s happened, rather than they just vanish from the family which could cause confusion and upset for them.
     
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  10. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    I feel for you. It's a horrible situation but you have thought it through and it sounds very sensible. As you say the dogs don't know what's going on, it's much harder for us than it is them. I find the process of putting them to sleep very peaceful, it's not a horrible experience, but of course it's afterwards that grief hits. Please be kind to yourself.
     
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