UK Pet Forums Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The breeder of my 11 yo lab is going to live overseas and he had two dogs that I took over because they were old no one wanted them and i felt sorry for them. one is a 12 yo lab thats deaf and is like a bulldozer! I expect he was living outside, quite neglected and has no manners.

My problem is that both my 11 yo lab and this 12 yo lab are males and both are competing to dominate. its been three days and they are still at it and neither will submit to the other. they run themselves down destabilize the other dogs and I am running out of options.

Do I have any hope of training a deaf half blind 12 yo lab and what can I do to stop this "fighting" for domination. When Im with them they behave because they know whos the boss but the moment I leave its rather bad.

I need some help!

thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,811 Posts
The breeder of my 11 yo lab is going to live overseas and he had two dogs that I took over because they were old no one wanted them and i felt sorry for them. one is a 12 yo lab thats deaf and is like a bulldozer! I expect he was living outside, quite neglected and has no manners.

My problem is that both my 11 yo lab and this 12 yo lab are males and both are competing to dominate. its been three days and they are still at it and neither will submit to the other. they run themselves down destabilize the other dogs and I am running out of options.

Do I have any hope of training a deaf half blind 12 yo lab and what can I do to stop this "fighting" for domination. When Im with them they behave because they know whos the boss but the moment I leave its rather bad.

I need some help!

thanks
3 days isnt that long really. How bad are they fighting, is it all noise and posturing and growling, or full on fights maybe causing injuries even if minor.
If they are OK when your around and it is all handbags and noise then it may be salvageable considering the short space of time too.

Being deaf and partially blind thats not likely going to help. He has been brought on an exisiting packs territory and also being deaf and partially blind may be making him even more defensive and bolshie.

If dogs are going to compete and kick off then the usual common triggers as well tend to be food, toys, treats especially things like chews and bones, attention, confined spaces and times of hyper excitement like visitors coming, door bells ringing and leads coming out for walks.

On the food front maybe best to either feed him on his own at the moment, or give him his forever place/ postion to eat, maybe separated by a dog control gate or away from the others and supervised. No eyeing up each others bowls, approaching each other when eating, even the empty bowls, make sure bowls are picked up and put away, and they have a few minutes separated until they have supervised access to each other again.

Obviously you need to be wary of dropped food human and dog, that both going for could cause a squabble.

Chews treats toys etc dont leave lying around only give supervised and make sure they have a good margin of space, again no eyballing allowed or approaching each other.

Attentions often another trigger, so I wouldnt fuss either when they are together or not at the moment.

When they are in confined spaces like narrow hallways, where one has to pass close by that can cause problems too where one has to pass or jump over the other. Some dogs will deliberately displace others and block them in too especially if its a confined area. Or stop them getting thorugh doorways and access to water bowls etc. Trying to get through doorways at the same time can set them off too.

Again times causing hyper excitement can make them more reactive when they are in a heightened state of arousal it can lead to barging and snapping that will start it off.

You need to be aware of subtle body language as well, like eyeballing, making eye contact and staring each other out, stiff body posture etc that can be a subtle challenge.

Obviously dont leave them unattended without supervision at the moment separate them when you cant watch them.

Taking them out for walks is often good especially if there are two of you often spending time on neutral territory is good because they tend to not compete as they do on own turf so its a way of getting them used to each other. If one or both is crate trained and you have a heavy duty dog crate thats another way of getting them to get used to sharing space without no fear of squabbles and in safety. Other things you can do it have them both on lead and under control so again the can get used to sharing space. Or having one or both on a house line for control.

Depends how bad they are fighting though, but by avoiding known triggers, getting them out for walks and to mix on neutral territory and also using crates/dog control gates and leads and house lines while you are trying to integrate and get used to each other may help or certainly worth trying, as said 3 days is still pretty early days. Are they both entire (uneutered) if they are that may not be helping either especially if you have entire females as well. You may need to watch them at season time if you have entire females as well as males who are often OK can start to compete over bitches in season.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top