What diet for urinary problem

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by RaquelSousa, Apr 11, 2012.


  1. RaquelSousa

    RaquelSousa PetForums Junior

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    Hello! As I said in my presentation, I came to the UK in December. I had 3 cats back in Portugal, and I'm now considering bringing my best friend Lee.
    About a year ago he started peeing with blood and stopped eating. Apparently he had crystal formations in the urine. The vet said we had to feed him special food AND ONLY that food. Royal canin Urinary S/O in Portugal. The thing is, there are a lot more brands here. What diet would you advise? Which brand? Dry, wet or both? And do you think some treats would harm? Thank you in advance =)
     
  2. jo-pop

    jo-pop PetForums VIP

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    Hi, I have no experience of this myself but the main thing I wanted to say is that you need to be feeding wet. Wet wet and more wet, no dry.
    I am sure someone else will be able to advise further.....
     
  3. Tylah

    Tylah PetForums Member

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    I've just consulted my book:

    1) Urine in carnivores eating meat is acid not alkaline. Dry food causes your cat to have very alkaline wee. This is not how it should be and leads to inflammation.

    2) Dry food provides almost no moisture, whereas prey (mice etc) would have 80% moisture. Cat's don't have much of a thirst for water and this leads to a dehydrated cat with very concentrated urine. Unnaturally high minerals in the urine causes UTIs.

    3) If you cat will eat wet food, his urine will return to a normal PH level, and crystals and stones will no longer be a problem.



    So no more dry, feed only wet and the UTIs will go away.
     
  4. Tobacat

    Tobacat PetForums Senior

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    You probably know you can get Royal Canin s/o cheaper online. I can't give advice over other brands, but obviously make sure a different one is for the management of his type of crystals. Hills may do one?

    The general advice is to give cats with any kind of urinary problem wet food -not sure if he's having the dry or wet version.
     
  5. RaquelSousa

    RaquelSousa PetForums Junior

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    He's been eating ONLY urinary dry food for a year. Followed the vet's advice, now I understand he was wrong. According to him, wet food causes diarrhea...
    So shall I feed him wet food special for urinary problems? Like this one? http://www.zooplus.co.uk/shop/cats/canned_cat_food_pouches/hills_prescription/186263

    Thank you for the answers!
     
    #5 RaquelSousa, Apr 11, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  6. Clairey1234

    Clairey1234 PetForums Member

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    hiya.
    my cat is also on a special diet.
    he needs to be on hills s/d for the same thing you are describing!

    i was also told to stay clear of dried food.
     
  7. MontyMaude

    MontyMaude PetForums VIP

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    Personally if the Royal Canin S/O food is working for him then I would stick with it, as crystals can be fatal.

    Where is DB as she has a cat on S/O and I think she gives him a little wet food each day.
     
  8. havoc

    havoc PetForums VIP

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    What exactly do manufacturers have to prove (if anything) to say that a particular food is a specialist diet? These things hold no license and aren't listed on NOAH. Do companies like Hill's and RC have to submit these 'special' diets for any sort of independant scrutiny?
     
  9. RaquelSousa

    RaquelSousa PetForums Junior

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    I'd like to know that aswell in fact, gonna give it a search.
     
  10. havoc

    havoc PetForums VIP

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    Hill's call their products 'prescription' diets and RC call theirs 'veterinary' diets but we all know they are not prescription products and don't have to be purchased through a vet though vets do tend to recommend/sell one or t'other.

    The claims are usually that a particular food is low in X or high in Y. What I'm interested in is whether this just means lower (or higher) than in their other products or is at a level scientifically proven to make a significant difference and cannot be replicated without buying a prepared special diet.
     
  11. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    http://www.hillspet.com/media/_refa...anagementofFelineLowerUrinaryTractDisease.pdf
    Read this link for information provided by Hills themselves!
    ( thanks to the PF member who originally posted this recently )

    Secondly, it is possible to buy products containing Methionine ( sp? ) which acidify the urine. I know I saw a palatable paste in Pets at Home containing this ingredient and for this purpose, cost around £6.
    Obviously consult with your vet before making any changes.
     
  12. havoc

    havoc PetForums VIP

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    Thanks for reproducing the link. I knew I'd read it somewhere but hadn't bookmarked it. I am, as much as anything, interested in whether vets take a holistic approach or if they see selling a special diet as the easy answer. For example, there's little argument that increased fluid intake is good but can it be as good in a hard water area as a soft water one? Do owners spend a fortune on these special foods just to cancel out much of the differences in them by encouraging the cat to drink more if you live in a hard water area? Would something as simple as filtering work to reduce the levels of minerals to avoid the problem in the first place? There are sometimes specified amounts of these minerals considered necessary for feline health and included in processed catfood. If too much isn't good is it worth considering other sources which could be simpler and cheaper to control?

    Lots of question marks because I honestly don't know the answers, I really am asking.
     
  13. Tobacat

    Tobacat PetForums Senior

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    If you do decide to change to another brand, make sure it covers dissolving struvite crystals/stones and has acidifiying properties which is what Royal Canin s/o does.

    By the way, Royal Canin do pouches (meat in gravy) and tray (pate meat) which are wet products. Can be ordered online.

    When changing over food, is advised to slowly change over so either a small amount of the new one on it's own or mixing both the current dry and wet together. This reduces the chance of tummy upsets as the body can slowly adjust to the new diet.
     
  14. RaquelSousa

    RaquelSousa PetForums Junior

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    Thank you all for the help! I guess I will be changing to hill's c/d slowly. You'r all awesome :cornut:
     
  15. Austin

    Austin PetForums Junior

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    In short, yes, that food would work perfectly. When my oldest was diagnosed with a blocked bladder, after emergency treatment he was sent home with Royal Canin S/O and Hills S/D, both wet and dry varieties. I was advised that wet was best, but they gave me both brands and types in case he refused to eat one of them and so I could find what he was happiest with. At the time it was a nightmare getting him to eat wet food at all as he was addicted to the dry food another vet had previously insisted was best for him, but I persisted, taking it away and covering it with clingfilm until he begrudgingly ate the Royal Canin.

    I gradually shifted him over to the Hills because it was a lot cheaper; he's been eating a half and half mix of the Hills C/D dry (which can be fed on a long term basis - Hills told me the '6 months' recommendation is just legal-speak that the EU insist upon) with Kattovit Urinary canned food (which does the same thing but is cheaper still). He's been eating this since he was a lad, and he recently celebrated his 10th birthday, so yes, the Hills prescription food works very well! :)
     
  16. RaquelSousa

    RaquelSousa PetForums Junior

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    Thank you! Kattovit really seems like a good option! Is the Kattovit dry food for urinary problems any good comparing to Hills C/D?
     
    #16 RaquelSousa, Apr 14, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012
  17. Dragonlady

    Dragonlady PetForums Member

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    I would like to ask your vet how all cats managed to survive thousands of years without prescriptions/veterinary/dry diets.

    Ok, cats tend to live much longer today but it's not because of all commercial prescription food. Our attitude has changed and cats are not left alone to catch mice but they get food from us. If they get ill, we go to vets and treat them. They don't die early of bites infections because we castrate our pets... And there are more reasons.
     
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