umbilical hernia

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by amy_lou_79, Feb 22, 2008.


  1. amy_lou_79

    amy_lou_79 PetForums Junior

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    My dog had a litter of puppies nearly 12 weeks ago. All the puppies have been rehomed apart from mine.
    I have found out that three of them have a umbilical hernia? Can someone tell me some more information about it and what causes it as I am a bit concerned to why 3 of them have it.
     
  2. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    What breed are they? Did you supervise the whelping?
     
  3. amy_lou_79

    amy_lou_79 PetForums Junior

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    The vets nurse delievered them at the surgery. They are shih tzu's.
     
  4. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    Reading back through some of your posts you were considering taking them for their first jabs, we have had only a couple of hernias here which were caused by a first time mum being slightly rough when trying to sort out the cord but they were not bad ones and actually disappeared in time!

    Found this have a read


    A hernia is a protrusion or bulge of a part of the body tissue, fat, or an organ through an abnormal opening of the surrounding tissues. There are numerous types of hernias, each type named after its affected area.


    A hernia which can be pushed back into the abdomen is called reducible. Hernias which are not reducible are called incarcerated. If the blood supply to an incarcerated hernia is pinched off the hernia becomes strangulated. A strangulated hernia is an emergency situation and must be brought to the immediate attention of your veterinarian.
    Some of the most common types of hernias are:
    Umbilical hernia
    An umbilical hernia is the most common type of hernia found in puppies. In the case of umbilical hernias, a portion of fat or internal organs protrudes through an incompletely closed umbilical ring. Umbilical hernias may be present at birth, or may be acquired. The most common means of acquiring an umbilical hernia is as a result of the umbilical cord being severed too close to the abdominal wall.
    In most cases umbilical hernias are small and reduce as the puppy grows. Generally, by the time the pup is six months old the umbilical hernia will shrink and disappear on its own. If the pup has a large hernia, or one that can be pushed into the abdomen with a finger, consult your veterinarian regarding possible surgical repair.

    Inguinal hernia
    An inguinal hernia is the result of abdominal organs, fat or tissue protruding through the inguinal ring. Inguinal hernias are presented as skin-covered bulges in the groin. They can be bilateral, involving both sides, or unilateral, involving only one side.
    Inguinal hernias are more common in females than males, but do occur in both sexes. As with umbilical hernias most inguinal hernias will shrink and disappear as the puppy grows, although you must keep an eye on the size of the hernia(s).
    Inguinal hernias can also occur in unspayed, middle-aged female dogs. This may occur as the result of stretching of abdominal tissue due to pregnancy, or atrophy of abdominal tissue and musculature due to advanced age.

    Diaphragmatic hernia
    A diaphragmatic hernia is the result of a tear in the diaphragm which allows abdominal organ portions to pass into the chest area. The most common occurrence of a diaphragmatic hernia is following an accident. If the tear is small, there may not be any obvious clinical indications. If the hernia is significant, however, there are indications such as strained respiration, lack of appetite, difficulty swallowing or vomiting. If a large portion of the abdominal organ have passed through the diaphragmatic tear the dog tends to stand with an extremely "tucked up" abdominal area.
     
  5. amy_lou_79

    amy_lou_79 PetForums Junior

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    So could it be down to the vets nurse cutting the cords to short?
     
  6. BlackCat

    BlackCat PetForums Member

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    From the cord being cut to the mum vigouroulsly cleaning may be a cause but the hernia being a result of a hereditary defect is generally more likely.
     
  7. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    Wouldn't like to say but did they not check them over ??????
     
  8. amy_lou_79

    amy_lou_79 PetForums Junior

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    Yeah they did.
     
  9. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    Did they also have a vet check before leaving for their new homes
     
  10. englishrose943

    englishrose943 PetForums VIP

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    Hi there i have shih tzus too and 2 of mine had the hernias on the last litter to. It doesnt cause them any discomfort and can uuslly disappear in time if not to bad.
    Michelle
     
  11. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    One of the old time things was to tape an old penny over the hernia to help support and then hopefully to 'disappear'
     
  12. englishrose943

    englishrose943 PetForums VIP

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    these old wives tales usually worked to.
     
  13. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    biggest problem was trying to make sure puppy didn't take it off and swallow it I would have thought :eek: :eek:
     
  14. englishrose943

    englishrose943 PetForums VIP

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    :rolleyes::rolleyes:Oh god eah never thought of that. I was just thinking hw did they manage with poorly animals in the war as there wasnt the vets like we have now or orums like this:rolleyes:
     
  15. amy_lou_79

    amy_lou_79 PetForums Junior

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    Thing is you don't expect to pay all that money for them to end up having problems do you.
     
  16. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    No you don't, but I very much doubt that it's the vets fault,I wouldn't imagine that the nurse cut the cords too short or pulled at them.I would say that it's more likely to be inheredited.
     
  17. amy_lou_79

    amy_lou_79 PetForums Junior

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    Hope so. Just one of the owners told me that her vet said its down to who delievered them.
     
  18. sallyanne

    sallyanne Guest

    I would say thats an assumption to be honest as most hernia's are inheredited.I really can't see how they have come to that conclusion.
     
  19. nici

    nici PetForums Senior

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    i agree one of my girls had an umbilical hernia and when i asked at the vets about it they said that it is not caused by pulling at the cord it is hereditary
     
  20. tashi

    tashi Super Moderator
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    here it is
     
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