Quorn

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Happy Paws, Jan 8, 2017.


  1. Vanessa131

    Vanessa131 PetForums VIP

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    1.2 grams of salt per 500g of quorn mince. 1.55g of salt per 500g of beef mince.
     
  2. noushka05

    noushka05 lefty,remoaner,bunny-hugger, giver of a ****

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    hahaa I did say 'should' & 'somewhat' :p
     
  3. Phoenix Rising

    Phoenix Rising PetForums Senior

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    I like quorn mince in bolognaise, chilli's as I don't really like beef. I like lamb but its expensive and can't afford it all the time, so its an occasional treat when I find it on offer at half price or something.

    I'm trying to cut down on red and processed meats too as I do like a cooked breakfast at weekend. I don't mind quorn sausages but can't stand the bacon. I just occasionally treat myself to a small pack of bacon for a couple of butties or cooked with mushroom, onion and tomatoes (chopped) with pasta twists! ..though I'm trying to lose weight so no more bacon as a treat until I've lost a stone!
     
  4. Lexiedhb

    Lexiedhb Team Ginger!

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    Quorn, horrible texture, horrible taste, I'd rather just have veg - if I were a veggie
     
  5. Ant C

    Ant C PetForums Newbie

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    It must just be the peppered steaks i seen at that then, oops
     
  6. Ant C

    Ant C PetForums Newbie

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    Still nasty products lol
     
  7. Muttly

    Muttly Fluffy Mutts Rule!

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    Yum! I love Quorn. I eat the Sausages, burgers, bacon, mince. But will only eat the chicken in something like a curry, it's rank in it's own :Wtf

    I eat them because they are healthier and nice.
     
  8. KatieandOliver

    KatieandOliver PetForums VIP

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    I've recently started cooking classes and can reliably cook stew and risotto - I'm so surprised that I really love experimenting with different vegetables. My sisters boyfriend is vegetarian so I made a couple of vegetarian dishes for him over Christmas - I didn't use any quorn or meat alternatives at all. I have used quorn at school in Bolognese which was quite nice, and I've just relearned how to make Bolognese so I will give it a go :)
     
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  9. Ant C

    Ant C PetForums Newbie

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    Theres nothing healither than a real piece of juicy meat. It's all about where you get your meat from (Never buy from a supermarket). Mycoprotein can be toxic to your body
     
  10. Muttly

    Muttly Fluffy Mutts Rule!

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    I still eat plenty of good meat :)
     
  11. Jesthar

    Jesthar PetForums VIP

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    A lot of them are - just in terms derived from Old French, not English, which is due to the Normans conquering us in 1066. So we have the following derivations:

    'pork' - Old French for 'pig'
    'beef' - Old French for 'ox'
    'bacun' - Old French for 'back meat'
    'mutton' - Old French for 'sheep'

    Those would have been the 'upmarket' terms used in court for the meats, whilst the natives would still use the Old English terms for the animals themselves.

    Steak, on the other hand, appears to come from the Old Norse word steikja or steik, meaning a thick cut of meat for roasting.
     
    #31 Jesthar, Jan 10, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
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  12. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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    Nothing healthier? Not much unhealthier apart from dairy. Artery-clogging, plaque-plugging and cholesterol hiking animal protein, animal cholesterol and animal fat. The building blocks of chronic diseases. Plaque - a waxy, fatty deposit that can build up in various places in the body including the inside of the arteries. Over time this plaque grows greasier, more fatty and nastier and can become so thick that it constricts the flow of blood which can completely close off the arteries triggering a heart attack (or the plaque can burst spilling out its gel to form a clot), stroke, erectile dysfunction etc etc. For good health and vitality ditch the animals and bring on the plants :)
     
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  13. Ant C

    Ant C PetForums Newbie

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    I don't know what meat you eat but everything i eat is 5% or less fat. Redmeat can be bad depending on the cut BUT things like chicken & turkey are probably the healthiest meats.. :lol:
     
  14. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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    I don't eat any :) You may be interested in this from The Starch Solution by Dr John McDougall.

    "All Animal foods provide essentially the same nutrition and have roughly the same impact on your health. It doesn't matter whether you grill meat that comes from a cow, pig, sheep, lamb, or chicken or scramble eggs from a chicken or a duck or drink milk that comes from a cow, goat or sheep. These foods are so similar they are essentially equivalent as far as nutrition is concerned. Animal foods are made up of large amounts of protein, fat and cholesterol, with high levels of the sulphur containing amino acid methionine and dietary acids.

    Beef Chicken Cheese Eggs Beans Rice Potato Sweet Potato

    Protein 37 46 25 32 27 9 8 7

    Fat 57 51 74 61 4 8 1 1

    Cholesterol 32 36 26 272 0 0 0 0

    Methionine 268 335 162 251 98 66 50 41

    Dietary acid 6.3 7 10 8.2 1 1 -5 -9

    Note - Protein and fat are expressed in percentage of total calories. Cholesterol and methionine are milligrams per 100 calories. Dietary acid is renal acid load per 100 calories (a negative number means the food is alkaline).

    When we take in methionine the body metabolizes it to homocysteine which is a known risk factor for heart attack, stroke, arterial diseases of the legs, blood clots in the veins, depression and dementia. Sulphur is also thought to feed cancers and is known to be toxic to the tissues of the intestine causing colitis. We eventually metabolize sulphur containing amino acids into sulphuric acid which is a potent dietary acid which is thought to dissolve bones and cause the kidneys to produce calcium based stones."

    Hope that is enough to be going on with but I can provide more if required :)

    oops sorry it doesn't like my table and has squeezed it all up together - I'm not clever enough to do a proper table/graph so hope you can decipher it.
     
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  15. rockdot

    rockdot PetForums Member

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    Brilliant question! I've wondered the same thing and also wonder why a vegetarian/vegan product is marketed as if it were meat.
    I'm a meat eater that also eats the quorn products, if I were vegan/ vegetarian, would I really be drawn to eat a product that pretends to be meat? not sure I would to be honest.
     
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  16. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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  17. Ant C

    Ant C PetForums Newbie

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    Thats the most horse crap i've ever read in my life..

    Things like bacon etc are bad for you & processed meats.

    Anything pumped full of water, drugs & hormones isn't good for anybody..
    Just be careful to where you buy meat from is what i say.
     
  18. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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    Which particular bit is horse crap? The nutritional analysis? the known and proven by research health problems?

    Processed meat is indeed "not good for you" its a Grade 1 carcinogen (World Health Organisation).
     
  19. rottiepointerhouse

    rottiepointerhouse PetForums VIP

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    Some more horse crap for you to enjoy (my bold)

    The bacteria that inhabit our gut digest food and produce metabolites that can have a marked effect on the heart and blood vessels. Researchers have found that measuring the levels of a molecule called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) that is produced by the gut bacteria from components of red meat, eggs and diary products in blood could give them a quick and reliable way of assessing the risk of death and other major heart problems in patients who arrive in hospital emergency departments with chest pains.


    Furthermore, TMAO levels could predict this risk not only in the short-term (over the first 30 days) but also the risk of death in the longer term (up to seven years later).

    The study, which is published today (Wednesday) in the European Heart Journal, found that TMAO levels also predicted higher risks of serious heart problems and death even in patients who did not have a protein called troponin T in their blood - a protein that is released when the heart muscle has been damaged, for instance during a heart attack. Measuring for troponin T is one of the standard diagnostic tests that are carried on patients with suspected heart problems.


    The findings suggest the possibility of helping patients to reduce their risk by trying to reduce TMAO levels in two ways: through a change in diet or by designing new drugs that prevent TMAO being produced.

    Previous studies have shown that higher TMAO levels are associated with blood clots (thrombosis), by helping platelets to form clots quicker, and with inflammation of blood vessels. Higher TMAO levels in heart disease patients have been shown to predict the risk of thrombosis, but, until now, it was not known whether TMAO levels could predict the risk of thrombosis, other heart problems or death in previously healthy people arriving in hospital emergency departments for the first time with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) - a term that includes a range of heart problems from angina to heart attacks.

    Researchers in Switzerland and the USA examined TMAO levels in the blood of 530 patients, aged over 18, arriving in the emergency department of the Cleveland Clinic (Ohio, USA) with chest pains, and 1,683 patients who had coronary angiography within five days after being admitted to one of four university hospitals in Switzerland (Zurich, Bern, Lausanne and Geneva) with chest pains. The patients were followed up for several years to monitor for outcomes such as death from any cause, death from heart and blood vessel problems, heart attack, stroke or revascularisation (a procedure to re-establish blood flow to the heart or blood vessels) - collectively termed "major adverse cardiovascular events" (MACE).

    Professor Thomas Lüscher, Chairman of Cardiology at the University Heart Centre, Zurich, Switzerland, who led the study, said: "We found that the Cleveland patients with higher TMAO levels were more likely to experience a major adverse cardiovascular event at 30 days, six months and seven years after their admittance to hospital. After adjusting for risk factors such as age, smoking, diabetes cholesterol levels and blood pressure, when compared with patients with the lowest TMAO levels, those with levels in the top 25% were around six times more likely to die, suffer a heart attack or stroke or require revascularisation at 30 days and six months, and nearly twice as likely to die within seven years.

    "Interestingly, even in patients who did not appear to have elevated levels of troponin T when they first arrived at hospital, those with the TMAO levels in the top 25% still had a nearly six-fold higher risk of a major adverse cardiovascular event.

    "In the larger group of Swiss patients, those with the highest TMAO levels had a 1.5 times higher risk after one year, after adjusting for other risk factors. Possibly this is related to different dietary habits of Swiss and US patients.

    "This study shows for the first time that TMAO levels are associated with both short and long term risks of death and other cardiovascular problems among patients coming to hospital emergency departments with chest pain and suspected heart problems. We think that rapid TMAO testing could now contribute to the identification of higher risk patients, with the potential to speed up the time between initial evaluation and cardiac catheterisation. This could help salvage more of the heart muscle that is under stress, as time is muscle."

    The researchers say that TMAO levels also suggest new ways to reduce the risk of further heart problems and death. Co-author, Dr Slayman Obeid, junior consultant at the University Heart Centre, Zurich, said: "TMAO offers a better understanding of the clinical impact that our daily diet has on the cardiovascular system, specifically in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. This opens the way for new preventive measures, such as encouraging patients to switch from a diet rich in red meat, dairy products and eggs to a Mediterranean diet rich in green leafy vegetables and fibre. In addition, drugs could be developed that target the process by which bacteria in the gut interact with food to make TMAO. So, in the future, interventions that reduce TMAO levels may help to reduce the risk of clots and blocked arteries."

    In both groups of patients, those with TMAO levels above 2.5 micrometres (1 μm = 1 millionth of a metre) seemed to be at higher risk. However, after adjusting for other risk factors and medical conditions, the increased risk was seen to start at 4.28 μm in the US patients and 4.85 μm in the Swiss.

    Testing for TMAO is quick and easy to perform in the laboratory and is inexpensive - in the USA hospitals can carry it out for around $50-55.



    Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-01-quick-blood-gut-bacteria-death.html#jCp
     
  20. Phoenix Rising

    Phoenix Rising PetForums Senior

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    Where are the studies that show it is toxic to the body?