Please help, I feel scammed!

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by Breadcrumbs, Jun 18, 2017 at 7:13 AM.


  1. SpicyBulldog

    SpicyBulldog PetForums Member

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    It's the common way to do it. Though if you're not careful about the breeder it is easier to get scammed with distance and not having seen the pup in person or maybe their is no pup at all, some people take money for non existent litters. You need to look into responsible breeder even if you will be meeting the litter, as bad breeders lie and could still rip you off.

    I've not seen a contract like that, I generally see that the pup will be in good general health and free of communicable diseases and then whatever specific genetic disorders. Some I've seen however are not what i see as ideal like only guaranteeing against crippling hip dysplasia or guaranteeing against it for only a small number of months.
     
  2. cows573

    cows573 PetForums Senior

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    Have you tried threatening the breeder?

    In my experience, court action only benefits lawyers...

    Bad references all across the internet may be more effective... or the threat of that!

    Alternatively... would you be willing to rehome the puppy, even if it isn't perfect for the price you haven't been returned? I dread to think what might happen to them if they are a breeder of bad repute....
     
  3. Siskin

    Siskin Home redistribution system

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    Up until I bought Isla I had never put a deposit on a puppy that I had reserved. Isla's breeders asked for a deposit as they had been messed about in the past and needed a firm commitment. It was only something like 10%.

    Can't speak for everyone, but my norm is to go and see a litter of puppies, decide whether I want one or not and tell the breeder this. At usually five to six weeks you either choose or the breeder selects a puppy for you and at this point a deposit (if required) would be paid. Then you wait until the day you finally pick up the puppy to bring home and pay the rest of the money.
    These days it will be cash or direct bank transfer, cheques have a habit of bounceing so no longer accepted.

    Due to being a smaller country it's easy to drive to see a puppy more then once, I visited the breeders of Isla about four times prior to bringing her home. There are plenty of people breeding golden retrievers therefore travelling distances are normally quite small, however if I was looking for a rare breed or a dog from particular lines then it could be that I would have to travel to Europe and then, I suspect, it would be very different. There are a few on the forum that have imported dogs from Europe who will have a different story to tell
     
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  4. Sweety

    Sweety PetForums VIP

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    That is how Backyard Breeders stay in business, when people buy the pups because they feel they're rescuing them.

    What would be fair about rehoming a pup when there is the possibility of a real problem with the eyes?
     
  5. SpicyBulldog

    SpicyBulldog PetForums Member

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    I see, that makes sense. If you're able to drive and meet the breeder and see pups throughout the process that would eliminate a good part of the worry. I've driven anywhere from very short distance to over 30 hours, but also had pups shipped ground or air.