My dog is aggressive to every person and dog it meets

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Ojivar, Apr 19, 2017.


  1. Ojivar

    Ojivar PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all

    As the title says I have a problem with an aggressive dog.

    Me and my partner have 3 dogs, the smallest of the three is the problem.

    He is a jack Russell x pug x Pomeranian.

    The problem is that whenever we are on a walk he wants to attack any dog he sees, he grabs his lead and tugs and pulls on it. If he is off the lead and we accidentally bump into another dog he will run around the dog barking, snarling and nipping.
    Today on a walk he was off the lead and we saw someone we knew and their dog, knowing that the other dog has always put mine in it's place and the owner always says let him off as he is better off the lead we didn't grab him.
    He ran straight up to the owner, grabbed his trousers and then nipped his leg (luckily his mouth is too small to really bite). He then ran up to the other dog acting aggressive, the other dog pinned him to the floor which at least stopped him.
    If any person gets close to us on a walk he will snarl and bark and do the lead grabbing thing (costing me a fortune in leads!)

    In the past I have had two different behaviorists who have been unable to help.
    He will not even take treats when he gets riled up so cannot train him away from this behavior.
    He has a muzzle but his nose is so small even the smallest one is too big and when he wears it he will claw at it until he gets it off or his paws bleed.

    In the house he is the most well behaved of the three dogs as long as no one he doesn't know is around.

    I am at a loss of what to do with him. Obviously the worry is he will bite someone or another dog and cause injury.
    We also have 2 cats and he is not fussed about them in the slightest.

    I know this stems from fear and I suspect it relates back to when he was a puppy and went missing for 4 days. He is 5 years old now and doesn't seem to be growing out of it.

    Anyone got any thoughts or suggestions on what I can do to train him out of this behaviour?

    Thanks
     
  2. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

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    Definitely don't let him off the lead if he's doing that....he could end up getting seriously hurt by a larger dog. He won't grow out of it either. If the behaviourists you saw couldn't help you at all they can't have been very good ones.

    You are not going to be able to ever fully trust a dog that is a fear biter of people and dogs as you can't change his personality. However you can manage him better by trying not to put him in the position where he's able to bite people and harass other dogs. So, lead up unless you are completely sure of your environment and can't get caught out. And find a decent behaviourist who can write up a behavioural modification plan for him.
     
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  3. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell PetForums VIP

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    Yeah, I have to agree that he should never be off-lead. You should have control of him all the time. One day he may well meet a dog that won't just put him in his place but will seriously hurt him. At his size it wouldn't take much of a shake to snap his spine.
     
  4. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Keep him on a harness and long line and don't allow him to practise this behaviour. He sounds anxious and fearful of other dogs to me and people to me. If other dogs have been "putting him in his place" that won't have helped at all.

    His behaviour could get him (and you) in trouble under Dog Law.

    Try walking him on his own sometimes so you can give him all your attention for training and work out the distance from dogs/people at which he doesn't react and praise/reward.

    Look at positively.com and Kikopup for some training tips.

    What sort of things did the previous trainers suggest?

    He needs positive, reward based training. Anyone suggesting alpha/dominance training should be avoided.
     
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  5. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    You cannot let this continue, he needs to be on a lead to prevent him practising this behaviour & to keep people & their dogs safe.

    He is not able to eat or to focus on you as he is over threshold & unable to respond to you. If you are doing any sort of training/behaviour modification it is vital you keep him under threshold & work at a distance he is comfortable at.

    First off I would see your vet,get him checked over to rule out any physical complaint. Where do you live ? Maybe someone could recommend a behaviourist for you to contact.It is very difficult for you to do this yourself as environmental issues (people & other dogs) are not always able to be controlled.

    Until you are able to see someone I would advise keeping him on a lead, try going to places where you are able to see who is approaching, do not let them get too close, keep your distance & get your dog to focus on you,increase the distance if he is not happy.

    Think about what you could train your dog to do if he see other dogs:for example every time he sees another dog he turns to you & gets a reward .... or comes to sit in front of you. It may take times but with help can be achievable.

    A good book to read is 'Feisty Fido: Help for the Leash Aggressive Dog' by Karen B. London and Patricia McConne
     
  6. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife PetForums VIP

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    .
    re the muzzle, the size of his "nose" or foreface doesn't matter - the proper muzzle isn't a groomer's tube open at the end, nor an elastic mesh to hold his mouth shut, it's a BOX or basket muzzle. :)
    Basket muzzles allow a dog to pant with a wide-open mouth & thus reduces the risk of overheating; groomer's muzzles, the tubes, are potentially lethal & should IMO never be used by anyone - dogs under stress are going to pant, & without their whole airway to help cool them, they are very soon heat-stressed. Any core temp over 103'F can cause dogs to seizure, & once they seize, their body-temp starts to spike - they can die very quickly, or suffer lifelong after-effects - any sort of brain damage or organ damage U can think of, epilepsy / blind, deaf or B&D / paralysis / stroke / throw a clot / liver- kidney - heart damage / permanent loss of balance (staggers, circles), etc.
    Dogs can pant, drink by plunging the whole muzzle into a bucket [bowls are not deep enuf, they can't get to the water], & eat treats pushed between the bars. they can also be given water via a sport-cap bottle, just dribble it slowly into the flews on the side with the dog's head slightly lifted, so they can swallow it without choking. Don't squeeze the bottle, it comes out too fast - let gravity trickle it out, only squeeze lightly to "burp" the bottle & get some air in to allow water to flow again.
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    [​IMG]
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    /\ -- this one is too shallow top to bottom, & WAY-too short front to back!
    :eek:
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    [​IMG]
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    /\ -- this one, too, is WAY-too shallow & too short.
    :(
    [​IMG]
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    This is good depth top to bottom, but a little short front to back.
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    [​IMG]
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    This one's a pretty good fit, but the nose-strap is too broad & the foam padding makes it so thick, it blocks the dog's vision.
    :(

    [​IMG]
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    This is my favorite type - it's upside down, the strap that slings it above the face is at the bottom-rear. :D
    Leather straps, the loop [seen at top right] slides onto the dog's buckle collar.




    Basket muzzles can be bare metal wire, vinyl-dipped wire, or plastic - i like vinyl-dipped wire, as they're sturdy & lightweight, with a leather strap that suspends the muzzle above the dog's face, so it doesn't touch the dog's face at all but floats around it. The weight is supported by the strap connecting to the dog's tag AKA buckle-collar.
    At the front, be sure there's a gap of at least 1.5-inches to 2-inches between his nose & the inside of the basket, for his comfort.
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  7. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife PetForums VIP

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    this is a terrific example of how to properly introduce a box muzzle -
    the ACD in the clip is pretty typical, she's suspicious & wary of strangers, but note that the trainer's timing is so good, the dog is clearly happy to approach & interact with the muzzle while she's still giving the trainer stink-eye, LOL.

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    note she also doesn't chatter at the dog; she talks to the owner, but for the dog, simply MARKS what she wants, & rewards the desired action promptly after marking it. This makes for clear communication - talk less, just mark & treat. :)
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  8. Sairy

    Sairy I like big mutts and I cannot lie

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    Just to add to what other have said, you said this is costing you a fortune in leads. I'm presuming that this is because he is biting through the lead. A chain lead could be the best solution to this. I don't really like chain leads as they are uncomfortable to hold, but you can get ones that are chain at the bottom (where your dog is most likely to bite) and leather or nylon further up (where you hold). Something like this

    http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/SMALL-MED-D...RED-TAN-BLACK-HANDLE-/122299717719?nav=SEARCH
     
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  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Though if the dog wears a muzzle, biting the lead shouldn't be an issue.
     
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  10. Sairy

    Sairy I like big mutts and I cannot lie

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    Indeed yes.
     
  11. BlueJay

    BlueJay ALL the long snooters

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    Re: muzzle. You cannot just stick one on a dog and hey presto problem solved.
    Of course having something on their face is going to be alien to them; they need to be trained to accept it.
     
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  12. leashedForLife

    leashedForLife PetForums VIP

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    If biting thru leads is an ongoing issue, there's a use for a choke-chain! :Hilarious The only good use i know of, LOL.
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    Buy a double-ended spring clip: clip one end to the dog's buckle-collar or a limited-slip sighthound style martingale or a front-clip Y-harness, then clip the choke-chain to the free end - a 12-inch long slip-chain should be sufficient; clip the leash to the end ring, & yer off! :)
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    every time the dog goes to grab the leash, s/he gets a mouthful of chain, which they cannot bite thru. If the dog does succeed in reaching beyond the chain to grab the lead, a short sharp tug to get it out of their teeth puts the chain back in play.
    If they repeatedly reach past the chain to grab the lead, maintain more tension on the leash & pay strict attention to the dog during walks; don't sightsee, gab on a mobile phone, or chat with a fellow walker without watching the dog. // U can also buy a longer choke-chain of 18 to 24-inches, & swap it for the original, shorter one; so far, no dog IME has successfully lunged past 2-ft of chain to gnaw the lead in two.
    Even novice handlers paid sufficient attn to prevent their dog dodging 2-ft of chain to glom onto the lead! ;)
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    One way to foil lead-severing dogs when U stop somewhere is to use a 2-ft choke-chain, & STEP ON the leash at the clip end, giving the dog only the 2-ft of chain as 'slack'. S/he can now stand or lie down comfortably, while Ur feet protect the leash nearest them from their teeth. The rest of the leash is neatly coiled in the off-hand, away from the dog, or the coil is parked UNDER yer bum on the off-side from the dog, as U sit on a bench or chair.
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  13. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Given the poor dentition of a lot of toy breeds, this is not something I'd want to do. Their teeth could be damaged. When my collie broke a tooth, it cost a lot to repair - over £1,000.
     
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  14. Popadilly

    Popadilly PetForums Junior

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    Just looking in from the outside...if he is constantly fearful on walks and becoming very overaroused due to regularly bumping into people/dogs or anything he finds stressful...I would question whether walks are the best thing for him at the moment? As I understand it, there is evidence to suggest that it can take several days for the stress hormones to dissipate, so perhaps by staying home, using his brain, playing games, rewarding calm behaviour etc. and then keep exposure very low until you are able to find a competent behaviourist might help? If we've had a bit of an incident, I always keep the next couple of days quiet, we might go to somewhere deserted like a car park out of hours or an industrial estate and practice focus games, have a sniff of the grass verges etc.