how to stop my dog running after other dogs

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by ceforcat, Jan 9, 2011.


  1. ceforcat

    ceforcat PetForums Newbie

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    I have a 4 year old labrador retreiver and when let off the lead is very good and returns to me when called, but when she sees other dogs especially her own breed wants to play and will run after them and not come back to me unless they are unwilling to play or bark at her. Until now all other people I have encountered are fine and are quite happy as it is play time for their dogs also, and we usually have a good chat. But on my walk today she ran to another dog and i got abuse of the man and said my dog should be on a lead as she was not trained, yet his was dragging him around in circles, but it has made me think that I need to know how to stop her from running away and not coming back to me in these situations. Any help please.
     
  2. NicoleW

    NicoleW PetForums VIP

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    Practice yet more recall I'd say.

    When you're out and you see a dog, put yours on a lead straight away to avoid any more abuse.

    What I'm doing with Duke at the moment is not letting him offlead to play unless he's calm i.e. sitting down.

    I have never and will never let him run after other dogs of his own accord to play, I tell him when it's play time, he doesn't tell me. I do this by, putting him on lead when I see other dogs. If he wants to play I make him sit, take one step closer, make him sit, another step closer, make him sit etc. Soon as we get there he is sitting and waiting, I then let him off to play.

    He's 7 months old now and I've been doing this with him for 2 months, and now when he's offlead and sees a dog himself, 9 times out of 10 he comes running back to me. The only time he doesn't cmoe back is when the other dog is offlead and he engages Duke in play.

    Hope this helps
     
  3. lizzyboo

    lizzyboo PetForums VIP

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    my dog does the same, although he is only 11 months old. i have now taken to not letting him off the lead at all unless there are no dogs about, as soon as i spot one, i put him back on the lead.
     
  4. ceforcat

    ceforcat PetForums Newbie

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    I do usually put her on the lead if i see other dogs, but i just didnt see them today.
    When on the lead and we pass other dogs she always wants to say hello any suggestions to make her not so excited?
     
  5. ceforcat

    ceforcat PetForums Newbie

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    your dog is so cute
     
  6. lizzyboo

    lizzyboo PetForums VIP

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    thanks.. it sounds like you are talking about my dog lol. he freezes, tail wagging, ears alert when we see another dog when we are out walking.. then cries cause he wants to play with them!

    he met a poodle called polly (hahha) this morning.. he was just like he was n springs!!!

    i have absolutely no advise for you lol..but if you do find some, let me know xx
     
  7. momentofmadness

    momentofmadness PetForums VIP

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    I think if his is on the lead you should put yours on.. But.. sometimes they are so quick..

    It sounds like you gave this man a fright..
     
  8. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Moderator
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    Sounds like the man was embarrassed because he couldn't control his dog, so decided it was your fault. I won't let both mine go up to a dog on a lead, but it is not always so easy to catch them both.

    I would try some recall with a whistle. Get him used to hearing the whistle and getting a really good treat. Retrievers usually love food, so the whistle thing might work.

    Although most people are ok, you only want some idiot who has a bitch in season, and you will never get him back. Has he been neutered? I found that Joshua was like this when he got to about 10 months till I had him neutered. Now he is as good as gold.
     
  9. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    If the dog doesn't have a 100% reliable recall he/she shouldn't be off leash especially in an unsecured area or an area where the dog is likely to be a hassle to other pet owners, pets or people.

    The more she practices the not coming back and gets such great rewards for it, the harder it is to put right.
     
  10. NicoleW

    NicoleW PetForums VIP

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    The percidiment I have with that, is you can practice recall all you want. 2 months solidly, every day, in the home, garden, in the park with no dogs about. But how are you going to practice recall with dogs about to teach him to come to you even if there's lots of distractions, when you can never let him off lead because you don't know if he'll come back with another dog there?

    This is assuming you don't know anyone in your area who has a nice calm dog
     
  11. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    Use a long line so you have control. Make friends with at least a couple of other dog walkers nearby if you don't have friends or family that can help.

    If you have done all that ground work that's wonderful. But its a question of what exactly to practice and how to move on with exercises so as to progress.

    Before going to the full top ten of distractions, let's say that's other dogs, work on the training game Distraction Recalls (its prob one of my fave training games!) with lower powered distractions and build up.

    When we start dealing with distractions we need to understand that they are good :confused: I know that doesn't sound right but if your dog is distracted by something that's not you you have just worked out what motivates him more than you in that scenario.

    I also use a back up - an emergency stop cue - and I have that proofed way way way more than I do my dog's recall. I don't think I could call him off mid-squirrel chase but I can stop him in his tracks on a verbal cue from some distance away from him.

    So, turn distractions into rewards for obeying first. This is called Premack's Principle, also called Grandma's Law - eat your vegetables so that you can have ice cream. Recall to me so that you can go meet that dog.

    I use about 9 different exercises to proof recalls and work on each one at a time. Starting off in low distraction areas to get at least 80% success rate before moving onto the next distraction level. Yep it takes time but I want to be able to have my dog off leash so as to exercise him and get him back on leash when needed.
     
  12. NicoleW

    NicoleW PetForums VIP

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    Smartie pants ;)
     
  13. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    ok recall tips (abbreviated):

    - management: long line
    - new recall cue
    - know your name game - put his name onto a whiplash response
    - teach him to hand target
    - put the new recall cue onto the hand signal (hand target)
    - collar grabs = wonderful things
    - recall relay exercises EVERYWHERE
    - recall reward return
    - distraction recall exercises with all manner of 'distractions'
    - hide n seek

    No more food bowls. All kibble for recall training. Use kibble now so that you still have some guns in your arsenal if needed (which it hopefully will not be) later on.

    Detail on these here: Rover! Rover? ROVER!!! – 100% rock solid reliable recalls | Pet Central's Pawsitive Dawgs Blog!

    Remember 80% success at least before moving on. Always start with the easiest to resist distractions e.g. a dog standing still 100m away is easier to ignore than a dog running or playing 200m away!

    Teach dog to ask permission to greet other dogs. Start right up close - 5feet away. Stand and wait for eye contact from your dog, just a flash. As soon as glances jump forward to allow him to greet.
    Build duration of eye contact.
    Then build distance between you and other dog.

    Will take months but is well worth it :)
     
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  14. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    It's a very common problem.

    check out the sticky at the top of the page...

    One of my rescue's has at last started to be less excited with other dogs and will listen more. He is 4 years of age, and it has just happened.
     
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