Eclampsia

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by PoppyLove, Dec 5, 2009.


  1. PoppyLove

    PoppyLove PetForums Junior

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    Hi

    We are expecting a litter of 8 adorable tzus.

    Its our first time I want to have everything ready.

    Whelping kit almost done

    My neighbour has said watch out for eclampsia but I dont know the signs. Could somebody please advise me. Thx
     
  2. nat1979

    nat1979 PetForums VIP

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    Whats a tzus :confused5:

    If you google it there are lots of websites that will tell you about it
    Heres one
    Eclampsia in Dogs
     
  3. tiddlypup

    tiddlypup PetForums VIP

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    my little jrt bitch went into it at about 2 weeks after the birth,was fine in the morning but a few hours later was very vacant,moved as if she was drunk,i gave her 2 600mg calcium tablets and went to the vet,he said my actions saved her,she was fine the same day,i gave her 1 tablet a day for a week,then started weaning

    nat its shih tzus,lol
     
  4. loverbull

    loverbull PetForums Junior

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    One of my bitches had it quite soon after whelping. She walked like she was drunk and would just stare at the pups. She also would go into the garden and sit under the bushes. I gave her calcium in a liquid form and she picked up. I continued until the pups were weaned.
    I now give it to all my bitches after they have whelped.
     
  5. moboyd

    moboyd PetForums VIP

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    Eclampsia; more commonly known simply as 'milk fever' or more technically as 'puerperal tetany' is a fast acting, potentially fatal condition. It is imperitive that if you are going to breed your female dog, you MUST be aware of these signs as it requires immediate vet care and all females are at risk; small breeds or those with large litters especially.

    1These signs progress very rapidly, sometimes in a matter of minutes. Act fast or your girl could die.
    First thing you will notice is that she will act 'off'. She won't want to tend to her babies. She will likely be very 'needy' of your attention and appear worried. She will become restless and begin panting. The panting will get increasingly worse to the point of not only drooling a little but A LOT.

    Step 2Very soon after this - maybe minutes, maybe an hour - she will start staggering around, tripping and even falling right down. This is very scary. It's almost as if she were drunk or having a stroke.

    Step 3She may then get to a point where she can not stand any longer and just keep moving her legs in an awkward paddling motion as if she were having seizures. Her neck and head may even thrust backwards as she arches her back. By this point, if she is not at least on the way to the vet, she may die. It is SO important that you get your girl rushed to the vet the moment you see the first signs and NOT wait until this stage, yet if this is the first you see of it, don't give up, the vet may still save her. Get her to your vet NOW.


    Tips & Warnings
    Feeding puppy chow, which is high in calcium, to a lactating female will help to prevent eclampsia (milk fever)Your vet may be willing to supply you with a tube of gelled calcium that you can give yourself at the very early stages of milk fever - along with his/her instructions on it's use. They are not likely to offer this to a first time dog breeder but if you've already experienced it, they may give you some to have on hand.Do NOT feed calcium enriched foods or supplements to pregnant dogs despite the many suggestions you will find in books and the net to do so. By doing this, you are tricking the body into thinking it can 'throw out' calcium as it has an overabundance. By doing so, you will actually INCREASE your risk of eclampsia. It can also have the unwanted side effect of prolonged labors. Wait until your female has her litter to feed calcium enriched foods.

    Mo
     
  6. nat1979

    nat1979 PetForums VIP

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    Thanks thought it was a silly name for a new breed
     
  7. mitch4

    mitch4 PetForums VIP

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    if you change your girl over to a weening/puppy food in the latter part of her pregnancy this has a higher calcium content, is this ok or should you really only feed this food once shes had the pups I didnt change Molly over last time before only after the birth was she switched but the pregnancy and weening took it out of her and this time advice is to change her when she gets to 6 weeks pregnant, shes 5 weeks at present and wev started to increase normal food slightly as shes ravenous

    Thanks guys :thumbup1:
     
  8. belleboris

    belleboris PetForums Senior

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    My girl had eclampsia after a week of having 8 pups ! i arnt believe how fast it ame on in the morning she was fine went for a wee and played with a ball in the garden for 10 min , by 5 that afternoon she was in the vets as an emergancy .
    After hse had been seen by the vets she got better very quick but i did have to hand feed the pups but mum and all 8 , 5 week old pups are well now . look it up on the internet there are some vids on you tube not nice but you can clearley see the symptoms .
     
  9. xxwelshcrazyxx

    xxwelshcrazyxx PetForums VIP

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    Awwww little Shih Tzu's how nice,

    Eclampsia or milk fever in the bitch
     
  10. moboyd

    moboyd PetForums VIP

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    From what I remember I gave Cal D AFTER the pups were born, I beleive and will stand corrected, giving high calcium feeding BEFORE birth can trick the body and can actually cause enclampsia. I did not feed any puppy food to my bitch near the time of pregnancy she got her normal food but more of it, in smaller portions fed more often.

    Mo
     
  11. xxwelshcrazyxx

    xxwelshcrazyxx PetForums VIP

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    Moboyd is right, I always feed my pregnant Chihuahua on puppy food from 6 weeks onwards and a really good quality one too, I buy he Natures Diet puppy food. All the calcium and nutrients that the pregnant dog needs are in the puppy food.
     
  12. muse08

    muse08 PetForums Member

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    Supplimenting with Calcium during pregnancy can also cause uterine inertia.

    ACCA Newsletter
     
  13. mitch4

    mitch4 PetForums VIP

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    Thanks for this. I will keep her on her normal food and just increase and then when pups are born she can have the puppy food for a little while to boost her :thumbup1:
     
  14. PoppyLove

    PoppyLove PetForums Junior

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    What can you feed if they are a fussy eater. Which is full of nutrients etc
     
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